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How To Be Shame-Proof (In A Good Way)…

Someone I know is a contractor, running a client-based business.  One of his clients has an assistant who handles correspondence between her boss and the contractor. She sees how much money her boss pays to the contractor every week.  Apparently, this assistant got the idea that she could collect some of this money for herself. So she’s set up a service-based […]

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How To Be Shame-Proof (In A Good Way)... Dre Baldwin DreAllDay.com

Someone I know is a contractor, running a client-based business. 

One of his clients has an assistant who handles correspondence between her boss and the contractor. She sees how much money her boss pays to the contractor every week. 

Apparently, this assistant got the idea that she could collect some of this money for herself. So she’s set up a service-based business, offering the same service that the contractor offers. And now she’s attempting to undercut (and cut out) the contractor by turning her current boss into her first business client. 

Client-stealing. Happens in the service industry all the time. I’m not saying it’s right — I’m saying that it happens. And it’s not going away.

The contractor, realizing what’s happening, drew a parallel to what’s happening to him to the movie The Founder. The 2016 movie depicts (and argues) that Ray Kroc stole the McDonald’s concept from the McDonald brothers after whom the business is named. 

The contractor shared this scenario with me. I told him that while this is surely unethical, it’s not illegal. Which means that someone can do it to you, and there’s nothing you can do, legally-speaking, to stop it. 

Your only recourse is to appeal to people’s ethics and sense of do-the-right-thing-ness. It’s quite effective when you have the right verbiage and the right people to use it on. 

One thing, though: Some people can’t be shamed. 

Donald Trump has dominated political headlines ever since coming onto the scene. One major reason: he doesn’t operate by the same rules as other politicians. 

He says what they won’t say (good example: his “what do you have to lose?” pre-election appeal to Black voters). He attacks the lesser-known critics whom other presidents would ignore. When Trump detractors accuse him of stirring up, allowing or representing the negativity of American citizens, he doesn’t bother defending himself. 

The appeal to ethics and being the better person — or the appearance of it, more accurately — is the common understanding of politics. Politicians still haven’t figured out how to fight against a guy who doesn’t play by those rules. 

To be clear: being shame-proof isn’t necessarily a bad thing. 

Losers have a choice: Work On Your Game so you can start winning, or play the victim and claim unfairness to explain your failure. Many choose the latter, for various reasons. 

My younger cousin tried shaming me for beating up on her in video games when we were kids. I hadn’t cheated; I was simply better than her. Should I have been sorry for winning? 

Here’s how you can use this concept, from both ends. 

1) Deal with ethical people whose high sense of self prevents them from doing snake shit. This practice will solve a lot of problems before they even happen. 

2) Find people who understand the fairness of the game: sometimes you win and sometimes you lose, but the game treats everyone equally. 

Anyone who can’t handle losing with the same grace as they have when winning will become a problem. 

3) Check yourself for any traces of victim mentality. This often shows itself in folks when they’re behind in the race. Maybe your opponents are better than you. Perhaps you were unprepared for what you’re facing. Maybe it’s just plain bad luck over you right now. 

Be very careful of painting yourself a victim every time things don’t work in your favor. This is a chronic disease that spreads faster then COVID. 

The first step in winning is becoming the ideal version of yourself. For that, claim your free copy of The Mirror Of Motivation and watch how the same actions from before produce completely different results. 

Get it here: http://MirrorOfMotivation.com 

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