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How Much Oxygen Does My Brain Need?

Health When we arrive in this world, the first thing that we do is gasp for air. As we grow into adults and life gets busier and more stressful, pollution and artificially created O2 make the air we breathe not optimal for our bodies.  Thanks to plant-based sources, we can add oxygen to our body through […]

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Health

When we arrive in this world, the first thing that we do is gasp for air.

As we grow into adults and life gets busier and more stressful, pollution and artificially created O2 make the air we breathe not optimal for our bodies. 

Thanks to plant-based sources, we can add oxygen to our body through our diet to increase the quality of oxygen in our blood and strengthen our immune system. What does this mean?

The oxygen on an airplane is artificially made, therefore during a flight we are prone to jet-lag, dehydration and headaches. 

One of the best places to get quality air is from the outdoors. In nature we can breath better, we are more awake and alert, and therefore, we are happier. All of that happens because the quality of oxygen is much better when we are not confined to small spaces. 

To increase and improve the quality and the quantity of oxygen in our blood we need good amounts of chlorophyll. Leafy greens carry lots of oxygen in them, the darker the better. Kale is the best of all.

Some superfoods bring your oxygen levels up. Microalgaes such as Chlorella adds oxygen to our bloodstream, which spreads through our body and  brain, keeping us safe from all those bad side effects mentioned earlier.

Not only is adding oxygen to your daily life important, consider adding structure, or things to do during the day.  Humans are prone to develop mental issues such as negative thinking, depression and compulsive behaviors or anxiety without routines.

Three things need to happen to create a new healthy routine.

  • Make a committed decision about what you want to change.  
  • Plan what it is, in writing, this makes it more real, and helps you stay accountable.
  • Take consistent action towards it. Your actions can be small, but they need to be intentional.

When we create a new healthy habit it takes time to get used to it. Don’t be discouraged if you miss one or two, three or more days, it will catch on. Catch yourself and go back to the new routine as soon as you stray from it.  Our brain only learns by repetition. Remember when you were a baby and learned how to walk, you fell so many times but you didn’t get discouraged. You got up and tried again. This is how your brain works. You might fall off but you go back on track as soon as you catch yourself, repeat daily until it sticks.

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