Community//

How Julie Herzog Is Shaking Up the Legal Industry

I would inspire a movement of acceptance, love, and support for people with special needs. As a mom of a daughter with cerebral palsy and brain damage, I see a culture that oftentimes is afraid of people with these types of challenges and shuns them. I think that is largely due to a lack of […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and though they are reviewed for adherence to our guidelines, they are submitted in their final form to our open platform. Learn more or join us as a community member!

I would inspire a movement of acceptance, love, and support for people with special needs. As a mom of a daughter with cerebral palsy and brain damage, I see a culture that oftentimes is afraid of people with these types of challenges and shuns them. I think that is largely due to a lack of knowledge or understanding and a feeling of inability to relate. It is said that many people with special needs never even leave their own homes. I would enlighten the world about the glorious gifts these people, in particular, have to offer.


As a part of our series about women who are shaking things up in their industry, I had the pleasure of interviewing Julie Herzog, Owner Principal, and Partner at Fortis Law Partners.

As head of the corporate/securities practice, Julie Herzog handles a wide variety of corporate, securities and merger and acquisition transactions. She has handled transactions valued at over $4 billion for major public companies and investment banks and enjoys working with a diverse clientele ranging from Fortune 100 corporations to startups, family offices, and venture capital and private equity funds. In the last six years, Julie negotiated and closed over 75 transactions valued at over $1.5 billion on behalf of our clients. Her clients represent a variety of industry sectors, including energy, health care, technology, manufacturing, real estate, food and beverage, business consulting and other services. She has counseled several hundred companies from inception through initial public offerings or successful sales.

Before joining the firm in 2003, Julie practiced corporate and securities law for more than eight years at major international law firms, Morrison & Foerster’s Denver and Hong Kong offices and Jones Day’s Chicago office. In 2004, she started her own clothing business, grew the business over three years and successfully sold it in 2007. Her experience managing the entire lifecycle of a business adds value to her work with clients.

Each client has varying demands and requirements and Julie has earned a reputation for respecting the unique qualities of each of her clients. Her approach is refreshingly down-to-earth as she meets her clients’ business objectives, while appropriately addressing the legal and business risks. Having been on both sides of the desk, she understands the importance of timeliness, efficiency and other factors that create quality customer service — and that is what she delivers.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

My first internship in law school was at an international law firm. I was tasked with putting together a development plan for a new neighborhood near Dallas/Fort Worth. I had become a lawyer largely because I loved to help people, advocate for what I thought was right and be a creative, dynamic thinker. This was the first time I realized that lawyers put deals together for their clients as before then what I saw on TV and in law school was about general business law concepts or criminal, tort or family law. As I figured out how to put together all the parcels of land my client needed to buy and address various land use issues, I got very excited as I had to think creatively, use my book and street smarts and present the proposed development in an easy to see and understandable method. I was hooked on being a deal lawyer.

Can you tell our readers what it is about the work you’re doing that’s disruptive?

I thank my father to this day for encouraging me to get an accounting degree in college as I use it every day. Because of that degree and having founded and built companies, I am able to help clients build business strategies and models that will be successful in the near and long term. We started a sister consulting company last year to offer this critical business and financial services in partnership with our law firm because both aspects are critical to the success of our clients. Having structured and negotiated hundreds of transactions, I can leverage that experience to assist each of our clients on a variety of projects in multiple industries in very effective and highly lucrative ways, while minimizing risk.

We all need a little help along the journey — who have been some of your mentors? Can you share a story about how they made an impact?

My biggest mentor has been Erika Brown who now runs Paltown/Colontown, a community for colon cancer patients and survivors. I first met Erika over 20 years ago when she ran a non-profit called NetGoddess as we both had a passion for helping women executives succeed. I attended a NetGoddess meeting of women executives in several different industries, and these women opened their hearts, minds and souls to each other as they shared their journeys. My career path before then had been very much focused on my intellectual abilities. I learned from Erika that bringing my heart and soul to each client is oftentimes even more important. I am not just an attorney; I am a counselor.

Can you share 3 of the best words of advice you’ve gotten along your journey? Please give a story or example for each.

  1. Nothing is black and white. Everything is a mixture of multiple colors on the spectrum. I view part of my role as being able to see as many aspects of the key points in any deal negotiation as possible to enable me to structure and negotiate win/win deals for all parties.
  2. All meaning is assigned. Facts are just facts. Every story we ascribe to any given situation is just that — a story built on our unique perspective. I learned this in PSI leadership courses. I have had clients who get in disputes with business partners and come in with long stories about what happened, ascribing lots of meaning and significance to who did what and why. I boil it down to the pure facts and offer multiple perspectives, which then can open the client’s mind up to lots of possibilities and oftentimes win/win solutions for everyone.
  3. There are many paths to achieve a goal. Often, when we set our intentions, solutions show up in ways we may not have thought of or expected. Staying open to possibility is the key.

How are you going to shake things up next?

I plan to continue to expand the depth and breadth of our consulting and law firms to provide a well-rounded firm foundation we can leverage in the most effective ways for our client’s success.

Do you have a book/podcast/talk that’s had a deep impact on your thinking? Can you share a story with us?

I am a huge fan of PSI seminars and highly recommend their courses and podcasts. Their basic seminar offers 34 tools over 30 hours in three days. I was enlightened in multiple ways by gaining awareness into my own beliefs, perspectives, and attitudes and then choosing the best paths forward, leaving old programming that isn’t serving me behind.

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I would inspire a movement of acceptance, love, and support for people with special needs. As a mom of a daughter with cerebral palsy and brain damage, I see a culture that oftentimes is afraid of people with these types of challenges and shuns them. I think that is largely due to a lack of knowledge or understanding and a feeling of inability to relate. It is said that many people with special needs never even leave their own homes. I would enlighten the world about the glorious gifts these people, in particular, have to offer.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

Often, the only thing we can control in our life is our attitude. A garage attendant in an office building said that to me about 15 years ago as I was leaving a very emotional and difficult shareholders meeting of a company in turmoil. He asked me how my day was, and I told him I had just left a very difficult meeting and wasn’t feeling well due to a recent car accident. It really opened my eyes to the fact that so many things happen in our lives that we have little to no control over; however, we have total control over how we think about and respond to those situations.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

A still from Werner Herzog's 'Family Romance Llc'
Community//

In ‘Family Romance Llc’ Werner Herzog tackles our collective and “monumental amount of existential solitude”

by E. Nina Rothe
Biztuition and The Infobesity Epidemic with Julie Christopher #LivingFearlessly on #ThriveGlobal
Community//

Biztuition and The Infobesity Epidemic with Julie Christopher

by Lisa McDonald
Community//

“Focus on the end-result.” with Gregory Sichenzia and Len Giancola

by Len Giancola

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.