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Gratitude, a valuable habit

It is scientifically proven that writing thank you lists, with some frequency, increases your level of happiness. It consists of writing at least three things that you appreciate from the heart, situations that have made your day, challenges that you have achieved, aspects of your life that you value. Some people do well to do […]

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It is scientifically proven that writing thank you lists, with some frequency, increases your level of happiness. It consists of writing at least three things that you appreciate from the heart, situations that have made your day, challenges that you have achieved, aspects of your life that you value.

Some people do well to do it once a week (for example, on Sunday afternoons, which is the time of the week when people tend to feel the most anxiety and sadness); other people find it much more rewarding to do it on a daily basis. Each person must find their balance in the job of dishwasher repair, according to their circumstances. They do not have to be great events or mythical moments in your life (birth of a child, buy your first house, finish your degree, or overcome the coronavirus being over 65 years old), they can also be small things (lie in a bed with clean sheets, having slept through, enjoying an unexpected phone call, laughing with a stranger, cooking something tasty, having time to do your favorite sport, giving a hug to a loved one or seeing the full moon).

Sharing you thank you list with a friend; your partner, your psychologist, or your family is very enriching. It is a very fun tool to put into practice during dinner, with a coffee, or simply as the main subject of an e-mail or WhatsApp. The person who listens or reads it will easily feel infected by your positive state of mind and will be more likely to be encouraged to share with you other aspects for which they feel grateful or grateful.

Sometimes we are not fully aware of how contagious emotions are. If after the question “how are you?” , your partner answers something negative, with a serious or bitter face and takes pleasure in complaining and victimhood, it is unlikely that you will add something positive or good that has happened to you, with a smile from ear to ear. Take this into account before answering the question “How are you?” and look for something to be thankful for, something positive to share; Surely you will find it and your interlocutor will thank you and will follow the same emotional line.

An exercise of great value, not only for those who write it but for those who receive it or listen to it, is to write a thank you letter to the person who has helped you in life. If you take your time, be it an afternoon or several days to write what you feel and it takes shape, you will discover that you are much more grateful than you imagine. It is important to read the letter to him in person and then give it to him as a gift so that he can reread it as many times as he wants.

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