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“In every formal education setting we need to support what every individual child is interested in learning” with Arevik Anapiosyan and Penny Bauder

In every formal education setting we need to support what every individual child is interested in learning. We need to appreciate the differences and different styles of learning while also exposing all kids to the beauty of science. And then it will be up to them to choose if they want to continue in a […]

In every formal education setting we need to support what every individual child is interested in learning. We need to appreciate the differences and different styles of learning while also exposing all kids to the beauty of science. And then it will be up to them to choose if they want to continue in a scientific direction or not. In Armenia, 25% off all female college applicants apply to science departments and major in STEM fields. We think this is a significant number and we are proud to be able to support these young women.


WCIT is the signature event of the World Information Technology & Services Alliance (WITSA), a consortium of information and communications technology (ICT) associations from 83 countries, representing 90% of the industry. During the 2019 WCIT held in Armenia this year, I had the pleasure of interviewing Arevik Anapiosyan, Armenia’s Deputy Minister of Education and Science.


Thank you for joining us. We’d love to hear what you are doing to engage more girls in STEM subjects.

In Armenia, girls have equal opportunities in science and technology education. The first thing that we’re doing institutionally is to reform the education system by incorporating more STEM subjects to balance out offerings in other subjects. That’s the first thing. The second thing we are doing is ensuring that girls continue to get access to STEM education and tech offerings. Additionally, in Armenia, another educational focus of ours is robotics, which is available to all kids starting in fifth grade. About 50% of our schools offer robotics labs, which incorporate informatics, mechatronics and electronics.

Okay. I’d love to hear a story about you growing up. What was your experience like as a little girl? Were you interested in science and technology when you were young?

I was very much into science. The old household appliances we had always had a lot of wires and me and my two sisters loved to take these old appliances apart and use the different pieces to create something new out of them, like turning something into a tape recorder. Eventually, I picked a profession, not a subject to study. I ended up deciding to be a political scientist but if I were to choose just a few subjects to specialize in, I would have chosen mathematics and astrophysics. Astrophysics is veryinteresting and there are endless areas for exploration. I have a daughter who wants to become a scientist to figure out how was space created and what was there prior to the space. I absolutely appreciate her interest.

How do you think we can encourage our daughters to keep them interested in science and technology, especially during their teenage years?

In every formal education setting we need to support what every individual child is interested in learning. We need to appreciate the differences and different styles of learning while also exposing all kids to the beauty of science. And then it will be up to them to choose if they want to continue in a scientific direction or not. In Armenia, 25% off all female college applicants apply to science departments and major in STEM fields. We think this is a significant number and we are proud to be able to support these young women.

And we are working on creating better opportunities for females to hold those highly paid jobs traditionally held by men. We are improving the situation for women overall by promoting healthy work life balance and creating better working conditions for women by promoting shared family responsibilities.

I’m super excited for Armenia. Thank you so much for your time.

Thank you so much.

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