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How to Affect Stress Management to Our Body

Stress management refers to the wide spectrum of techniques and psychotherapies aimed at controlling a person’s levels of stress, especially chronic stress, usually for the purpose of improving everyday functioning. In order to develop an effective stress management programmed it is first necessary to identify the factors that are central to a person controlling his/her stress, and […]

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Stress management refers to the wide spectrum of techniques and psychotherapies aimed at controlling a person’s levels of stress, especially chronic stress, usually for the purpose of improving everyday functioning. In order to develop an effective stress management programmed it is first necessary to identify the factors that are central to a person controlling his/her stress, and to identify the intervention methods which effectively target these factors.

Stress affects the body. Physical signs of stress include:

-Headaches

-Back pain

-Problems sleeping

-Upset stomach

-Weight gain or loss

-Tense muscles

-Frequent or more serious colds

A few minutes of practice per day can help in stress management. “Research suggests that daily meditation may alter the brain’s neural pathways, making you more resilient to stress,” When a person is under stress, their breathing pattern changes. Typically, an anxious person takes small, shallow breaths, using their shoulders rather than their diaphragm to move air in and out of their lungs. This style of breathing disrupts the balance of gases in the body.

Shallow over-breathing, or hyperventilation, can prolong feelings of anxiety by making the physical symptoms of stress worse. Controlling your breathing can help to improve some of these symptoms.

Sit comfortably and raise your ribcage to expand your chest. Place one hand on your chest and the other on your abdomen. Take notice of how your upper chest and abdomen are moving while you breathe. Concentrate on your breath and try to gently breathe in and out through the nose. Your upper chest and stomach should be still, allowing the diaphragm to work more efficiently with your abdomen rather than your chest.

With each breath, allow any tension in your body to slip away. Once you are breathing slowly and with your abdomen, sit quietly and enjoy the sensation of physical relaxation.

It’s simple. Sit up straight with both feet on the floor. Close your eyes. Focus your attention on reciting — out loud or silently — a positive mantra such as “I feel at peace” or “I love myself.” Place one hand on your belly to sync the mantra with your breaths. Let any distracting thoughts float by like clouds. Pace you throughout the day, taking regular breaks from work or other structured activities. Try mindfulness meditation. Limit (or eliminate) the use of stimulants like caffeine, which can elevate the stress response in your body. Plan leisure activities to break up your schedule. Find humor in your life. Laughter can be a great tension-reducer. Spend time close to nature, near trees and a lot of plantation.

Remember, a twenty minute walk has been proven to be a better tranquilizer than some prescription drugs.

‘It isn’t stress that make us fall- it’s how we respond to the stressful events’-Wayde Goodall

Without stress management, all too often your body is always on high alert. Over time, high levels of stress lead to serious health problems. Don’t wait until stress has a negative impact on your health, relationships or quality of life. Start practicing a range of stress management techniques today. Oxy Break is specially designed for your comfort and stress management. It soothes your nerves and relieves all your worries, vanishing stress and making you lively. It has series of breathing techniques that make you exhale all your tension. You can learn more about techniques for stress management here.

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