How Gina Nuccio, Brenda Fisher, Jacqueline Reynolds & Vanessa Gilbert of RSA Entertainment: “Business is smoke and mirrors and to just relax”

Jackie: We are a diverse society and as creators of content, we owe it to our audiences (and to ourselves), to tell truthful, authentic stories. This is impossible to do without representation of the beautiful diversity that exists. By doing so we impact humanity, we move hearts and we inspire generations toward love, beyond just […]

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Jackie: We are a diverse society and as creators of content, we owe it to our audiences (and to ourselves), to tell truthful, authentic stories. This is impossible to do without representation of the beautiful diversity that exists. By doing so we impact humanity, we move hearts and we inspire generations toward love, beyond just tolerance. We have the power, through thoughtful storytelling, to mold ideas and, with this, comes a tremendous responsibility to demonstrate diversity.

Brenda: I think diversity is important because we are all a mix of cultures. I think we can learn so much from each other about how to be accepting and inclusive. The more we know about people, the better we can understand each other. I think having a true representation of people and not playing to the stereotype is important. Kids are always searching for someone to look up to and the entertainment industry is usually the first place they look. Tv, Social Media, the internet, they all have an influence. Kids are looking for someone like them, that they can relate with, emulate and project into their lives.


As a part of my series about leaders helping to make the entertainment industry more diverse and representative, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing RSA Entertainment.

In 2010, Founder and Co-CEOs Gina Nuccio & Brenda Fisher established RSA as an umbrella organization that manages talent in all aspects of entertainment. RSA Talent Management has grown to include; Chief Digital Talent Advisor Jacqueline Reynolds, and veteran and head of their voiceover department Vanessa Gilbert, to round out a diverse team of powerful women.

Through the years, RSA has become a recognizable and respectful name to casting and amongst the television and film industry. Gina has built relationships with the industry leaders in casting, including network casting VP’s. She’s proud to share that RSA clients can be seen on ABC, NBC, CBS, FOX, AMAZON, NETFLIX, HULU, PRIME, Nickelodeon, Disney as well as Major Feature Films, and National Commercials, the company also represents a number of literary, production and other creatives in entertainment.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to get to know you a bit better. Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

Jackie: I grew up in a truly diverse, multicultural household with my father being Jewish and my mom being Puerto Rican, along with a family of extended relatives that genuinely celebrated and shared cultural traditions. My dad ended up being a wonderful salsa dancer and mami made THE BEST matzo ball soup! This affected me in so many ways, broadening my world with endless gifts of openness, language, understanding and empathy. I’ve been blessed as a child in so many ways and I have my beautiful parents to thank for it.

Brenda: I grew up on the Yakama Nation Reservation and graduated from Wapato High School. I was Vice President of “The Indian Club” which is what it was called back in my day. I rode horses as a kid and my Dad was a true cowboy. My Mom’s side of the family are all of Yakama and Cree descent. I obviously look like my Dad and to this day get the side-eye when I say I am Native American. My brother and I are full blood relatives and he looks Native and I glow in the dark….it is so funny how our genes end up working out. The funny thing is that my son looks exactly like me and he is Native American on his Dad’s side as well and is an enrolled member of the Siletz Tribe of Oregon.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

Vanessa: Honestly, I didn’t want to work anywhere near show business… I grew up with showgirls and wild characters all around and the thought of working in SHOW business was scary. I was really lucky to fall into the voiceover world in 1977 at Abrams Rubaloff with Don Pitts.

He REALLY needed a secretary that knew her stuff… He was very hands-off… so I got to learn in real-time.. sort of a ‘baptism by fire’. I am so grateful that I took to voiceover and have sustained my career for so long.

Brenda: My son motivated me to take on this role. He was interested in training to become an actor and we came out to LA for a summer, so that he could see if he liked it. We are still here and that was 8 years ago. I decided when I became a Mom that his life and his dreams would always come first. I feel like everything has happened the way it is supposed to and I love what I do. Once again, the kid has helped make my life better than I could have imagined. I put my kid first and thrived because of that, now I can help others as well.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

Brenda: I am obsessed with true crime tv, podcasts, and stories…..Forensic Files is my all-time favorite show. I am now representing a client that I first saw on Forensic Files….I thought that was kind of interesting for sure. He wasn’t an actor on Forensic Files he was actually someone testifying at a trial, a witness for the prosecution. I am his sidekick on his new podcast Moving Past Murder.

Gina: Grateful for all the new relationships made throughout the years. Watching actors grow… Especially those we represent as children and crossing over to adulthood. I think making sure you’re surrounded with a wonderful team and roster. There isn’t really any 1 story except the experience in itself. Seeing clients book that BIG ROLE… or just A JOB is rewarding enough.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way.Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

Vanessa: I thank Don Pitts, Debbie Cope, Bob Lloyd THE VOICECASTER, Michael & Donleen Stull and Steve Tisherman. These folks have been so generous with their time and energy and knowledge. They all have GIANT SHOES in the vo business.

Brenda: My Mom always taught us to have a strong work ethic. I sometimes think she may have overshot her education when I find that I can’t go through a day without checking emails and writing down notes for an idea. Pre-COVID-19, I would answer emails, texts and calls standing in line at Disneyland. It is hard to take a true day off. I know this isn’t something that is unique, all of the managers and agents I talk to are in the exact same boat. We don’t want to miss anything!

You have all been blessed with great success in a career path that can be challenging. Do you have any words of advice for others who may want to embark on this career path, but seem daunted by the prospect of failure?

Vanessa: The VO business has done a lot of shifting over the years. 98% of the work was union.. Now it seems union work is hanging on by a thread. If you want to be an agent, you need to INTERN with a busy company.. LISTEN to LOTS of vo demos, READ vo books, WATCH tv and listen to the commercials.. LISTEN to the radio commercials.. go on https://www.ispot.tv/browse and listen to the trends… spot the celebrities doing vo. Become indispensable .. take on projects @ the office.. the web site, helping actors with their demo reels, directing actors in the booth.

Jackie: Success in life is never met without struggle in some form and it’s overcoming these challenges that make victory ever so sweet. Big sacrifice yields big rewards. But the biggest lesson I’ve learned is that career success isn’t all that defines us. In fact, there are many other things, like being a decent, good-hearted, kind and generous person- that are far more meaningful. So, when we experience the inevitable career lows, it is essential to be grounded in those things about ourselves that add value and joy to the lives of others.

What drives you to get up everyday and work in TV and Film? What change do you want to see in the industry going forward?

Gina: I like being part of the beginning process in content development. And, helping talent fulfill their dreams.

What change do you want to see in the industry going forward?

Gina: Innovation. Although we appreciate the 80’s. I would like to see more original content and not so many reboots.

Brenda: Seriously, all hail Cobra Kai though…..seeing every OG come back is friggin awesome! Of course, shout out to Griffin Santopietro who plays Anthony Russo too.

You have such impressive work. What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now? Where do you see yourself heading from here?

Brenda: I am really loving our new Podcast, The Badass Babes of Entertainment, BABE. We are focused on things happening in the industry and hope to shine a light on some things that everyone can relate with. We of course are on a mission to recognize trailblazers that have paved the way for women in our industry.

We are very interested in looking at diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture and our youth growing up today?

Jackie: We are a diverse society and as creators of content, we owe it to our audiences (and to ourselves), to tell truthful, authentic stories. This is impossible to do without representation of the beautiful diversity that exists. By doing so we impact humanity, we move hearts and we inspire generations toward love, beyond just tolerance. We have the power, through thoughtful storytelling, to mold ideas and, with this, comes a tremendous responsibility to demonstrate diversity.

Brenda: I think diversity is important because we are all a mix of cultures. I think we can learn so much from each other about how to be accepting and inclusive. The more we know about people, the better we can understand each other. I think having a true representation of people and not playing to the stereotype is important. Kids are always searching for someone to look up to and the entertainment industry is usually the first place they look. Tv, Social Media, the internet, they all have an influence. Kids are looking for someone like them, that they can relate with, emulate and project into their lives.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

Vanessa: I was really lucky, in the right place at the right time, with a desire to LEARN about the craft. And I know I’m biased here … Voiceover actors are soooo much easier to communicate/hang with than on-camera actors.. they read a lot, cause they have to!! Maybe I wish someone would have told me you do need to have brains.. but a lot of the business is smoke and mirrors and to just relax.. it all falls into place.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

Vanessa: My big thing is ANSWER THE PHONE

Jackie: “Integrity first.” This is my lens for everything.

Brenda: “Gossip is the devil’s Telephone, it’s best just to hang up” Moira Rose “Schitt’s Creek” or “If you don’t have anything nice to say, come sit by me”! Weezer, Shirley MacLaine. I realize these are completely opposite messages but it depends on the day sometimes, lol

You are each people of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be?

Jackie: Love. It’s that simple. Just love. If you can fill your heart with this — in every situation- business included — you can move mountains.

Brenda: Treat others the way you want to be treated and let go of hate and negativity, there is no room for it in our lives. Actions are everything, we all need to be a positive force and we can. Stop the hate and the hurt…..reach out and lift someone up.

Is there a person in the world whom you would love to have lunch with, and why? Maybe we can tag them and see what happens!

Jackie: Carol Burnett. She influenced me in endless ways. Brilliant comedy genius. The first thing I’d say to her (after I’d pick myself up from the floor) is “thanks for the laughs & the inspiration!!”

Brenda: Adam Beach, he is Native American and he played “Victor” in “Smoke Signals”….my entire family quoted from that movie for so long after. I think for about a month after watching this movie, everyone in our family was named Victor, as that is how we addressed each other “Hey Victor”….we could relate to so much of that movie, growing up on the reservation. The new way to bug someone was to say “Hey Victor” a million times…..he would be fun to talk to and of course he has had an outstanding career so far. It would be great to swap reservation stories.

Are you on social media? How can our readers follow you online?

IG @[email protected] @rsaentertainment Facebook @brendahovisfisher Twitter @brendahovisfisher @BABE_PODCAST @rsa_talent @babesofentertainment @rsaentertainment

This was so informative, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!


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