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Heavy Metal Stars Fate DeStroyed: “The war between spirituality and profit has yielded a rather distorted view of the true nature of the universe and our purpose in interacting with one another”

I think that the war between spirituality and profit has yielded a rather distorted view of the true nature of the universe and our purpose in interacting with one another. At the same time, in my experience — I have also noticed a corrupted version of the truth designed to ensnare the desperate and uninitiated, who are […]


I think that the war between spirituality and profit has yielded a rather distorted view of the true nature of the universe and our purpose in interacting with one another. At the same time, in my experience — I have also noticed a corrupted version of the truth designed to ensnare the desperate and uninitiated, who are searching for answers but find themselves trapped in a prison with no perceivable entrance or exit because it is self-made. Most movements that are started and promoted these days seem to be more divisive than unifying. I think there are currently too many movements that involve large groups of “like minded individuals” uniting for a cause. But what exactly is the cause of the like mindedness? Was it conditioned? I am not much for starting movements but if I did it would be one centrally focused on self-exploration and self-realization. A movement that begins within. I have been blessed with a lot of success and that success is thanks to the efforts and good intentions of the people around me. I find that the most successful people surround themselves with people who actually want them to succeed, and by paying that forward and perpetuating that culture, you can really make a difference.


I had the pleasure to interview Franccesca De Struct and the members of Fate DeStroyed. Fate DeStroyed officially arrived at the Los Angeles music scene in 2018 and have been building up their online presence. Formed and fronted by fire-breathing, inked up, bass playing, insanely talented female singer/songwriter Franccesca De Struct; Fate DeStroyed is an “audio assault combining raw emotion, visceral guitars and driving synths to leverage the gap between the hard-hitting 90’s industrial and modern heavy metal”. Musical talent, brains and a hardcore work ethic, combined with her unique ability to manipulate her voice between singing and screaming within a single word of death-tone cliffhangers and raging excitement for their next soon-to-come release.Franccesca attributes the success of her passion project turned rising star to her elite line-up of seasoned musicians with unique foundational talents from businessman to a promoter to sound tech guru, along with a solid comprehension of social media engagement trends. The newest Fate DeStroyed single, Art of Betrayal is available now with more singles coming soon on a regular basis. Download AOB on Spotify here:


Thank you so much for joining us Franccesca! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

Music has always been an integral part of my life. From learning to play trumpet, French horn, and bassoon in middle/high school, to picking up my bass guitar at 14 — I can’t remember a time in which music wasn’t a part of my daily life. I have always believed that life is too precious to spend it doing something that doesn’t fulfill you. Music has always been that penultimate fulfillment for me.

I remember watching a music video for A Perfect Circle’s “Judith” when I was 14. I saw a woman playing a bass and, in that instant, I knew that I wanted to have that; to be that. I got my first bass and started learning how to play. I joined local garage bands and never really let it go. Through the years I have spent most of my time playing bass in bands.

At 22, I decided to relocate to Los Angeles in order to accomplish my goals of being a full time, professional musician. The hunger to succeed consumed me. I auditioned, and filled in, and played and networked as much as I could until I was able to accomplish years of touring and band experience. I loved it. I sacrificed the comfort of high paying corporate jobs in order to do what I loved and I am so glad that I did. As my musical career continued to grow, and I continued to learn new skills, I decided that I wanted to try my hand at being a front woman. I pooled every resource I had and poured myself into writing music for myself and finding people to be a part of my vision. So far it has worked out wonderfully.

-Franccesca De Struct, Front Woman

Can you share the most interesting story that occurred to you in the course of your music career?

Playing direct support for Steel Panther at the Key Club with one of my former bands Gun Metal Groove was particularly memorable because we had our good friend Mike Starr (original bass player of Alice In Chains) get up and play “Man in the Box” from AIC with us. He jumped up on stage with us as planned as I handed him my bass as I switched over to the second mic to join our vocalist on the song. It was epic especially since I grew up listening to Alice In Chains long before we became friends with Mike.

The funny thing is this all went down while Steel Panther was in their backstage dressing rooms not seeing our set. When Steel Panther took the stage after we played they heard Mile Starr was at the show and called him up to play a song with them as well which ended up being none other than “Man in the Box”….again…after we already played it with him just about 30 minutes before. Mike even gave us a laugh and a shrug while he took the stage with them. The audience just had the same type of “WTF?/ deja vu” reaction. We all just thought it was hilarious.

Those were unforgettable great times with Mike on and off stage that night that will forever be dear to my heart. That performance on stage with us would end up being Mike Starr’s last performance ever as he passed away just about a month later. R.I.P. brother.

-Nathan Youngblood, Bass

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

Aside from continuously working on new tunes for FATE DESTROYED, I have branched out and started teaching myself graphic design and video production/editing. It’s all definitely in the “hobby” stage as of now but it’s nice to adventure into these new fields. More ways for me to create and artistically express myself make me happy!

-Jonni Law, Guitar

Who are some of the most interesting people you have interacted with? What was that like? Do you have any stories?

Out of all the people I’ve worked with, I think the new and upcoming local bands I work with are the most interesting, especially seeing where they start out and end up.

But here are some that you may have already heard of that have been just some of the most “interesting” people I’ve interacted with…

the late and great Kim Fowley (Producer of The Runaways) & Mike Starr of Alice in Chains (R.I.P. to you both

Also…Bill Manspeaker and the 700 something fellow band members worldwide in my other band Green Jelly.

Not to mention I had amazing times working with Marilyn Manson, Avenged Sevenfold, Incubus, In This Moment, Butcher Babies, Steel Panther, Insane Clown Posse, Tommy Vext (Bad Wolves), Jared Gomes (M.C.U.D. of Hed P.E.), Michael Black (Taipan/Dead Sea Records), Ryan Beuter (The Killer Dueling Pianos), Otep, Crazy Town, P.O.D., Korn, Escape the Fate, Motorgrater, Carlton Bost (Orgy), Ty Fury (Trapt), Halestorm, The Mendenhall Experiment, and my former bands Dirty Machine, Defunct, Substance A, Fliplid, The Genseng, The Fabulous Miss Wendy, & Gun Metal Groove.

And I can’t forget the most interesting people I work with at present time is my band Fate DeStroyed!

– Nathan Youngblood, Bass

Which people in history inspire you the most? Why?

Julius Caesar: It’s hard to not marvel at this guy’s life and accomplishments. Politically adept and revered as one of the greatest military minds in history, his influence is still felt even to this day. He inspires me to be strong, motivated, and to persevere even through times of doubt and failure. He is proof that you can be accomplished, successful, and even change the world despite life throwing you endless hurdles and obstacles. Many of life’s tests can seem inexorable and to me, Caesar symbolizes overcoming them.

Ludwig van Beethoven: He easily the most recognized and influential musician of the 19th century and considered one of the greatest composers of all time. His influence is easily heard throughout modern music, especially in the metal genres. I mean come on, would metal and shred even EXIST today as we know it if not for the genius of Beethoven!? I owe a lot of what I’m doing musically to this guy.

-Jonni Law, Guitar

How have you used your success to bring goodness to the world?

I am just a person in the world pursuing my dreams the best I can. If other people see that and it encourages them to pursue their dreams, then that’s success to me.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I think that the war between spirituality and profit has yielded a rather distorted view of the true nature of the universe and our purpose in interacting with one another. At the same time, in my experience — I have also noticed a corrupted version of the truth designed to ensnare the desperate and uninitiated, who are searching for answers but find themselves trapped in a prison with no perceivable entrance or exit because it is self-made. Most movements that are started and promoted these days seem to be more divisive than unifying. I think there are currently too many movements that involve large groups of “like minded individuals” uniting for a cause. But what exactly is the cause of the like mindedness? Was it conditioned? I am not much for starting movements but if I did it would be one centrally focused on self-exploration and self-realization. A movement that begins within. I have been blessed with a lot of success and that success is thanks to the efforts and good intentions of the people around me. I find that the most successful people surround themselves with people who actually want them to succeed, and by paying that forward and perpetuating that culture, you can really make a difference.

-Ben Levi, Drums

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

As you encounter the bs, don’t lose sight of why you play music in the 1st place…whether it be for the love of music and the feeling you get while playing like it is for me, or if it’s something else…remind yourself every day.

…Oh, and work hard, it pays off!

-Nathan Youngblood, Bass

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Sometimes when people criticize you, they are just trying to sell you something. I used to be very sensitive to criticism. It’s difficult to not take negative feedback personally — especially when it deals with your passion. When I first started, I didn’t even consider people’s intentions when they offered criticism. If someone told me a mix was bad… I didn’t stop to think that they could be saying that just to try and sell me their own mixing service. There were times in my early career that I fell into that trap and spent money and time and energy needlessly to fix a nonexistent problem. Don’t make my same mistakes. Take advice with a grain of salt and be aware of people’s intentions!
  2. Make your passion a job (and treat it with the same urgency and dedication) When you’re first starting out, especially on a path to pursue a passion that mainstream society may call a “waste of time”, it can be extremely difficult to allow yourself to invest the amount of time needed to make it happen. I remember when I first started pursuing music, my considerations always heavily favored my 9–5. I would get off work and be exhausted and make excuses to myself as to why it was okay, I didn’t do anything to achieve my other goals that day. I was making some progress then; but not at the rate at which I wanted. One day I woke up and decided deep down that music was the only real choice for me, and that the only way I could be successful was to treat the time I spent pursuing as though it had equal importance to the time I spent doing the job that paid my bills. Think about it — every day you go to work and do your job for 8+ hours a day because you know you HAVE to… and when you treat your passion with the same feeling, you will see the results you want.
  3. You really are the company you keep — associate with professionals to get a professional result. When I first started pursuing music, I found myself dedicating my time to anyone who just SAID that they wanted the same things; when in reality they weren’t as serious or dedicated as I was. I remember I once hired this guitar player because he had the look I wanted and said all the right things about wanting to be a part of my project. He would show up to rehearsal and be on his phone or show up not knowing parts. He was hardly available to write, and when put to the test, he was unable to produce the results he claimed that he could. It was only when I surrounded myself with people who proved their professionalism that the band started to gain some traction. It was a lot of months wasted, and I wish someone would have reminded me that the difference between success and attempt is the dedication to make it happen.
  4. Do your job FIRST — Celebrate after. I remember in one of my previous bands, I had a particular night early in the tour where the fans were celebrating with us before the show. Fan after fan come up to us, handing us shots and beer and together we all drank and talked and laughed. Finally, the time came when I had to step on stage and do my job… problem was that I was 2 shots in too deep to play. I slopped my way through the set, very anxious and uncomfortable knowing I was making so many mistakes. I was humiliated, and of course my band mates weren’t very thrilled either. It was then that I had to remember that what I am doing is a JOB, and other people depend on me to do it to the best of my abilities. That meant that celebrating can only come after I handle my business.
  5. The cheap route is almost never the right one. When you’re not independently wealthy, it can be difficult to allow yourself to invest properly in your dreams. Cutting corners sometimes seems like the responsible thing to do. We all have lives, jobs, responsibilities, and often the route which takes the least of our resources seems like the best one. It isn’t. I remember in the early years; I would hold back from buying the better-quality equipment or find the most low budged photographers around. I dealt with the failure of so much equipment, and software, and the various other areas in which I cheaped out that in the end I paid way more than I would have had I just made the right initial investment.

-Franccesca De Struct, Front Woman

We are blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she just might see this, especially if we tag them 🙂

Maynard James Keenan — the singer from tool. I know it may seem somewhat contrived and naïve to choose a singer, but if I could have breakfast with anyone, he would be it. As artists, it can be extremely difficult not to waver in artistic integrity in order to meet the status quo and adhere to the whims of the consumer in order to be successful. Maynard represents to me an artist who lived and breathed his art and compromised for no one. He didn’t follow trends; he created an entirely new type of music that was readily consumed by millions of people. I want insight into that strength and determination. I want to know how to be unapologetically who I am and create the art I feel and be successful in doing so.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Follow Fate DeStroyed:

https://www.facebook.com/FateDeStroyed/

https://www.instagram.com/fate_destroyedband/

www.fatedestroyed.com

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