How to Avoid (and Manage) Common Work Stressors Associated with Migraine

In and of itself, chronic migraine in the workplace tanks productivity and makes work difficult. Here are 5 things you should do to reclaim your work life back from migraine.

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Migraines aren’t just an “excuse” to get out of work. Attacks make it extremely hard to focus, work, or even sit under your office’s fluorescent lighting. (Who thought that fluorescent lighting was a good choice?)

Unfortunately, not all migraines start before work. Many start during the workday – there are tons of stressors that can be found in every office.

No one wants to get to work just to experience migraine stressors and then have to leave early. Use these tips to avoid common stressors at work and manage these triggers to prevent migraines from ruining your day.

Skip the Coffee (And Happy Hour)

Let’s start with the beginning of the workday. Caffeine can help some people avoid a headache, but other people are triggered by caffeinated drinks. Ask for decaf at work or switch to water. There’s nothing wrong with extra hydration.

Alcoholic beverages can also trigger migraines. It’s fun to head to happy hour after work, but it’s not fun to have to drive home with a throbbing migraine.

Get Into a Routine

If you have a 9-5, getting to bed and getting up at the same time isn’t a hard task. For people with unusual schedules, however, getting into a routine is crucial to preventing migraines. Getting too much sleep or too little sleep can trigger a migraine.

Have a crazy schedule? Talk to your boss about getting more consistent shifts. Many people with migraines feel guilty about calling in sick or asking anything of their boss to accommodate their migraines, but it’s important to remember that your health comes first.

Take Your Lunch Break

Don’t work through lunch! Even though certain foods trigger migraines (specifically salty or aged foods,) skipping a meal may also cause a migraine to creep up on you. Don’t let the pressures of work keep you from missing a meal. Even if you have to have lunch at your desk, have your lunch.

Avoid Light Fatigue from Fluorescent lights

Harmful light is one of the most common triggers of migraine – but unfortunately, it’s also one of the hardest to avoid. Bright lights, sudden changes in light, and the glaring sun can all cause a migraine. And don’t get us started about the terrible fluorescent lighting in every office.

Luckily, scientists have found a way to filter the most harmful forms of light with light sensitivity glasses. Light sensitivity glasses (also known as FL-41 glasses) use tinted lenses to block certain rays of light that seem to be harmful and triggering. And did we mention that the rose tint is super in style right now?

Avoid Your Boss

Okay, this isn’t so easy to do. But if the sight of your boss (or maybe just an annoying colleague) causes you extra stress, your chances of getting a migraine will spike. Stress of all types can trigger migraines. Give yourself the gift of a few minutes of meditation throughout the day to keep a clear, calm head.

Or, you can just use your migraines as an excuse to never speak to your boss again.

Migraines don’t have to keep you from getting work done, but in order to live with migraines, you will have to make some efforts to avoid triggers. Keep track of the things that trigger you most in order to have a productive, migraine-free day, every day.

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