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How to Embrace Your Small Bust When Society Tells Us Bigger is Better

Although the much needed body positivity and self-love movement has taken off in the last year, there’s still opportunity to be even more inclusive with the types of bodies, genders, and personal preferences that are represented. Not one movement is more important than the other, and there is space for everyone to thrive and glow […]

Although the much needed body positivity and self-love movement has taken off in the last year, there’s still opportunity to be even more inclusive with the types of bodies, genders, and personal preferences that are represented. Not one movement is more important than the other, and there is space for everyone to thrive and glow up. 

Why is it so difficult to obsess over the things we love about our body rather than the things we want to change?

One audience that has been massively misunderstood and ignored is small-chested women. We still see jokes and insults aimed at women with small busts in pop culture and media. For example, if you watched Crazy Rich Asians, you might have noticed not one, but two, derogatory comments regarding small boobs. Being “flat” is still something women can be embarrassed about, and most bra companies think if you’re small then you want a push-up bra to look bigger. 

For small-chested women, the struggle to love one’s body usually starts around puberty. During this time, it can feel like body image and desirability is tied to how big your cup size is. As you get older, this is further exacerbated by all the movies and TV shows that make fun of small busts and reinforce that this body type is unfeminine, unsexy, and unattractive. It’s time to end these false beauty standards that brands like Victoria’s Secret have perpetuated for too long. Small, big, and everything in between is beautiful.

The woman with this body type is not less-than despite what society’s body standards might portray. She can be just as bold, amazing, smart, ambitious, and gorgeous as anyone else, and a her cup size doesn’t determine her worth. This is applicable for all women and all size related insecurities that have been instilled in us. 

How to find self love and promote body confidence?

Understand that your physical appearance doesn’t define you.

It’s hard to not let our outward appearances affect how we view our internal selves, but this is one of the most important realizations in removing the limitations around achieving self love. You are so much more than how you look, and the best parts about you aren’t even the ones that most people can visibly see. A practice to help embrace these attributes is to think through and write down what you love about yourself and to focus on the things that truly make you YOU, and it might become obvious that it has nothing to do with the way you look. 

Find undergarments that were designed to fit and flatter your body.

Most traditional bra companies design using the industry standard 36C size, then scale that design up or down. Meaning if you are any smaller or bigger than that industry standard size, that design wasn’t meant for you. For small-chested women, this leads to fit issues like not being able to fill in the cups, heavily padded push-up bras, and strapless bras that fall down. Look for brands that specialize in certain sizes rather than brands that try to cater to every body type. Wearing garments that fit perfectly can make a world’s difference in not only comfort, but how confident you feel in them. 

Validate your’s and everyone’s personal stories.

Everyone has their own unique story and body image issues they struggle with, and not one issue is more valid than another. It is only when we are able to empathize with one another we are able to rally together and push society forward for positive change. Listen with compassion and it will also allow yourself to feel more compassion regarding your own views on body image as well.

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