Thrive on Campus//

“I’ll Do It Later” and Other Excuses We Make

Here's the hard truth about what it truly takes to beat procrastination once and for all.

Source: Pexels
Source: Pexels

Welcome to our new section, Thrive on Campus, devoted to covering the urgent issue of mental health among college and university students from all angles. If you are a college student, we invite you to apply to be an Editor-at-Large, or to simply contribute (please tag your pieces ThriveOnCampus.) We welcome faculty, clinicians, and graduates to contribute as well. Read more here.

I’m queen of “I’ll do it later.”

It seems as though everyday there are a multitude of things that I put off. My inner dialogue goes something like this:

“I’ll return that voicemail later.”

“I’ll update my planner later.”

“I’ll call send that email later.”

“I’ll wash the dishes later.”

Either one of three things happens.

  1. I forget about what I supposed to do until the last minute, and then apologise profusely to the person that I let down by my lateness.
  2. I keep putting it off.
  3. I miss my deadline altogether.

OK. Things happen right?

Well, not so fast.

I could see that being an excuse if what I was doing was critical or beneficial in helping me accomplish my goals and dreams. But, the sad part of this is that, usually, what is keeping me from accomplishing what I need to do is something as simple as social media or checking news updates.

This is problematic: I am delaying my progress in accomplishing my goals because of distractions that never really come to an end. There will always be news updates. Something new will always pop up on your twitter feed. But your clock is ticking!

While we are in college and believing for our dreams, we have to seize every opportunity given to us and be good stewards over our time.

My pastor, Toure Roberts, recently said that procrastination is a fluffy, cute term for laziness. As tough as that sounds, it is the truth.

We need to do better, friends!

When that thought pops up into your mind of something that you need to get done, don’t just ignore it. If you’re able to, jump on it. We want to be productive with our time. If you can’t get to the task right away, write it down on a sticky note or in your planner to remind yourself to get it done as soon as possible.

Now, we all need breaks. Rest and self care are just as important as getting your work done. However, if you know that you are spending an excessive amount of time on Netflix and social media, let this be a friendly reminder for you to try and break that habit.

What are your dreams after college? Do you want to own your own business? Start a family practice? Become an author?

That will never happen by spending hours on social media and watching Netflix. Look at the work ethic of people who have accomplished goals similar to yours. It takes discipline to put the phone down, turn the TV off and get some work done.

Another important point: Small daily tasks may seem tedious and meaningless. But don’t let your mind deceive you! Our dreams will come into fruition by being intentional about these small, daily tasks that we are given, especially tasks that have to do with your future educational/career goals. Start that graduate school application! Email that professor about office hours. Ultimately, these small daily steps will accumulate and put you in the direction of your dreams.

“If you are faithful in little things, you will be faithful in large ones. But if you are dishonest in little things, you won’t be honest with greater responsibilities.” LUKE 16:10

We got this!

-KWD

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More on Mental Health on Campus:

What Campus Mental Health Centers Are Doing to Keep Up With Student Need

If You’re a Student Who’s Struggling With Mental Health, These 7 Tips Will Help

The Hidden Stress of RAs in the Student Mental Health Crisis

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