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Immigration Attorney Brad Bernstein: “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness; By immersing myself in different cultures and customs it allows me to think broadly and understand differing perspectives”

Although I love to work, it is so important to recharge, and close yourself off from the working world. Personally, I love to travel. Exploring new countries, cities and places is not only exciting, but it helps me grow as a person. Mark Twain said “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” By immersing […]


Although I love to work, it is so important to recharge, and close yourself off from the working world. Personally, I love to travel. Exploring new countries, cities and places is not only exciting, but it helps me grow as a person. Mark Twain said “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” By immersing myself in different cultures and customs it allows me to think broadly and understand differing perspectives. Favorites travel spots are Southeast Asia, Europe and the Caribbean.


I had the pleasure of interviewing Brad Bernstein. Brad Bernstein is the president and managing partner of the Law Offices of Spar & Bernstein, P.C. in New York City. Brad estimates that, over his two decade career, he has helped more than 100,000 clients with every kind of immigration problem imaginable and helped many of them change their lives for the better. Brad has helped his clients obtain green cards for themselves and their families and has provided essential help to those obtaining their United States citizenship, while also preventing deportations.


Thank you so much for joining us Brad! What is your “backstory”?

After graduating from Brooklyn Law School with honors, I set out on my own with the goal of becoming a civil trial attorney. I opened up my civil practice within the confines of the Law Offices of Harry Spar, my 82-year-old grandfather’s solo immigration practice. But within weeks, a health emergency required that I take over and manage my grandfather’s immigration cases. It didn’t take long thereafter that I found a true passion for helping immigrants to make better lives for themselves and to achieve their American dreams.

Can you share the most interesting story that occurred to you in the course of your career?

A very famous conservative pundit known for his extremely negative immigrant rhetoric asked me to represent his Latina nanny in a deportation proceeding. He said that he desperately needed his undocumented nanny in the United States because his kids rely on her. We got her a green card; but, oh the hypocrisy!

Can you share the funniest mistake that you made when you first started? Can you share the lesson you learned from it?

Having a live show can lead to many interesting situations — especially when you have a very passionate fan base. During one particular show, the comments lit up, daring me to twerk. I, of course, accepted the challenge, and the next day, I found myself twerking in various locations throughout my home. The entire twerk session was filmed and aired on the show, which was responded to with uproarious laughter. I’ve learned a few things during this time. One, never verbally accept a dare on a live show without thinking it through. Two, middle-aged men should not twerk, and three, if they choose to do so, don’t show it to 10,000 people.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

Eighteen years ago, I positioned myself before a microphone on New York’s local WVIP station 93.5 FM to help people from all over the world with their immigration issues. With a background in practicing law, I strived to close the gap of attorney-client accessibility — and flip wavering justice statistics in favor of those less fortunate. Since my radio show, I grew the program into a two-hour daily broadcast live show on Facebook and YouTube. My professionally produced digital show, Brad Show Live, sets out to address the multi-faceted set of issues immigrants face outside of the courtroom as well as inside. Tackling topics on social justice, equality, politics and more, my show helps, educates and humanizes the immigrant American experience and introduces viewers to other cultures through a unique digital platform.

Who are some of the most interesting people you have interacted with? What was that like? Do you have any stories?

The show’s guests are as diverse as its audience. International superstar Shaggy, Black Panther actor Bambadjan Bamba, former Real Housewife of New York Aviva Drescher, former Fox News anchor Juliet Huddy, Coco voice actor Herbert Siguenza, along with activists, influencers, deported veterans, immigrants facing deportation, and permanent residents chasing their American dreams have shared their immigration stories and experiences. It’s been eye-opening and rewarding to be able to hear and share their experiences to a wide audience.

What advice would you give to someone considering a career in journalism?

Words matter. When people refer to undocumented persons as “illegal” or “aliens” they are not only dehumanizing, isolating and ‘othering’ an entire population — but in most cases, they are simply wrong. With a background in immigration law, I can tell you that it is not a crime to be undocumented in the U.S., It is merely a civil offense. An undocumented presence becomes illegal if you leave the U.S. with an order of deportation, and try to re-enter without permission. As it is, most people are undocumented in America because they were legally inspected when they entered the country, but overstayed their time. As a media personality, I would advise journalists to be fact-based when reporting, writing or telling the news.

What advice would you give to your colleagues in the industry, to thrive and not “burnout”?

Although I love to work, it is so important to recharge, and close yourself off from the working world. Personally, I love to travel. Exploring new countries, cities and places is not only exciting, but it helps me grow as a person. Mark Twain said “Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness.” By immersing myself in different cultures and customs it allows me to think broadly and understand differing perspectives. Favorites travel spots are Southeast Asia, Europe and the Caribbean.

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world?

Since becoming the managing partner of the Law Offices of Spar & Bernstein, I have legally assisted over 100,000 immigrants with all sorts of immigration issues — but there is always more to be done. Throughout the course of my life, I have brainstormed unique ways to solve problems. My daily two-hour broadcast show, Brad Show Live, is a prime example of this. In an effort to fuse entertainment and humor with knowledge, help and action, Brad Show Live has become a platform that not only shines a positive light on the hands and minds of those who shape our nation, but it also fills a gap in current day legal practices. The show tackles the nuances of integrating into the American lifestyle, and profiles immigrants and refugees who defy the negative images in the media. I also bring effective counsel to underserved communities who would not typically have access to legal assistance.

I know this is not an easy job. What drives you?

Many people call into Brad Show Live riddled with anxiety and fear. Some callers are frantic and don’t know what they can do to solve their immigration issues. My job is to listen, lower anxiety and provide effective counsel. Many callers call back just to tell me how much I have educated, helped or empowered them. It’s incredibly fulfilling to know that I’ve made an impact on someone’s life.

Do you have a favorite book that made a deep impact on your life? Can you share a story?

My favorite book is Civil Action by Jonathan Harr. The non-fiction story is based off a court case concerning environmental pollution in Massachusetts in the 1980s. I read this book early into my legal career and found it both fascinating and suspenseful.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Gun reform. More than 228,000 students have experienced gun violence at a school since Columbine on April 20,1999. Congress continues to not address this pressing issue. I have two children of my own currently in school. Educational institutions should be a safe space for learning — not a danger zone.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Being a full time host is just as time consuming as being the managing partner of a law firm. My days are crazy busy! I work about 12 -14 hour days. When I am not managing a 20 plus attorney law firm, I am hosting a live two-hour digital show.
  2. Self-care is an essential part of ensuring you can help the most people to the best of your ability, because there are going to be some very tough days. Hearing the stories of struggle and oppression from my clients and the guests on my show can take an emotional toll. It can be tough to accept that you can’t help every single person. But ultimately, this is the most fulfilling way I could spend my time. To know that I’m making a difference makes the lows worth it. My self-care involves traveling all over the world and spending time with my children, but find whatever works best for you.
  3. Take leaps of faith. When I first started my show on the radio more than 20 years ago, many couldn’t understand how I could help thousands of people for free on the air and grow my law firm at the same time. When I decided to turn my office into a green screen studio and hire a full production team to help create a one-of-a-kind digital show, many people had never even heard of live streaming. Today, my law firm has consulted over 100,000 clients, and I reach over 50,000 people on my show every single week, with more watching daily. People will constantly doubt you. Prove them wrong.
  4. Keep learning and evolving. Today, both immigration policy and the digital world move at lightning speed. If you don’t stay up-to-date with the latest strategies and policies, you could quickly lose your edge. Staying on top of what’s going on. Constantly implementing new ideas in both my show and my firm has allowed for phenomenal professional growth.
  5. Surround yourself with a great team. So much of the show and my firm’s success can be attributed not just to me, but to the amazing talent I’ve surrounded myself with. I pride myself on hiring based on talent and a desire to make a difference. It’s made my firm one of the most diverse businesses in the city. Every corner of the world is represented, and the unique perspectives that kind of diversity fosters has greatly contributed to my success.

Some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might see this. 🙂

Banksy. He always has something to say, political or social, through his art. He is incredibly talented with a great business mind. He’s a very good marketer with a sense of humor, which is apparent in his work. He influences people all over the world. Something I admire,.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

On Facebook and Twitter, I can be found @BradBernstein. On Instagram, @realbradbernstein. You can follow Brad Show Live on all platforms, including Twitter, YouTube, Facebook and Instagram @BradShowLive.

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