First Responders First//

Front Line Workers, Do You Have Self-Care Rituals?

In times of crisis, taking care of yourself is crucial.

michaeljung / Shutterstock
michaeljung / Shutterstock

Our healthcare workers on the frontline of this pandemic are facing challenges they didn’t sign up for when they chose to work in the medical arena. They didn’t expect to be putting their own life and the lives of their families in jeopardy. They didn’t expect to be faced with the sense of failure resulting from multiple deaths a shift. 

There are many ways to support our healthcare people and I’m sure when this pandemic is under control support will be offered. BUT self care now is important. What can nurses and doctors do at the end of each shift that can ease the burdens they are carrying? Here are a couple of simple ideas for self care:

  • The need to have a safe person to “download” your feelings and fears with. At the end of the shift talk, share stories, happenings, before you go home or find one person who will be a listener and each day “download” with them. Remember, not just anyone can be a good listener or will have the aptitude to understand. Healthcare workers living in this crisis time, seeing death many times a shift, dealing with their own energy levels in crisis mode have to “get it out” or those experiences will be carried forever.
  • Create a closure ritual for yourself. At the end of the day you want a ritual that releases what has occurred. Whatever happened is not yours to carry.
    • Maybe when you are in the shower, before you get out, in your mind’s eye wash all the day’s energy and happenings down the drain. Imagine the water beginning at your head and taking all of the day with it as it glides over your body and down the drain. See yourself as sparkling as you step out of the shower.
    • Consider creating a simple, special place, for example, with a flower and a candle. As you light the candle bless your day, the good you offered and then blow out the candle as you release the work day.

These are just a couple of ideas. Create your own ritual. How will you let go of the day’s activities so you can start afresh tomorrow?

During this time of crisis work it is hard to remember to take care of yourself. There doesn’t seem time for that but if you don’t at least try to put “your own oxygen mask on” you will not get the essentials you need to continue. You are carrying fear for yourself (whether realized or not), excess adrenaline just to meet the shift needs (which brings a sense of exhaustion when the shift is over), and non stop 8, 10, 12 work hours, so sleep for you is vital. Don’t neglect the basics, food, sleep, and a release of each day.

When this is over we will all have life adjusting to do. For some of us it will be harder than others. Basic self care now is one of the factors that will allow us to continue to care for others in the future.

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