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How Learning and Working Help Improve Your Mental Health

Continuing your education and working at something you love are the two most beneficial ways to treat mental health issues like depression and anxiety. Why? Well, classes and workplaces are great spots for meeting other people with similar interests and there’s a great chance that your efforts will result in economic betterment (loneliness and bad […]

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How Learning and Working Help Improve Your Mental Health

Continuing your education and working at something you love are the two most beneficial ways to treat mental health issues like depression and anxiety. Why? Well, classes and workplaces are great spots for meeting other people with similar interests and there’s a great chance that your efforts will result in economic betterment (loneliness and bad financial situation often trigger mental health problems). People mostly think that learning is reserved only for children and young adults, but it’s great for adults too. Besides the possibility of getting a better job position, learning various things is connected to reduction of dementia, depression, anxiety and loneliness. Even though working too much can leave negative consequences to people’s mental health, a healthy amount of work is very beneficial. So how do learning and working really affect and improve your mental health?

Mental health and learning

Many research efforts show that learning and continuing to learn throughout your life can result in better life satisfaction and optimism and improved ability to enjoy life to the fullest.

People who continue to get educated and learn long after their childhoods report better general wellbeing and greater stress-coping abilities. Many of them also have better self-esteem and stronger purpose and feelings of hope.

But why is that? Well, experts think that setting little learning goals and achieving them creates positive feelings that affect a person’s self-esteem. Additionally, learning often involves interaction with various people. Interaction with others increases our wellbeing through building and strengthening social bonds.

How can you learn your whole life?

First, it’s a great idea to start thinking about learning in a broader sense. This will help you make learning a bigger and more important part of your life, no matter how old you are. You can start your education with formal classes and courses, especially if you love structure and wish to expand your social circle or want to move forward in your career.

If you’re not a native English speaker, you can enrol in some English classes and improve everything from your vocabulary to your pronunciation. If you pick the right school that offers PTE coaching, you can even get private feedback, private consultations and all the preparation materials that you need. PTE certificates will not only help you improve your English, but also open many other opportunities that involve living, working or studying in an English-speaking country.

However, you can also choose a different path and opt for non-formal learning. For example, you might try to improve your cooking by preparing various new dishes at home or you can hit a museum or a gallery and broaden your views on a certain topic or historical person. Learning how to fix your bike or repair a broken gate also counts. There are hundreds of online tutorials that can help you with all sorts of DIY projects and allow you to learn new skills.

Mental health and work

Going back to work is very important for people who suffer from depression and anxiety. While overworking can be terrible for mental health, moderate and controlled amounts of work are very beneficial. Work not only gives you routine and structure, but it also allows people to re-establish their self-worth and boost their confidence.

However, it’s really important to have a good and understanding boss who’s flexible. For instance, businesses suffer a £40 billion loss in Britain just because employees take days off work due to depression and anxiety. This means that every year, one in four workers develops mental health problems that will cause them to claim sickness benefits. The way you experience your job and the way you return to it after sick leave is very important for your mental health.

How can you return to work?

While returning to work helps with recovery, it’s important to do it right. Having good health services and psychological support at work is crucial to your quick return to employment after battling depression and anxiety. Employers who are sympathetic and flexible are truly the key. Some specialists recommend a gradual return to work and say that that approach brings best results. If you can, ask for reduced work hours for the first few weeks of you being back in the office and increase your work hours until you’re fully back. Having managers who care and come to check up on you can also do wonders for mental health. It shows that you’re a valuable part of the team which is great for self-esteem and overall work satisfaction. But, all things considered, going back to work after a break can give you structure and allow you to take your mind off things.

Learning and working are crucial parts of human lives, so make sure to practice both as much as you can. Going back to work and taking up some sort of additional education can help your recovery from anxiety and depression and give you a wonderful life purpose to concentrate on.

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