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Here’s Why Change is Good for Your Mental Health

For many people, change is good. It splits up your routine, gives you new things to try, and helps you appreciate life from a different perspective.  But for a lot of people, change is scary. It represents the unknown and everything that can go wrong, and it operates out of fear. When you imagine change […]

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For many people, change is good. It splits up your routine, gives you new things to try, and helps you appreciate life from a different perspective. 

But for a lot of people, change is scary. It represents the unknown and everything that can go wrong, and it operates out of fear. When you imagine change this way, it’s difficult to see it as a positive thing that could improve your life and make you happier.

When the COVID-19 pandemic hit, people went into hysteria and didn’t know how to act. The news quickly filled with stories about hoarding toilet paper and sanitary supplies in preparation for the apocalypse. But if they understood the change taking place, learned to embrace it, and took accountability for their part, they wouldn’t have to act in such ways. 

Understanding why change is good for you can improve your mental health and lower your anxiety and stress levels. It’s crucial to adapt to change so you’re prepared for what’s ahead and can deal with it appropriately. 

If you still need convincing, let’s look at a few reasons why change is good for you.

Break the Monotony 

When every day starts to look and feel the same, it’s time for change to take place. People stay stuck in ruts because they’re comfortable where they’re at, even if they’re not happy. Because they’re familiar with their current situation, they don’t feel the need to make changes or put themselves in a new environment.

But it’s crucial to break the cycle of monotonous living and start feeling excited every morning. You should wake up feeling eager to tackle your to-do list, make strides at work, and tend to your interests.

To break the monotony, you first need to set goals and work each day to achieve them little by little. The more you narrow them down, the better. Try to be specific and include a timeline so you can monitor your progress and make sure to stay on track. 

Appreciate the Present

If you’re constantly worrying about the future, you’re not the only one. It’s easy for the mind to get stuck on an idea and run with it. What’s important is that you don’t let the past or the future stop you from living in and enjoying the present.

You don’t know what’s going to happen in the future. As soon as tomorrow, everything could change. At first, few thought the coronavirus pandemic was anything to be afraid of, but now the world is on lockdown. This global upheaval has shown people a lot about themselves, including how they embrace or reject change.

Instead of focusing on tomorrow or yesterday, learn how to appreciate today for what it is. Maybe you didn’t achieve your goals or cross off everything on your to-do list, but that doesn’t mean you failed. Things happen unexpectedly and that’s normal. When you learn to accept that things can change at any time, you’ll feel more at ease when they do. 

Meet New People 

Sometimes, it’s difficult to meet new people, especially if you don’t embrace change and stay stuck in your ways. It’s important to open yourself up to new people and experiences because that’s what makes life interesting. And when you form deep connections with others, it becomes more meaningful.

Change forces you to interact with new people and learn from different points of view. Celebrating diversity is essential to be a well-rounded, open-minded person. No one wants to be around someone who’s close-minded, judgmental, and negative. 

Though the current state of the world makes it difficult to meet people organically, that doesn’t mean you can’t connect with them. Whether you start a blog or attend in-person events, open yourself up to getting to know others. While the pandemic is still going on, you can register for events that are exclusively online to limit physical contact and stay healthy. 

Discover Your Priorities

People in the western world are used to working quickly, being in a rush, and multitasking. Few westerners have adopted the approach of a calm lifestyle where they work at their own pace and discover what’s meaningful to them.

But switching up your environment forces you to work around existing issues and find solutions despite the obstacles. Consider your hobbies and things you enjoy doing outside of your usual routine. If you’re stuck in a rut, then it’s likely your interests and passions have been put on the backburner.

It’s crucial to take the time to figure out what’s meaningful to you. If you resist change so much, then there’s a reason why. You might be afraid of getting out of your comfort zone and having the courage to try new things. Or you’re afraid to fail if you go after what you want. But the important thing is to enjoy your hobbies without setting expectations and simply enjoying the process. At some point, you may even monetize your hobby to create extra income.

Your Turn

When it comes to change, it’s healthy to learn how to embrace it and accept it as a part of life. Letting go of control and trying new things improves your mental health and gives you new things to look forward to. That way, you live an exciting life that you look forward to living.

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