Community//

How to Use the Pomodoro Technique to Improve Time Management

We live in a culture that rewards moving fast, being ultra-productive, and pushing ourselves to the limit. In the workplace, many employees rush throughout their day to “beat the clock” and end up multi-tasking with mistakes, inefficiencies, confusion, and lack of confidence. Employees also sit through long meetings that eat up their time and cause […]

We live in a culture that rewards moving fast, being ultra-productive, and pushing ourselves to the limit. In the workplace, many employees rush throughout their day to “beat the clock” and end up multi-tasking with mistakes, inefficiencies, confusion, and lack of confidence. Employees also sit through long meetings that eat up their time and cause frustration. The result? Burnout. Health problems. Employee churn. Sound familiar?

The Pomodoro Technique is a simple time management system created by Francesco Cirillo that helps people be more productive without added stress. It’s made up of six easy steps that immediately get results using only a timer, pen, and paper.

  1. Choose a task, big or small, that you want to accomplish.
  2. Set a timer for 25 minutes of uninterrupted work (a Pomodoro).
  3. Work on the task until the timer rings.
  4. When the timer rings, make a checkmark on a piece of paper.
  5. Take a short break; note the time on the paper.
  6. Start over again.

Congrats! You’ve just completed a Pomodoro. After every 4 Pomodoros, take a longer break of 20 or 30 minutes.

This technique works because it helps people identify how much effort activities require, cut down on interruptions, increase focus, set clear boundaries with work time and free time, and define goals. With effective time management, you’ll feel more confident, less stressed, and be able to separate work from your personal time and avoid workplace burnout.

Want to learn more? Check out the official Pomodoro Technique site at francescocirillo.com.

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