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How To Get A Better Night’s Sleep This Winter

2020 has been a monumental year so far and it is no wonder that people’s sleep has been negatively impacted by recent events; financial worry, childcare stress, loneliness and health concerns are all preventing the nation from nodding off.  With research revealing that the number of people suffering from insomnia and sleep problems has dramatically increased in […]

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2020 has been a monumental year so far and it is no wonder that people’s sleep has been negatively impacted by recent events; financial worry, childcare stress, loneliness and health concerns are all preventing the nation from nodding off. 

With research revealing that the number of people suffering from insomnia and sleep problems has dramatically increased in the past six months*, now could be the perfect time to find new and alternative ways to get a better night’s sleep. 

A new innovation in aiding sleep is to use frequency harmonisation as a means to encourage the brain to ‘retune’ to the slowest frequencies associated with relaxation and deep sleep.

A sleepDOT is a frequency harmoniser that features an intelligent low powered magnet programmed with Harmonic Interface (PHI) technology. The magnet – similar to a magnetic strip on a bank card – is enclosed in a sticker that can be attached to a bed, headboard or object close to the head of a bed  and emits a clever mix of soothing vibrations and natural frequencies that encourage the brain to slow down to the theta and delta frequencies of stage one and deep sleep.

Sleep is not just a matter of our bodies “turning off” for several hours, followed by our bodies “turning back on” when we awake. In fact, sleep is a very active state. Our bodies move frequently and our brain activity is even more varied than it is during the normal waking state.

We measure brain waves for daytime and sleep activity – the first stage of sleep is characterised by theta waves which are slower in frequency and amplitude than daytime (beta) and relaxed (alpha)  waves. Delta waves are associated with the deep sleep stage of sleep.

Technology’s role in poor sleep 

Reducing your EMF exposure is another way of helping to get a good night’s sleep, along with a bedtime routine.

It’s important to remember that not only are people experiencing higher stress levels, anxiety and worries since the pandemic, many of our homes have become our workplaces meaning an increase in wireless technology and resulting in people being ‘always on’ when it comes to devices.

Many of us are aware that the wireless devices that fill our homes have the potential to have a detrimental impact on sleep quality and turning off tablets, mobile phones and laptops at least 30 minutes before you go to sleep can help you sleep better. However, many people may not know that wireless devices emit low level radiation all day long, which could be damaging to health.

For specifically managing electro-magnetic radiation and electro-stress from wireless devices, a smartDOT can be attached to a Wi-Fi router, mobile phone, tablet, laptop, baby monitor or games console to retune the radiation emitted from the device directly at its source.

Like with the sleepDOT, the smartDOT uses sophisticated Programmed Harmonic Interface (PHI) technology as a means of retuning the EMF (electro-magnetic frequencies) emitted by wireless devices. The dot includes a low-powered magnet programmed with a specific, coherent, naturally occurring recipe of frequencies which harmonise the emissions to a more natural coherent frequency.  The body recognises the retuned emissions which reduces the effects of electro-stress.

Reported benefits include more energy, better mood and enhanced concentration plus reduced headaches, anxiety, and fatigue.

* Research funded by the Economic and Social Research Council and conducted by the University of Southampton, revealed that one in six people experienced sleep problems before the pandemic hit in March, compared to one in four after lockdown had been implemented. 

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