How to Better Understand Grief

When your loved one passes on, you will have a lot of love to give but nobody to give it to. Many people will tell you that things will get better with time, making you hopeful. What no one tells you is that before you heal, things will get incredibly worse. Understanding that grief comes […]

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When your loved one passes on, you will have a lot of love to give but nobody to give it to. Many people will tell you that things will get better with time, making you hopeful. What no one tells you is that before you heal, things will get incredibly worse. Understanding that grief comes in waves and knowing other grief-related facts makes it easier for you when things get rough. 

Prepare for Looping Thoughts

Your brain will take you on bizarre trips after someone you know dies. You may often be trapped within a chain of emotions, actions, and thoughts on repeat mode. It happens when you think about distressing or troubling events and can’t let go. That’s why it is a good idea to give out the deceased’s clothes. It will help you to get in terms with the loss.

You Can’t Go Back

Getting over a loved one’s death does not mean that you will start feeling the same way you did before they passed on or that you will be the same person you were. Unfortunately, that is impossible. Death cuts across all life’s aspects and divides it into “after” and “before” sections. You need to treasure the before part while not holding on to the memories too tightly. 

 Don’t Forget to Cry When You Need To

While this sounds basic, it is vital when going through the grief process. Culturally, we aren’t in a place where you can burst into tears whenever you feel like it. Sadly, holding it in is bad for your health. Sometimes the effect of the sadness shows up as chronic pain that physiotherapy and massage can’t fix. 

Time Doesn’t Heal All Wounds

Hoping that time will help you get over the pain of your loved one’s death is a futile mission. Unlike popular opinion, time doesn’t heal all wounds. It is like assuming that a finger will grow back because you want it to. It would help if you did more, like going to therapy or moving out of the old house. 

Everything Doesn’t Happen for A Reason

Many of your friends will comfort you that everything happens for a reason. Although they mean well, it is very infuriating. Sometimes terrible things happen for no purpose. Don’t waste time trying to figure out the cause when there is none. Instead, focus on your healing. 

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