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Inside Influence: One On One With Steven Bartlett

I spoke to social media influencer and entrepreneur Steve Bartlett about his best advice

Adam: How did you become an influencer? What’s the inside story?

Steve: The key to becoming an influencer is giving a certain audience some kind of value. Fashion
influencers will give a community of young men or women advice on what to wear and how
to wear it, meaning that all of their content will be bringing value to that community. I do this
by leveraging my own personal story and the value within it. I take my journey of being an
18 year old kid who is now a 25 year old entrepreneur and I produce content that caters to
an audience who are interested in replicating this journey using their own passions or
stories. I capitalize on social media and the ever-changing possibilities within this to do so.

Adam: What advice do you have for those interested in working with influencers? How do you
decide who to work with?

Steve: When working with influencers, ensure that you don’t get sucked into the trap of believing
followers equal return. The metrics that matter most are the ones that allude to the fact that
an influencer can cause action. These can include comments and more meaningful types
of engagement as they are better litmus tests for an influencer to distinguish whether you
can get a an audience to buy into your product. I would also advise working with certain
influencers on a long-term basis instead of considering it to be a campaign or a one-off
post. You’re looking for brand ambassadors who will provide a greater return as the
audience will be more likely to believe that it isn’t just a paid partnership and that the
influencer has a genuine interest in the product or service, outside of being paid.

Adam: What advice do you have for those interested in becoming influencers?

Steve: If you’re interested in becoming an influencer, the first thing you need to do is identify
where you value is. You might be an artist, amazing at making videos or really funny and
you need to have the self awareness to understand what you’re unique value is. You then
need to understand which platforms or ‘stage’ is best to tell your story.

Adam: What is the biggest misconception about the influencer world and life as an influencer?

Steve: The biggest misconception around being an influencer is that it’s inherently easy.
Producing content on platforms that reward creators for producing every single day is a
challenging job. As an influencer, you can’t have a day off. Although there are great
rewards, it is very much a 24/7 job. Platforms are constantly changing and you have to be
on top of these changes. If you don’t adapt you can become irrelevant fairly quickly. It’s like
having a steam train and consistently filling the engine with coal. If you don’t, the
momentum will stop.

Adam: What has being an influencer taught you about branding and marketing? 

Steve: Being an influencer has taught me that people buy from people. The strongest connection
you can have isn’t to a brand, it is to a person. People connections are significantly stronger
than brand connections. This is essentially what influencer marketing is: it’s a person
becoming a brand and telling you the story of their product. This is why it’s so powerful.

Adam: What are your hobbies and how have they shaped you?

Steve: I enjoy watching documentaries and playing football and I feel that these play a big part in
encouraging my natural competitive nature. I would however say that my biggest hobby is
my work. My truth is that I work 7 days a week, virtually every waking hour and I don’t
switch off. I believe in the concept of life-life balance, which breaks the traditional construct
of work. I am currently able to dedicate my time to my ‘work’ 24/7 and if I am in the position
where I can indulge in my passion, be successful and make money from it – why would I
not?

Adam: Who have been the biggest influences in your life and how do you pay it forward?

Steve: I think we are constantly influenced by what we consume. It could be a person who I
interview for my podcast, The Diary of a CEO, or it could be a book I read. Each of these
outlets are always giving me a different perspective on something and offering alternative
ideas that effect how I live and work. I think it’s always important to share these new
learnings with the people around you, whether that be in passing conversation, in a
meeting or on social media.

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