Community//

How to tackle stress in the workplace

Losing a job can be devastating, and unemployed workers are exposed to physical health problems, marital stress, anxiety, depression, and even suicide.

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.

In this time of great economic turmoil, hundreds of workers have lost their jobs due to downsizing and reorganization of companies, layoffs, mergers and bankruptcies. Millions of workers have been transferred to perform unfamiliar tasks within their companies and wonder how long they will be employed. Adding to the pressures workers already face are their new bosses, computerized production control, fewer health and retirement benefits, and the feeling that they must work longer and harder just to maintain their current financial position. . Workers at all levels experience increased stress and uncertainty and are constantly updating their resumes. For more information visit website at locksmith near me.

Losing a job can be devastating, and unemployed workers are exposed to physical health problems, marital stress, anxiety, depression, and even suicide. Losing a job affects every aspect of life, from getting up in the morning to who you see and what you can do. Stress is chronic until transition to a new position.

A feeling of helplessness

The feeling of helplessness is a universal cause of stress at work, when you feel that you cannot do anything about it, you are also assailed by helplessness and hopelessness, usual companions of depression. You do not alter or avoid the situation because you feel that nothing can be done.

Higher-stress occupations marked by the need to respond to the demands and schedules of others, with little control over events, include secretaries, waitresses, middle managers, police officers, editors, and internship medical students. Complaints of having too much responsibility and too little authority, unfair work practices, and inadequate descriptions of job responsibilities are common in this work situation. Employees can counter these pressures through unions or other labor organizations, claims or personnel offices, or, more commonly, through direct negotiations with their immediate supervisors.

Your job description

Each employee should have a specific, written description of their job responsibilities. The simple act of negotiating a job description does more to dispel feelings of helplessness than anything else we know of. It is a contract that you help to write. You can make objections and insist on what you want. If there are consents, it is because you agreed to them. With a defined job description, your expectations are spelled out, as are those of your boss.

A good job description has an end date. Set a specific date for a review based on your mutual experience with this initial job description. If you and your boss can’t agree on what your job description should be, look for another job, either within the same company or outside of it. Even in these tough times in the economy, it’s important that your job be a source of satisfaction and respect.

Traumatic events at work

Some jobs are specifically dangerous and others can turn into that suddenly. Criminal justice personnel, firefighters, ambulance drivers, military personnel, and rescue teams witness many dire scenes and are routinely exposed to personal danger. They often handle such incidents with skill. However, a particular bad episode will linger on them occasionally, and will appear in the form of flashbacks and nightmares. This can be followed by difficulty sleeping, guilt, fear, and physical ailments. Even ordinary jobs can become traumatic: for example, physical threats to an employee by a co-worker, boss or client, the collision of a bus on a study trip, an employee robbed or taken hostage, a shooting. These events can create Post Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and lead to workers’ compensation claims if workers do not receive treatment from a trauma specialist.

Work environment

Sometimes the work environment creates physical stress due to noise, lack of privacy, poor lighting, poor ventilation, poor temperature control, or inadequate sanitary facilities. Environments where organizational confusion or an overly authoritarian, overly liberal, or crisis-focused management style reign are psychologically stressful.

Take action through labor organizations or employees to alter stressful working conditions. If this doesn’t work, try the courts, which have become much more open to complaints of stressful working conditions. Recent regulations have created pressure for employers to offer work environments that are as stress-free as possible

    Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

    You might also like...

    G-Stock Studio / Shutterstock
    Well-Being//

    Society’s Most Important Jobs May Actually Be Worse For Mental Health

    by Allana Akhtar, Rebecca Aydin
    Work Smarter//

    4 Ways to Manage Your Anxiety While Job Hunting

    by Glassdoor
    Community//

    MENTAL HEALTH AT WORK: COMMON CONDITIONS AND HOW IT IMPACTS WORKERS

    by Scott Autten
    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.