Getting Back into the School Year Routine

Especially if you have younger children, your family may need some help getting back to a normal school routine after a long summer. One of the most important ways you can do this is to establish firm rules for going to bed and waking in the morning. Even on weekends, your kids shouldn’t be sleeping […]

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Especially if you have younger children, your family may need some help getting back to a normal school routine after a long summer. One of the most important ways you can do this is to establish firm rules for going to bed and waking in the morning. Even on weekends, your kids shouldn’t be sleeping more than two hours longer than they do on weekdays. Additionally, there are more routines you can set to create a consistent school schedule.

Create a Good Morning Routine

 After setting rigid times for sleep, you should begin creating a morning ritual that will be consistent throughout the school year. This may involve setting multiple alarms for children who find it difficult to awaken in the morning. You should also discuss breakfast options with your children. Offer them healthy meal choices that they like to ensure they start the day off in a healthy way.

Make Some Screen Time Restrictions

 Some children like to spend their time watching television, while other kids rarely take their eyes away from laptops, tablets, or phones. Either situation is unhealthy and can interfere with school performance. You should restrict the use of electronics and television throughout the school year, limiting usage to a couple of hours per day. The only exceptions should be in the use of laptops for doing homework and research for school projects. 

Create Work Areas

 Each child should have their own work area for doing homework. It should be a distraction-free area, and mobile devices should not be allowed in this area. If you have the space, you can use one room and create a classroom-like setting with a desk for each child. If you don’t have the extra room, a dining room or kitchen table can double as a workspace. During homework time, be sure to apply strict rules that will help limit distractions.

 The weekends and holidays your kids spend away from school are just as important. By scheduling special activities, vacations, and events for days off, you can distinguish between those days and school days. The days your kids have off from school should feel like rare treats. In addition to making the distinction between educational responsibilities and leisure time, these occasions can also help you bond more closely with your children.

Article originally published on Dr. Edward Thalheimer’s Blog

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