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Inside Influence: One On One With Quinn Slocum

I spoke to social media influencer Quinn Slocum about his best advice

Adam: Thanks again for taking the time to go behind the brand. First things first, though, what is something about you that the many people who follow you don’t know?

Quinn: People that follow my pages are extremely surprised when they find out my age. As a social media entrepreneur, I have found my way to be able to be whoever I want, and have gained maturity in the way I do things behind the screen.

Adam: How did you become an “influencer”? What is the inside story?

Quinn: At thirteen I got a hand-me-down of my older brothers laptop, and began to start video editing. It was my outlet for my creativeness. Which then began posting on Vine and editing sports videos of lacrosse. Months went by, I created a fanbase of 30,000 lacrosse followers. Time passed, I went had made friends with an Instagram sports page owner who at the time, wanted to try something new and have me create all his edits in return for shoutouts. I edited sports videos, and in return he gave me shoutouts for a page I started called @bestcelebrations. The first week, the niche was so new to the community that it had grown 50,000 in the first week, and from there on out, I collabed with more influencers, and boosted the growth with $30 a week. My mom would put this on my debit card so I could buy myself food while she was out of town. Instead of food I bought shoutouts.

Adam: What advice do you have for those interested in working with influencers? How do you decide who to work with?

Quinn: Tell them exactly what you want. Have the deal set up with what you believe you can offer to them before the conversation started.

Since there are so many pages out there, often times it can be hard to decide which ones are authentic, and which ones aren’t. It’s best to study them, their engagement, see if people are commenting.The first question I ask myself is; what is their like to follower ratio?I am often looking for for a 10% engagement rate for creators, and around a 5% engagement rate for curators.

Let me break it down the social media science more.

Alright, if a page has 10,000 followers, you want to make sure they are averaging at least or close to 1,000 likes. Next, if they are averaging 1,000 likes, take a glance at the types of people liking and commenting on their posts, do they follow them?

A simple guide to checking for real engagement:

Watch when a influencer posts, a page that gets 2,000 likes is not going to get 50 likes within the first hour.

Watch the first ten minutes, this can tell you everything that you need to know.

Check at thirty minutes, look if the likes have spiked dramatically. Example, From 50 likes in ten minutes to 1000 likes in thirty.

Come back in a few hours, and see the people that are liking the post, follow them.

Overall, make sure you collaborate with creative, authentic influencers, doing their best to set himself aside from the rest. When approaching an influencer, tell them exactly what you want. Have a proposal set up with what you believe you can offer to them before the conversation started.

Adam: What advice do you have for those interested in becoming influencers?

Quinn:

•Find your passion, if you don’t know what that is whatever makes you dream crazy, and drives you to what you want people to know you as is your passion.

•Surround yourself with people who want to grow, don’t be stuck in a pool of people who bring down your creative ideas.

•Don’t be like the rest, be you. In a world saturated with everyone trying to be the same, stand out.

•Dream crazy, and make it a reality. Often times it’s the people that don’t push past the creative limits who don’t grow a following.

•Never stop learning. I agree that college is becoming less and less relevant with our generation but don’t get mixed up with that you don’t have to grow your mindset. There are so many things that need to be learnt, and we can’t learn it all. So find what you need to learn and master that area.

•Make every piece of content you post better than the last one. This will push you to get out and create something and learn new skills. If you think the picture you posted could’ve been better, go out and seek adventure and creativity to make a better picture.

Adam: What is the biggest misconception about the influencer world and life as an influencer?

Quinn: You have to be comfortable with being uncomfortable. A misconception many people make of influencers is that life is filled with this constant wanderlust when in reality there’s a lot more that goes on below the surface. There’s a perseverance and test of character that you have to go through and ultimately the passion is what’s going to drive you as as an influencer. If you don’t have the passion and learn to love the process there’s going to be no desire to continue to fuel your creativity. So often times, as a influencer it might seem like life is perfect but in reality there’s a non-stop grind and disconnect and sacrifice from other aspects of life. Ultimately that’s what it takes, waking up at sunrise, shooting photos in the day, sending emails, posting and finding content, back for sunset, go shoot some stars, and back to sunrise the next day to redo the process. Honestly it gets pretty addicting and you forget you haven’t slept and have been surviving off peanut butter for the past three days because you wanted to bring camera gear.

Adam: What has being an influencer taught you about branding and marketing?

Quinn: Being an influencer has taught me that branding and marketing don’t need to be complicated. Marketing and branding should be simple and appealing to the eye, and should make a connection in people’s lives. Being an influencer has taught me to simply in marketing, to keep it simple.

Adam: What are your hobbies and how have they shaped you?

Quinn: My hobbies include rock climbing and photography, both which have shaped me to have a better love for the planet, and a more desire to keep growing every single day. These hobbies of mine both include constant beating on your craft because there is no limit to how much you can learn and achieve. Whether it’s a super difficult climb I’ve been working on and putting hours of training in just to complete it, or seeing how to master light in photography in more complicated ways. It has shaped me into a kid who is eager to find stoke wherever I go and reach my full potential.

Adam: Who have been the biggest influences in your life and how do you pay it forward?

Quinn: By far, my parents. My parents have helped me through so much and supported my crazy dreams the whole way through. There was never a moment in time where they would say no to something and to be completely honest they’ve always supported me in taking risks. I honestly don’t think I’d be where I am today without the amount of love and support they’ve given me throughout my journey. A personal thanks for always letting a crazy kid like me dream. My dad has personally has been a huge part of my life, and in the lessons he has taught me that everything has it’s reasoning in order to shape us into why we’re here in the world. From turning experiences and guiding me through pain to help me understand why these lessons were put into my life. So thank you dad for teaching me how things come back in different shapes and forms, and the only way to solve them is to learn and really understand the lessons that are trying to be taught. My momma, I can’t thank her enough for all she’s done for me and my siblings. She is honestly one of a kind, a speaker, an amazing women, and she is constantly putting others before herself. The amount of sacrifices she’s made, I am so thankful for. My parents aren’t together anymore, but they both teach me different ways to love and pursue my passion, and I am forever grateful for everything they bring into my life.

As well as the world they’ve brought me into. Tony Robbins has been a huge part of my day to day life and connected me with so many amazing people. I remember being a kid listening to events, and as well as that passion he has to always help other people. He is a great example of someone who lives for others, and lessons I’ve learned by listening through all the events since I was a squirt.

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