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How to Decorate for an Anxiety-Free Apartment

You can reduce stress and anxiety by transforming your home into a tranquil environment. Conditions such as stress, PTSD and depression affect millions of Americans. You can offset the pressures of a fast-paced world by making your home a relaxing sanctuary. You should seek professional help if you’re struggling with your emotional health. Still, you […]

doorway of a nicely decorated apartment

You can reduce stress and anxiety by transforming your home into a tranquil environment.

Conditions such as stress, PTSD and depression affect millions of Americans. You can offset the pressures of a fast-paced world by making your home a relaxing sanctuary.

You should seek professional help if you’re struggling with your emotional health. Still, you can complement your physician’s treatment by making your home more amenable.

By making a few changes, you can use the place where you spend most of your time to improve your emotional well-being.

Home Sweet Home

Life is challenging, especially for veterans transitioning from service to civilian life. A considerable number of enlisted personnel grapples with memories of traumatic events.

When soldiers return home, that trauma can persist and contribute to conditions such as posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). In addition, the sudden transition from following a strict schedule to freedom to do as they please can also prove jarring.

If you or a loved one struggles with PTSD, you can try to make home life more agreeable by creating a pleasing environment. Changes may include moderate cost-effective upgrades that create an atmosphere that alleviates stress and anxiety. With the right interior scheme, you can indeed turn your home into a sanctuary.

Let There Be Light!

Seasonal affective disorder (SAD) is a common condition that settles in among people in the fall and typically extends into the winter. During these seasons, people receive less exposure to light and vitamin D. Studies show that vitamin D deficiency can contribute to depression.

Seasonal changes also affect peoples’ natural sleeping and waking cycles, which is called the circadian rhythm. Your circadian rhythm controls your biological clock, brain activity and hormone production.

When SAD settles in, light therapy may help. Bright light can help you regulate melatonin as well as other hormones affected by your circadian rhythm.

Dawn simulators, lightboxes and natural spectrum light bulbs can help you shine a light on “SAD-ness” and find a little joy in the world. However, people who physicians have diagnosed with emotional disorders should consult their doctor before attempting any intervention.

Visual Cues that Create a Happy Home

Cheerful colors can improve your overall well-being. One creative and cost-effective way to gain a new lease on life is to add color to your home. In the bedroom, for instance, try to design the interior with a minimum of 20% of your favorite colors, rather than using solely neutral tones.

Color theory is the science of designing interiors that promote emotional health. Holistic interior design can also encompass lighting fixtures and natural light as well as interior sound profile. Overall, color theory and holistic interior design are the studies of structural features that mentally reinforce vitality and reduce anxiety.

As an example, individuals who’ve experienced the loss of a loved one might avoid pictures depicting human forms.  Instead, they might stick to art that portrays flora and fauna or natural landscapes. At the same time, window treatments that let in plenty of natural light could help to boost one’s spirits.

Get Organized to Reduce Anxiety

A disorganized home can reduce your ability to remain focused and productive while at the same time increasing your anxiety. Clutter, ultimately, can create stress.

Often, clutter results from too many possessions and not enough space. It can also result solely from not having enough time to stay organized.

However, possessions aren’t the root of the problem. Society places substantial importance on belongings. As a result, cultural norms make it hard to resist stockpiling massive collections of things.

For instance, American parents give birth to 3% of all children but purchase 40% of the world’s toys. A cluttered house, however, can sap your energy, leaving you feeling drained, anxious and overwhelmed.

A Bright, New Perspective

According to the Veterans Administration, physicians diagnose nearly 20% of returning soldiers with PTSD and approximately 30% of all adults with anxiety. A significant portion of the population could use a mood makeover via a new interior theme.

It’s important not to overwhelm yourself with an extensive renovation project. Remember, the goal is to reduce stress, so start small. Make a few changes here and there, and you’ll eventually reach your goal of creating a soothing home environment. In time, you’ll fend off anxiety, depression and stress.

The idea of creating a balanced home environment is not new. Feng Shui is a Chinese art form that’s existed for approximately 3,000 years. It’s the art of creating a home environment that positively affects your mood and well-being. Modern science supports many of the principles of this ancient art.

When your home is comfortable, you’ll feel energized and optimistic. Whether you choose to use scientific principles or Feng Shui, you can create a home environment that exudes positive energy. A personalized combination of therapeutic color and light may be just what you need to cope with the harsh realities of the world.

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