“Find ways to educate” with Brett Joerger

Find ways to educate about the impact of renewable energy and fossil fuels.The saying goes, out of sight, out of mind. Often we’re all so plugged into our devices and everyday life, that we don’t see the implications of climate change. Specifically, how our actions impact the world at large including the future generations to […]

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Find ways to educate about the impact of renewable energy and fossil fuels.

The saying goes, out of sight, out of mind. Often we’re all so plugged into our devices and everyday life, that we don’t see the implications of climate change. Specifically, how our actions impact the world at large including the future generations to come. It’s imperative to share stories of trials and tribulations — whether it’s the Camp Fire caused by PG&E negligence or wildfires in Napa, scorching homes. Discuss how all of these events impact the environment, society and more importantly people — and what kids can do today to mitigate these events.

As part of my series about what we must do to inspire the next generation about sustainability and the environment, I had the pleasure of interviewing Brett Joerger.

With more than 20 years of experience, Brett Joerger is the CEO of Westhaven Power, with proven skills across multiple facets of the trade. He understands team engagement and builds world class teams who are dedicated to excellent customer service. His passion to empower a mission-focused culture and bring #gridliberation to customers is unparalleled.

Thank you so much for doing this with us! Our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit more. Can you tell us a bit about how you grew up?

I grew up in SoCal with my mom, who I have the greatest respect for. So, I’ve always carried that on throughout my career as a reminder to be humble, grateful, honor the people I care about. Also, my grandpa, who, in my eyes was a hero, had lived through World War II as a mechanical engineer. So I observed him assembling the most interesting things as a kid. The amount of ambition and passion he had for his trade was inspiring.

Was there an “aha moment” or a specific trigger that made you decide you wanted to become a scientist or environmental leader? Can you share that story with us?

I had already registered for radiology courses. But my gut was telling me otherwise — I wasn’t excited about the career I was about to embark on. So I asked a friend about the next best tech innovation was, which was HVAC at the time. That day, I admitted myself into a program and began my apprenticeship with master craftsmen and exceptionally skilled second and third generations. I never looked back. Then I began solar installations in Humboldt, near Westhaven, where Westhaven Power was born. I quickly realized my talent for designing and assembling custom systems that powered homes with an abundance of energy and opulence through cleaner energy.

Is there a lesson you can take out of your own story that can exemplify what can inspire a young person to become an environmental leader?

My best piece of advice is to take a step back from all the hype around “prestigious careers”. Money and all the material things are here today, gone tomorrow. Environmental leaders don’t happen overnight. It’s about the journey, and the power to help others discover their best life. When it is fulfilling, you’re on track.

Can you tell our readers about the initiatives that you or your company are taking to address climate change or sustainability? Can you give an example for each?

We are on a mission to accelerate the world’s grid liberation through reliable power abundance one home at time. This is what we call the “Grid Liberation Revolution” — where we work with every customer towards grid liberation. This means that customers will no longer rely on the failing grid for power. Instead, they’ll self-generate electricity output that’s all sunshine. Through, each customer will be able to store and save energy — and a ton of money. Some of our customers already see their utlity bills drop from $400 to $10 a month.

Can you share 3 lifestyle tweaks that the general public can do to be more sustainable or help address the climate change challenge?

  • Every home and business must go solar and battery now
  • Every home must update their heating and cooling systems
  • Every home should trade up their car to electric vehicles

Any one of these will significantly help reduce fossil fuel emissions, particularly carbon, that facilitates global warming.

Ok, thank you for all that. Here is the main question of our interview: The youth led climate strikes of September 2019 showed an impressive degree of activism and initiative by young people on behalf of climate change. This was great, and there is still plenty that needs to be done. In your opinion what are 5 things parents should do to inspire the next generation to become engaged in sustainability and the environmental movement? Please give a story or an example for each.

  • Blue-collar is the new white collar — and in Westhaven’s Case, it’s orange.

Too often, blue-collar work is viewed as a working class person who performs manual labor in factories and plants when in fact it’s the new white collar. Our distinguished teams, specifically highly skilled installers, are have very sophisticated technical knowledge, and are well versed in renewable energy technologies. While the role is hands-on, they are still the mastermind behind the actual installation. With precision and attention to detail, they deliver world-class applications and reliable power to homes, one panel at a time.

  • Find ways to educate about the impact of renewable energy and fossil fuels.

The saying goes, out of sight, out of mind. Often we’re all so plugged into our devices and everyday life, that we don’t see the implications of climate change. Specifically, how our actions impact the world at large including the future generations to come. It’s imperative to share stories of trials and tribulations — whether it’s the Camp Fire caused by PG&E negligence or wildfires in Napa, scorching homes. Discuss how all of these events impact the environment, society and more importantly people — and what kids can do today to mitigate these events.

  • Discuss the importance of environmental responsibility, implications, and how children are the future to shaping the world in which we live.

This is similar to the bullet above. It’s true when people say the children are our future. How we live today, will dictate how we live tomorrow. Teach responsibility and accountable, including appreciation for our surroundings and the ecosystem, in which provides an interdependency of life.

How would you articulate how a business can become more profitable by being more sustainable and more environmentally conscious? Can you share a story or example?

Three words — absolutus, libertos, imperium. In other words, grid liberation achieved through the installation of the right solar and storage for the site. Even a smaller system the size of 3–5kW can have an environmental impact as much as 5 tons of CO2 avoided, 144 trees grown for 10 years, and 510 gallons of gas not used.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

Professionally, all the master craftsmen, who I had the opportunity to learn from. I was on job sites, where it was multi-generational, from the grandpa to the son, and the grandson. I was lucky enough to be a part of that and learned a lot in that kind of high expectation environment.

You are a person of great influence and doing some great things for the world! If you could inspire a movement that would bring the greatest amount of good to the greatest amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Join the grid liberation revolution!

Do you have a favorite life lesson quote? Can you tell us how that was relevant to you in your own life?

The saying goes, “You don’t work for me, you work with me.” This has enabled an ambitious culture of leaders in our own right, to come together and deliver on our mission. This motto makes us a relentless workforce that is committed to our customers’ grid liberation journeys.

What is the best way for people to follow you on social media?

I’m Brett Joerger on LinkedIn or follow the Westhaven Power social channels on Facebook, Instagram and Twitter!

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