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How Margo Benge Has Shaken Up How People Look At The Lymphatic System

“Through God, all things are possible.” I do not give up. I may recognize a path is not worth my time and energy to pursue, and change — but obstacles sit in my mind like a pinball machine, and I am constantly bombarding for solutions to achieve my goals. If one doesn’t try I look […]

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“Through God, all things are possible.” I do not give up. I may recognize a path is not worth my time and energy to pursue, and change — but obstacles sit in my mind like a pinball machine, and I am constantly bombarding for solutions to achieve my goals. If one doesn’t try I look for another. I also recognize that possible doesn’t mean intended, and believe that my path is under control for the greater good, especially when it isn’t clear to me why it’s blocked!


Asa part of our series about women who are shaking things up in their industry, I had the pleasure of interviewing Margo Benge.

Margo Benge is a researcher, educator, practitioner and publisher. The work she has done for the last 20 years allowed her to develop new methodologies which are not commonly practiced in her field — except for those who she has taught. At 65, her innate curiosity and optimism has her on a continual path for new discoveries.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

There are two paths to cite — one, massage, generally, and two, lymphatics, specifically. I was literally pushed into massage by a woman owning a spa. She had noted my uncanny ability to correct problems on herself and her family. Interestingly enough, I was also educated in classic lymphatic drainage at the same time (Vodder). As I look back at my total lack of training in any form of biology, I remember the first time I saw a picture of the lymphatic system. I looked at the woman sharing and said, “That continues into the feet and hands.” She raised her eyebrows but confirmed I was correct.

Can you tell our readers what it is about the work you’re doing that’s disruptive?

Almost as long as the lymphatic system has been observed — well over 200 years, it has been taught that all lymph drains to the thoracic duct. My paper disproving that was published in 2019.

We all need a little help along the journey — who have been some of your mentors? Can you share a story about how they made an impact?

In 2011, I was attending an AMTA conference in Ft. Worth when I met Daniel Herlihy. I observed him, he observed me, and we and another gentleman there were hysterically laughing as we worked together. I learned later he was a former osteopath and had been the victim of severe brain injury. We both started a friendship that continues to this day. Daniel visited and we mentored each other. One move he did intrigued me, and I asked him why. He said he was stimulating the lymphatic system — but he was doing it in a way I had not seen done before. Near the same time, Daniel decided I was going with him to a course at MD Anderson on Oncology massage. While at the conference, I listened to a speaker who obviously knew more about lymphatics than I did.

I began an extensive review of all the information I could find about the DEEPER lymphatic system and it made sense to me to stimulate it. As I dug in and practiced — initially driven by the belief it would be effective in weight loss (a long term case study verified this), I ended up with questions. Several months following the conference, I asked Dr. Hiroo Suami if he would meet with me, and he agreed.

I had a crash course in a few hours on what to study as we swapped ideas. He didn’t realize the lymphatic system was easier to find on someone who was overweight. He suggested new places to explore on the body. Many of the books he recommended were out of my price range, but I ordered a few and went searching for something more in my price range. A copy of an ancient medical text was at Half-priced books and actually had a few pictures from an even older medical text by Paolo Mascagni, who developed a methodology mixing mercury with some unknown other items, allowing the lymphatic system to solidify, and then producing incredible art of the cadavers. To this day, no one has successfully imaged the lymphatic system as well as Mascagni. I used what I had and spent years fine-tuning deeper lymphatic drainage (Accelerated Lymphatic Drainage Massage).

Later, as I began to believe there had to be other routes, I shared a picture of the route I had spotted with Dr. Valeska Wells. Dr. Wells confirmed it, and also allowed me to utilize her equipment, at no charge, to continue research that assisted the professional article.

Can you share 3 of the best words of advice you’ve gotten along your journey? Please give a story or example for each.

“Write a book.” As I learned about the lack of availability of Mascagni’s work and the cost of the lack of that information, I did write a book: “Lymphatic Anatomy — Ancient Art, New Directions,” so that that information could be seen by any medical expert or someone with a strong interest in lymphatics.

An answer to the question of an acupuncturist — “what is that point?” I had already been clearing sinuses for quite some time — colds, allergies, asthma. One place, in particular, was pivotal. When I asked and was told “lung” it pivoted me into recognizing the parallels between the lymphatic routes I had learned to recognize and Chinese medicine. Eventually, I enlisted Dr, Bing You’s assistance — he is trained in both Eastern and Western Medicine, to overlay the meridians onto Mascagni’s art.

“As long as you don’t have a Ph.D., medical professionals are not going to listen to you.” I have historically done work that has been pivotal across a wide spectrum of conditions, and most of my outreach to physicians has fallen on deaf ears. It didn’t matter how well I documented what was done., I find it a horrific challenge to get the information to the very people who need it the most. But I am stubborn, and the effect of this understanding has me constantly reviewing ways to change that.

How are you going to shake things up next?

I continue to do research in new and exciting applications. My hope is to continue to publish that information in a wide spectrum of medical journals.

Do you have a book/podcast/talk that’s had a deep impact on your thinking? Can you share a story with us?

“Outliers: The story of success” was given to me by my son. I have looked back and seen how exact opportunities have been provided to me and learned the amount of time invested has resulted in my continued refinement and development. The 10,000 hours’ rule is definitely in play!

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I have specific goals in mind which I hope to actualize. As I continue to do research, my goal will be to (1) document and prove that certain conditions have specific protocols (2) teach others to do those protocols so I can continue on to the next research project, allowing them to touch multiple lives for the better and (3) elevate medical practices to a higher level by a greater understanding of the lymphatic system.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Through God, all things are possible.” I do not give up. I may recognize a path is not worth my time and energy to pursue, and change — but obstacles sit in my mind like a pinball machine, and I am constantly bombarding for solutions to achieve my goals. If one doesn’t try I look for another. I also recognize that possible doesn’t mean intended, and believe that my path is under control for the greater good, especially when it isn’t clear to me why it’s blocked!

How can our readers follow you on social media?

The two best options are — www.thecreatorschannel.com, and facebook.com/LymphaticAnatomy/.

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

It has been my privilege.

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