Community//

How Do I Get Through a Crisis?

It’s not fear that kills, but the anticipation of it. It’s not hope that helps survive, but the conviction in it.

The coronavirus pandemic is an event that will influence our behaviors for years and decades to come by. It’s fair to say that our times could be seen as pre-coronavirus and post-coronavirus. We are in the midst of reinventing our relationships, habits, ways we work and interact, prioritize our needs, ambitions, and how we socialize. And, as we embark on a new way of living, it becomes important that we understand how to survive uncertain times. And, better yet, thrive past these uncertainties. 

In order to do that, what’s vital is an understanding of current times with a contextual view of our fears and what’s most important to us at any given point of time. The new normal, as most are calling it will be different, will need us to accustom to it, and to uphold its values. We are already seeing where survival has taken precedence over luxuries, more time with family and healthier relationships are altering the definition of personal freedom and “me” time and remote work flexibility is showing an uptick in productivity than warming a chair in office locations. 

There is a toll uncertainty demands, in the form of physical and mental stress. That’s a given. But, when you recognize it and come to terms with it, you can control it and come out more resilient and strong. 

Our world is changing dramatically as we speak, geo-politically, economically and otherwise. At the same time, there is a growing appreciation of life, relationships, the ability to work and make a living, respect for sciences and social connectivity, appreciation of the capabilities to socialize and exchange information, love and much more. 

Now, it’s about our ability to cope with the current happenings, rebound with a vengeance to make the most of our lives, our time on this planet. There is a new reality. Yes, but why not get busy putting our mark on it than to accept status quo!

For starters, don’t let a crisis cripple your resilience

Take stock of your current situation in contrast to current happenings. Recognize areas where you are strong and where you are weak as well. There is no time to worry or find excuses for your weak areas, be it skills, finance, savings, etc. Acknowledge the facts so you can spend your energy on constructive activities such as tackling how to get in control of your weak areas. Increase the adoption of productivity tools and measures so you can be more agile in your future approach.

Next, as you acknowledge the current situation, put your crisis management thinking forward

Identify what you need to have in hand and in your control to ensure continuity for yourself, your dependents, and your life as close to normalcy as it can be. Coordinate activities to make this possible for the near term and as far ahead as possible.

We are all dependent on the flow of income and that should be the focus. Perhaps, this is the time to ensure you have savings in the form of a nest egg you can rely on. But, it’s still important to ensure continuity of income so you do not want to tap into those savings yet. Budget your day to day life and monitor adherence closely. Be transparent with your family on needs and wants and what takes precedence over what during current times.

Be proactive with taking stock of your skill set

Now is an opportune time to review your skill set and what would be in demand in the new normal. Seek out sources you can tap into to gain new skills and also, exploit your current skill set to your advantage. Invest your resources and time in knowledge management and application so you benefit from them in the near to long term. This will improve your personal and professional resilience and allow for future sustenance and growth.

Reach out to your clients, friends and network

With anxiety running high across the board, it’s a great time to revitalize your connections. Reach out to show care and offer a helping hand where you can. It’s not about what you need but what you can offer others, no matter how little. There is no telling what connections help revitalize your own life at what point of time. Hence, give of yourself willingly and selflessly. Alleviate anxiety in those you come in contact with, communicate actively, frequently and positively. Show empathy and gratitude for the relationships you have. 

Beware of vulnerabilities and the ability of others to prey on them

Remind yourself and your family of this. Its in times like this that predators are out to prey on the weak and benefit. Being aware of your surroundings and alert to such practices will help you catch them before they do any damage. Any contributions you want to make to alleviate current crisis situations for anyone, make it a habit to check thoroughly before you part with your money, effort or other resources. Expect no less from others as well.

Review your assets, liabilities and a go-forward strategy

Take stock of your financial and social responsibilities. Make arrangements to safeguard your and your family’s interests no matter what. Review and revise plans frequently to keep up with the change in social-economic factors. Be comprehensive in your approach and ensure continuity of normal lives as far as possible.

Prioritize Positive thinking and encourage others to be positive

Hold family relationships the highest and encourage the same of others you interact with. In times of uncertainty, it’s far more important to do this in order to keep everyone on the same plane, being positive and knowing that there are others around to rely on in case of need. The human element in our lives and business is central to all that we do. And, should be treated as such at all times.

Consider the needs of your business and staff

Your work family is as important. Look into their needs in times of crisis and support them with as much normalcy as you can give them. Go above and beyond to support their financial and emotional needs in times of a crisis. Where you cannot continue financial support, make resources for easy transition available to them. 

Your business or profession will need more of you at times like this. Though tough, focus on work as well so that you can move away from spending too much time worrying about the crisis as it will hinder your productivity and agitate you. Being focused on your work will enable you to help those in need and also, bring out the positivity you need to manage the other areas in your life.

Finally, remain humble, pragmatic, and flexible. Be ready to change course as situations demand. But before that, make sure you have your alternate plans in place to act upon. Be open to listen, absorb, and respond to current realities. Be proactive and make tough choices when and where you need to. Be aware of the risks as they emerge, monitor the situation, and know that you will get through this crisis too. 

It’s not fear that kills, but the anticipation of it. 

It’s not hope that helps survive, but the conviction in it.

NOTE – For insightful and actionable content, check out Plan B Success podcast on your fav listening platform or subscribe @ www.planb.live

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