How Smart Entrepreneurs Use Failure To Their Advantage and Become More Successful

Entrepreneurs learn challenges. They struggle 90 percent of the time, and ambitious entrepreneurs realize that failure is something they may need to constantly tackle. It’s not easy to transform an idea into a reality, but true entrepreneurs don’t need it to be. I realize good growth is an experiment in innovation — and loss. Through […]

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Entrepreneurs learn challenges. They struggle 90 percent of the time, and ambitious entrepreneurs realize that failure is something they may need to constantly tackle.

It’s not easy to transform an idea into a reality, but true entrepreneurs don’t need it to be. I realize good growth is an experiment in innovation — and loss.

Through practice, I know that entrepreneurship is not about being brilliant; it’s about adjusting and becoming resilient. Yet knowing how to be strong cannot come easily for anyone and it really starts with the mindset.

The correct Mentality

Adapting is crucial to performance, and essential to resilience. Studies suggest that learning when it is difficult is most successful. In reaction to problems the brain actually expands. From studying as a small child to shielding the brain from ageing, improving oneself is important. A productive and rewarding existence emerges through a mentality of development, one that is always searching for a challenge.

The unavoidable failures may feel overwhelming with a predetermined mentality, where something needs to function in a certain manner (i.e., be perfect). And you are equipped to tackle obstacles with an increasing mentality.

Therefore we will look at difficulties and barriers as opportunities to develop and know. Our single server failure was terrible, sure, but it also built up my resilience (and trained me to invest in an automatic backup). Yet resilience doesn’t only benefit from failure; it has an emotional dimension to it.

Growing resilience

I think of the emotional aspect of resilience as the “heart set” of an individual. It’s the balance of having the correct feelings — the right heart set — in the right mentality that’s essential to resilience.

Here are three techniques to help you grow this prime blend to be resilient:

1. Be Sharp

Create the correct mentality by pushing yourself to achieve growth and resilience. In every personal and professional situation ask yourself, “What can I learn from this? .A mindset which increases productivity, no matter the circumstance, is essential in a rapidly changing world. For example if you are a musician and struggling to get his videos being viewed on YouTube channel, you can seek help from companies or platforms like The Marketing Heaven that offer YouTube views to grow your popularity. Though, everybody puts numerous videos out there that it’s problematic to get yours to being noticed. You need to think sharply in order to get noticed quickly hence creating productivity.

2. Create sharp tactics ahead of Time

The secret to performance is self-control; ensure you have the tools in place to better handle your sensations. If you are on the brink of a meltdown, making the correct individual listening to you in a situation will offer useful insight and reassurance. Always ensure you have connections to someone (or several individuals) that will be there for you.

3. Don’t wait for Hurdles

Build resilience in the face of obstacles. Develop difficult situations for yourself and the colleagues such that the whole company is continually exercising their adaptability and developing it.

When you hesitate before a situation occurs to bring your mutual endurance into action, you may not do as well as though you were well versed. There’s a justification for there being emergency exercises. Allow the colleagues to fall back difficulties and leave unaffected.

The day my organization lost all the data was one of the hardest days in my life — I realized the firm didn’t survive without the archive. We could have been folding right there, making an excuse and running from disaster. Yet we haven’t.

What challenges have made your team and you even more resilient?

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