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How to Support the Future of Live Music After COVID

The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the music industry as much as everything else. Yes, artists are still releasing music and putting on socially-distant concerts that you can watch online, but live music really doesn’t exist anymore in 2020. Concert venues throughout the world are in danger of shutting down if they haven’t already, and musicians […]

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The COVID-19 pandemic has affected the music industry as much as everything else. Yes, artists are still releasing music and putting on socially-distant concerts that you can watch online, but live music really doesn’t exist anymore in 2020. Concert venues throughout the world are in danger of shutting down if they haven’t already, and musicians that rely on the revenue from live performances are also struggling. live music is tentatively expected to return to the UK in April 2021, with a similar timeframe for live performances in the United States. Since that may as well be an eternity for those who have relied on concert revenue in the past, venues and performers will need your support in the meantime.

Donating to Venues and Musicians

If you want to support your favorite musicians and concert venues during the pandemic, you can always donate to them or causes that benefit them. Look to see if nearby concert venues or local musicians have crowdfunding efforts to keep them afloat on their websites to get started. Otherwise, you can donate to groups such as Stagehand, BackUp, and the Musician’s Union Hardship Fund if you live in the UK.

Buy Merchandise

It’s no secret that bands make much of their money selling merchandise at their shows, and many of them still have t-shirts, posters, albums, and other items available through their websites even if they aren’t playing live anywhere. Ordering merchandise can really help them out, and wearing their shirts and displaying their posters could give them free publicity when they are able to go on stage again. Most artists don’t make a lot of money from streaming services, so purchase their music directly from them when you can.

Stream Concerts

Streaming a concert may not feel the same as actually going to a venue for a live performance, but it’s still a great way to show support for your favorite artists. Even if they are streamed for free, many at least provide information for you to donate to an artist or a venue.

Buy Tickets for Next Year

There may not be any concerts being held now, but that doesn’t mean there won’t be concerts in the future at your favorite venue. Some artists and venues are scheduling their concerts a year in advance, and buying a ticket for one of these future shows can be a great show of support for live music near you even if there’s no way of knowing exactly when the pandemic will end.

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