Community//

How to Increase Your Resilience at Work

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a fifth of all workers consider their work as the number one stressors of their lives. The World Health Organization defines stress as the Public Health Crisis of the 21st Century. Many of us are now employed in continuously intertwined; ever-present, intensely stressful work environments where […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and though they are reviewed for adherence to our guidelines, they are submitted in their final form to our open platform. Learn more or join us as a community member!

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, a fifth of all workers consider their work as the number one stressors of their lives. The World Health Organization defines stress as the Public Health Crisis of the 21st Century. Many of us are now employed in continuously intertwined; ever-present, intensely stressful work environments where tension and the possibility of burnout are common. Since the pace and strength of contemporary work culture are unlikely to change, it is more necessary than ever to develop resilience skills to successfully manage your work life.

More than 50 years of studies highlight the fact that resilience is based on beliefs, habits and social reinforcement that can be accepted and maintained by anybody. Factors that contribute to resilience include positivity; the ability to remain calm and control intense or challenging emotions; a sense of wellbeing and a strong social support structure. The positive thing is that while there is a clear range of resilience-related habits and abilities, you will learn to be more robust.

However, developing resilient skills in the sense of contemporary work should not take place in a vacuum. It’s important to consider and control some of the reasons that make us feel so distracted and depressed at work. Our current work culture is a clear result of the growing challenges and demands that companies face globally.

It is evident that the stressful situations associated with the increasing pace and intensity of work are on the rise worldwide.

One key point to note is that not every anxiety is treated equally; there are even certain types of stress that can also have a beneficial impact on our fellow human-being and efficiency. Some kinds of stress can make us healthier, encourage us to be our best, and help us operate at peak levels. One useful way of thinking about this is to transfer anxiety on a bell-shaped curve. Having passed the highest point or high-performance peak where stress inspires us, we encounter the unhealthy impact of anxiety that, if managed sustainably, give rise not only to burnout and also to severe illness.

Stress that leads one to encounter discomfort or unhealthful strain—”distress”—is a significant cause of concern as it specifically and adversely impacts personal and company performance. 77% of highly depressed workers have showed an above-average level of fatigue and early warning signs of long-term burnout. Burnout is generally a lagging predictor of chronic stress.

But how do we build stamina and remain empowered in the face of chronic negative stress and ever-increasing pressures, uncertainty and change? Here are few ideas, focused on some of the most current neuroscience, behavioral and interpersonal research:

Practice awareness.

People in the corporate community are gradually turning their focus to mindfulness-associated behavioral health activities and with good cause. Analysis has shown that mindfulness increases decision consistency and insight-related problem-solving, mindfulness improves cognitive versatility. Mindfulness promotes job success even when accounting for all three aspects of work commitment – vigor, determination and concentration.

Share the mental burden.

We receive 11 million pieces of information per second, but executive brain processing centers can efficiently handle just 40 bits of information One realistic way to think about this is that while we can’t limit the amount of information we receive (in our inboxes, for example), we can compartmentalize our cognitive processes and simplify the way we interpret that information. Be mindful of compartmentalizing various types of job tasks, such as emailing, policy or brainstorming exercises and business-as usual gatherings.

A lot of the way you could build a dedicated opportunity for physical fitness in the middle of your day. This approach can be too regimented for others, but it provides an ideal collection of requirements for us to successfully interpret information and make quality choices while reducing cognitive loads and strains.

Taking detachment breaks

All throughout workday, it is important to pay attention to the peaks and valleys of energy and efficiency that we all undergo, what health psychology call our ultradian (hourly) rather than our circadian (daily) cycles. Mind concentration, awareness and energy periods are usually 90-120 minutes long, so it is helpful to walk away from our jobs for even a few minutes to refresh effort and focus.

Balancing work with a limited period away from these tasks will encourage greater vitality, mental stability, ingenuity and concentration, effectively increasing our resilient potential during the working day. The long-term benefit is that we save resources and avoid burns over days, weeks and months.

Build your mental resilience. It is possible — without that much effort — to simply transform the neural networks through which we handle the stress experience in order to respond rather than react to some challenging situation or person. This level of mental resilience relies on the capacity of psychologically “decent” stressors to handle them efficiently. “Dissenting” stress is not ignoring or avoiding the fact that we feel stressed — rather, it is the practice of being able to stop, evaluate the situation from a rational point of view, and then attempt to fix the problem. When we can cognitively take a step back from our experience and mark our thoughts and feelings, we have an impact.

Build your mental resilience. It’s indeed possible — without that much effort — to simply transform the neural networks through which we handle the stress experience in order to respond rather than react to some challenging situation or person. This level of mental resilience relies on the capacity of psychologically “decent” stressors to handle them efficiently. “Dissenting” stress is not ignoring or avoiding the fact that we feel stressed — rather, it is the practice of being able to stop, evaluate the situation from a rational point of view, and then attempt to fix the problem. When we can intellectually take a step back of our reality and mark our feelings and thoughts, we have an impact.

Cultivate sympathy.

One of the most underrated facets of the resilience skill set is the capacity to develop compassion — self-concern and kindness for others.

Empathy increases positive feelings, creates positive working relationships, and enhances coordination and interaction.

Sympathy cultivation activities improve enjoyment and well-being, and minimize tension. Compassion and the efficiency of business is not necessarily the same thing exclusive. Rather, employee, team and corporate success rely on a culture of caring practice. Ultimately, it can now be assumed that a large range of skills and attitudes that promote resilience throughout the workplace is a strong payoff.

Story by OR Locksmith Tucson who offers residential, commercial and automotive locksmith solutions to anyone in the Tucson area. We give timely, one-on-one support from genuine, professional technicians.

    Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

    You might also like...

    Community//

    What is Resilience & its Association with Brain

    by Hassan Bilal
    Photo by JoelValve on Unsplash
    Community//

    How to Amplify Your Resilience

    by Lisa Frost
    Raising children with love and care can lead to lifelong resilience to trauma
    Community//

    We Can Learn How To Cope from Trauma Professionals

    by Sylvial Paull

    Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

    Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Thrive Global
    People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

    - MARCUS AURELIUS

    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.