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Healing after the Pain; Eghe Nimose bears it all on “Tabitha”

The Nigerian Rumba musician revealed why it took him three (3) years to finally accept the loss of a childhood friend and the painstaking recovery process.

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Eghe Nimose - Tabitha
Eghe Nimose - Tabitha

Through my experiences as a progressive author and correspondent to several entities, I have met people with stories that triggered laughter, empathy and even excitement. But none as such that brought me into deep sober reflection on the value of acceptance of pain instead of denial (so healing can begin), like as told by Eghe Nimose, a Nigerian musician in Benin City.

Yearly, scores of hopeful Africans lost their lives while trying to cross to Europe and other continents for greener pasture. The COVID-19 traveling barrier is the only reason we haven’t heard any of such recently.

Eghe Nimose grew up with Timothy Aliu Uyi, a childhood friend and they spent their teenage days together – living in same single room and sharing basic amenities. More than sharing rooms, they shared passions, dreams, ambitions and even challenging moments. Life finally sent them to different spheres with Eghe Nimose becoming an ICT expert (before venturing into music recently in March 2020) managing a young software firm today – EntriFlex Technologies, but Timothy tried his hands on electrical jobs and photography before deciding to travel overseas for greener pasture.

He joined some group of locals with same ambition and they went through several borders up to Libya where they pitched and planned the journey of no return via the Red Sea to Spain.

BBC reported thousands of lives lost during these adventures and how various NGO’s are coming onboard to help savage the situation and provide first-hand relief to affected survivals. Unfortunately, Eghe Nimose learnt from just one of the survivals (who inform them at home) that Timothy his beloved friend didn’t make it out of the ship wreck.

“After three years since 2017. Daily, I await his call hoping soon he’s going to call me and say “Hey bro, sorry I haven’t reached you since…”, or probably send me a facebook request or inbox message. But of recent, I had to let go and finally accept that he is gone. And then, a wind of pain rushed in like the unfortunate event just happened today. I started grieving and it dawned on me that I have been holding on to this for a long time with a denial perspective. I realized denial of pain or unfortunate event is even more hurtful because we prolong and postpone our pains and healing process”, Eghe Nimose said.

Well, as a musician, luckily he has an outlet of voicing out his hurts and feelings and he told this story in a song he titled “Tabitha”, sang in his native dialect “Bini Language” of Benin City, Edo State – Nigeria.

Here is the music video for “Tabitha” by Eghe Nimose:

Although governments of various nations and several agencies have policies and programs in place to discourage youths from embarking on such journeys. From skill acquisition to empowerment and others. But these have played little or no significant in such desisting efforts.

I strongly believe addressing little domestic issues like provision of basic infrastructures as electricity, good roads and a good taxing policy and programs for startups and SME (which the Nigerian government has implemented recently), will help giving hope to dreams.

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