Community//

Filmmaker Jonathan Baker: “Everyone, has to work together now, it’s kind of now or never, for the planet; The good news is, it’s going to bring us all together, not divide us”

…I believe the greatest confusion in civilization’s history hinges around our spirituality, and now, the lack of respect for our planet. We’ve always had a lot of faiths at battle, and people tend to be pretty disrespectful to one another about which one is right. The problems with that seem to have intensified in my […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres. We publish pieces written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and though they are reviewed for adherence to our guidelines, they are submitted in their final form to our open platform. Learn more or join us as a community member!

…I believe the greatest confusion in civilization’s history hinges around our spirituality, and now, the lack of respect for our planet. We’ve always had a lot of faiths at battle, and people tend to be pretty disrespectful to one another about which one is right. The problems with that seem to have intensified in my lifetime because we live in a more global village, we communicate at lightning speed compared to when I was growing up. Change is faster than ever; social, economic, but some people are operating in old systems of understanding that won’t evolve with the times. Now, paradoxically, this rate of change is actually really good news. I think we’re living at an incredible time. To see national boundaries falling because of greater communication, economic connectivity, social media? Information sharing and technology is an incredible equalizer and bonds distant people together like nothing we have ever seen. And because of our continued disrespect for mother nature we can no longer ignore the result of over consumerism across developed countries. We need to implement the economic measure where companies that produce goods and services have to also factor in the cost to the environment. The GDP is an outdated concept. There is a next level social contract that needs to extend globally. I believe science is the answer to many of the issues we all face together, despite what faith we subscribe to in our private lives, we have to work together now. You may believe in any god you want, that’s fine, as long as it doesn’t interfere with the fact that we all have to live together on one planet, and that planet is telling us that she’s sick. The truth of the matter is that we live disconnected from our nature; we’ve grown desensitized and selfish for our way of lives, the comforts. Our rich societies are so spoiled. I made a movie in India and it was the greatest experience of my life. Changed my perspective entirely. We want what we want, and we don’t understand the ramifications of the manufacturing system that got us that good in the first place. Plastic is on the top of my hit list. It needs to go — now. We can do it. Renewable energies and their technologies should be seen as an opportunity for new industries to help the old die. They’re obsolete. It’s time for them to go — now. We are such a smart species, we have the means to solve these issues, but we have to stop the vitriolic rhetoric (usually originate from our different backgrounds in faith and education). The insults across party lines ruin our democracy, especially in the past decades. And, if the politicians aren’t going to get along, then we need to vote with our dollars, every day. We must get down to business and remember, the consumer has the greatest power. We exercise it literally — every single economic transition we make. Sacrifices are necessary, sure. What generation hasn’t made sacrifices? My grandfather was in three wars. Three… fighting for freedom and democracy… for our way of life? Everyone, and I mean the world, has to work together now. It’s kind of now or never. For the planet. This is the biggest deal humanity has faced, and the good news is, I believe it’s going to bring us all together. Not divide us. That’s the only way this works out.


As a part of my series about pop culture’s rising stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Jonathan Baker. Jonathan is a member of the Producer’s Guild of America and works with his partner Nnamdi Asomugha under the banner iAm21 Entertainment. They are currently producing an untitled Tessa Thompson jazz era film also starring Eva Longoria. They produced the upcoming feature The Banker, starring Samuel L. Jackson, Anthony Mackie, and Nicolas Hoult, directed by George Nolfi which sold to Apple and will be released in theaters late 2019. They are producing stage productions of Spamalot, the adaptation of the movies August Rush and The Harder They Come. He wrote-directed and stars in the feature film satire Manifest Destiny Down: Spacetime, due out around Halloween 2019. He produced, directed, and composed the score for the short Harper Finch, currently appearing in festivals. He Executive Produced Crown Heights (dir. Matt Ruskin), starring LaKeith Stanfield (Short Term 12, Atlanta) and Nnamdi, which won the Audience Award at Sundance in 2017 and was bought by Amazon Studios. He Co-Produced the feature musical Basmati Blues, starring Donald Sutherland, Tyne Daly, Brie Larson and Scott Bakula; and Executive Produced Halfway, starring Quinton Aaron (The Blindside). Prior to being an independent producer, JB worked at Sony Pictures Entertainment, first in television research, then at Screen Gems and TriStar Pictures as Marketing Manager. He helped release over forty major theatrical films, of which ten achieved #1 at the box-office. Prior to Los Angeles, JB worked on Wall Street at Salomon Brothers Asset Management in Institutional Sales, and on Broadway at The Nederlander Producing Company of America. JB received a Best Actor award for his performance in Thank You for Not Smoking, an official entry in the 1997 Sundance Film Festival. JB is an Adjunct Professor of feature film and entertainment economics at Carnegie Mellon’s Masters of Entertainment Industry Management program in the Heinz School of Public Policy. He also teaches at GIOCA, a graduate program at the University of Bologna, Italy. JB studied Musical Theater at The Boston Conservatory of Music and The University of Michigan School of Music. He studied directing and acting at the University of California, Los Angeles Extension Program under Don Richardson.


Thank you so much for doing this with us Jonathan! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

I’m a military brat, my father was a marine, a jag officer. So I was born in Ocean Side, CA, at Camp Pendleton, before moving to Japan, then back to California, then to South Carolina — five places there — then to Ohio — for my teenage years. It was quite an interesting childhood to say the least. My first memories are from Japan actually.

I have a brother who’s two years older, so we were used to moving from school to school until we settled in Ohio, which was in a small town in the middle of nowhere. Lots of farmland surrounding a nice community, safe. Nothing really to do there except study at school and, for me, do shows. I performed from an early age, got the acting and singing bug, and that was about all I did after school. Go from rehearsal to rehearsal, musical to musical until I was accepted into the University of Michigan school of music, into their Musical Theatre program.

That was the final leg of my journey and a big one. I was quite serious about trying to get on the Broadway stage, until my mother suddenly died of a stroke when I was twenty. I stopped performing, sort of fell into a depression. School was my way out, I dug deep into philosophy, religion and psychology studies. When I graduated, I moved to New York anyway — what else was I going to do? I didn’t quite feel like performing — that felt frivolous — but I had to find a way to support myself. So, I got a job working on Wall Street at a bank doing institutional sales research. Wild right?

I made real money for the first time and decided to spend some of it putting up shows in small black box theaters around New York at night. And that was the beginning of the real world, I would say…

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

When I was a kid, I couldn’t read for a long time. I was bullied in school, ostracized, made to feel stupid. Until my mother got me tested and they determined that I was dyslexic. Apparently, I was smart, or so they said, but my brain worked differently than other kids. My mother was a teacher already and took my dyslexia on as a personal quest — to teach me how to read, and she did, but it took years. To build my confidence in the meantime she noticed I was always tapping my pencil on stuff. She started me taking drum lessons when I was six or seven. That was the beginning of everything. I went from drums, to the trombone, to singing and dancing in show choirs, piano lessons… I even took drawing lessons, and my mother actually taught me photography. She was a pretty talented black and white photographer actually and would shoot everything you can imagine as we traveled for my dad’s work. Little did I know that all of those crafts would somehow marry into what I do today with film. It’s strange how all of it — literally — comes into play pretty much every day now.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

It’s hard to pick one out as the most interesting. Depends on the audience really. I’ve had so many strange and unusual moments for sure. Some that I can even believe are real now after all this time. I’ve worked with so many movie stars, Broadway icons, musicians and one thing I’ve come to appreciate is that everyone puts on their pants one leg at a time. We all have our issues, we all have our insecurities, and problems. That being said, I think one gem is when I was working on the movie Lords of Dogtown. It was a pretty special film to be sure, and I was pretty close with the entire team on that one.

We were at the premiere and I had become the wrangler for Tony Alva and Heath Ledger. Now, these were two of the nicest guys you might ever have the honor of meeting. Truly. We had arrived at the Hollywood club where the after party was and were just kind of huddled up in a little chat. I can’t remember for whatever reason, but it was pretty casual, just taking it all in. And we’re surrounded by a sea of mayhem mind you, just chaos. But in the middle of it all, there we were just the three of us. And then Tony whips out a giant joint and offers it up to us. I thought — now this is just one of those moments that you just can’t turn down. So, the three of just lit it up and had a laugh. I thought… what is happening?

Sadly, that moment would become even more special a few years later when we lost Heath. I was at Sundance at the time with another buddy of mine who was good friends with him. It was a pretty typical Sundance, everyone was having pretty much the time of their lives — until everyone’s phones starter ringing off the hook. I asked Tristan what happened, and he said Heath had just died. We were all in shock. The next thing we knew it’s all over the news. Very surreal stuff. I guess I focus on this story because there is a fun side of what we do in this business and a dangerous side of what can happen if you go down the rabbit hole. It has a way of eating you alive if you’re not careful. I think after all these years, I’ve survived so many mini tragedies, lost friends in 9–11, worked with brilliant people, like Heath and even Philip Seymour Hoffman, but fame is not all its cut out to be you might say. A lot of people actually try to avoid the spot light and prefer that road. I tend to be a pretty private person these days, and like not being in the limelight, which is ironic if you consider what I wanted when I started out as a kid singing and dancing.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Oh, I have a ridiculous story that cost me dearly when I was younger. I was working for a pretty famous guy in New York that was notoriously a total wreck. It was the kind of job that people thought you had survived a long time if you made it past six months. I was there a year and a half. I don’t know if that’s because I was just a glutton for punishment or because I was so determined to get above an assistant level before I moved on, but regardless he was abusive and downright terrible a lot of the time.

Anyway, I was totally burnt out from him and I went out one night to blow off some steam with some friends and had a few too many drinks. I was young, it was New York city, and you know… I came home still pretty lit about the week I had had at work and in my stupor took it upon myself to charge my bosses credit card with a few things over the phone. The next day the night before was a fog and I didn’t even remember doing it until I got to work and his credit card bill came in to the office for me to process. Needless to say, it was a pretty embarrassing development and I was appropriately handled. Ironically enough by one of the other bosses in the company — the one I actually really looked up to and actually respected. It was humiliating to say the least. I of course paid for all the costs and that was that. But let me tell you, the karma one must deal with…

I mean, when I look back, that turn was one domino that took my life in an entirely new direction — one I would have never predicted, and I would say — was unimaginably better than my wildest fantasies after all this time. Was I wrong it doing it? OF COURSE! Totally. What lessons did I learn? Too many to count. Obviously, don’t use your bossed credit card when you’re drunk! But, honestly, I tell my Carnegie Mellon students now, listen. If you’re not being respected by a boss at the office — just leave. Don’t even waste your time. Don’t put yourself in a situation that you might get dumb and retaliate — and cause even more damage to yourself. I think young people, or people in general do something Buddhism calls stacking dukkha on top of dukkha. We tend to create more suffering on top of suffering. It’s bad enough when you’re being dumped on every day, but we have to be careful to not self-implode and make things even worse.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

Okay, yeah, so this is going to be whiplash from that last story for sure, which is good! Hopefully it shows I’ve grown a lot over all these years. Lol. Apple is releasing in theaters this December a movie called The Banker, starring Samuel L. Jackson, Nicolas Hoult, and Anthony Mackie. It’s the true story about the first African American bankers who had to hire a white front man and pose as a janitor and chauffeur to buy their first banks. They were incredibly successful until Congress investigated them and everything came crashing down around them. It’s written and directed by a friend George Nolfi, who did Adjustment Bureau, with Matt Damon, and wrote Oceans and Bourne franchise scripts.

I’ve also have a stoner comedy which I wrote-directed and star in called Manifest Destiny Down: Spacetime coming out this Halloween. I made this film specifically for the two up-and-coming stars in it. They play two co-eds Toby and Kara that wake up after blacking out Halloween night and realized they’ve missed the evacuation of Earth. It’s really science vs. religion. Totally, absurd, goes into Einstein’s struggle with Quantum Mechanics and spoofs what happens if Trump’s re-elected. The world goes to hell and a company call Amasnoogle tries to hunt down the recently discovered Theory of Everything from Toby. Ever see the play Waiting for Godot? If you know it, you’ll get this film on its deepest levels. For movie buffs, there are all sorts of sci-fi Easter eggs spoofs. Made for anyone who digs eighties films, it’s just a fun ride — but you can’t take it too seriously cause its so low budget — and that’s the point. It’s experimental, even educational, because we really wanted to play with the real science of Quantum Mechanics, which is totally illogical. So, this film takes you right towards the spiritual and philosophical edge, poses the huge questions, things you can’t really do on big budget films. Science and religion seem closer than ever. And its satire, so I recommend people watch it with friends and play a drinking game … Watch to see which of your friends gets what’s going on before the other does. And a lot of the audiences that have seen the film, and it has won a festival and been nominated for audience choice awards, say they needed to see it again — and when they do, they get it on an entirely different level.

And right now, I’m finishing postproduction on another film, a beautiful classy jazz era romance starring Tessa Thompson (Men in Black), Eva Longoria, and my producing partner Nnamdi Asomugha. This film is a call back to the films of a bygone era for sure. There’s incredible original jazz music in it that we produced at Capital Records in Hollywood with the best studio musicians in town. We shot all over Los Angeles interestingly enough, for New York around 1960. All the beautiful backlots in town, Paramount, Disney, Warner Brothers. It’s amazing that period is better found here in LA than in New York since that city has changed so much. I’m excited to see where that film lands distribution wise. We hope to see that out in 2020.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

My producing partner and I are all about this subject. Our company iAm21 Entertainment which we founded when he left the NFL a few years ago made the film “Crown Heights” which won the Audience Award at Sundance, then was bought by Amazon and distributed theatrically two years ago. We develop and produce content that’s inspirational and hire a diverse crew at every level. The stories we make are geared towards messages that hopefully heal the divisions in our society. The Banker and the untitled jazz era film are definitely in sync with that mandate. We have a big slate of projects coming down the pike that look to move such issues forward too. We feel a duty to make these kinds of stories, even though it’s very often risky and less about the profit. There’s real financial risk all over film, but especially content that isn’t superhero scale and selling to the mass audience.

I worked on forty or so films while I was at a major studio, doing marketing and some production. I liked about four of the films personally, artistically. I felt really proud of those. The rest where work, and that’s okay, not in my taste but others loved them. Some films have to pay for others you want to make is usually the way this business works. I’m very very fortunate to be able to work on things I care more about now in my career. It’s a very long road, and not exactly for everyone, considering the level of sacrifice you have to make. But I think generally speaking society as a whole has to be more willing to make sacrifices towards the greater good to correct some of the wrongs of the past, and deal with the issues that are still very real for society today. We shouldn’t be so selfish. It’s tough, but I try to approach most of my work, whether I’m developing a project for a client or a partner, or teaching someone to sing, thinking, what can I do for this person? How can I put what I want second? What service am I providing them? Or if it’s as big as a film, what service am I provided the audience by making this movie? What’s the message? And is that something that I can sleep well at night knowing that I spent my life on. These projects take so much time and energy, you better believe in what you’re saying in your soul. You better be okay with what your gravestone might say or what people might say about you at your funeral.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Relax
  2. Slow down
  3. Enjoy the ride, it’s a marathon, not a sprint
  4. Save money every day
  5. Don’t spend more than what you make

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Variety is key. I used to be told, Jon, you have to pick one thing, and focus on that. I never listened. I loved every single creative thing I laid my eyes on. Really. I found it all rewarding and fascinating. I love seeing how they all interrelate, they somehow connect, and synergize into some greater piece of whatever. In this business, there are so many jobs, so many things you could do with your passion and talent. It’s endless. And it’s always evolving. It never stops. I think you have to look at the entire space with curiosity, and keep learning, keep expanding, and actually learn from every single person you work with. Everyone’s got something they can teach you about — what they know from their perspective. Doesn’t matter what it is. Nobody knows everything, it’s impossible. They’re just too much to know. So, for me, the collaboration is key. The variety of the projects, the people you work with every day, and their uniqueness is an amazing way to stay stimulated. Go with whatever the future holds.

And then, of course, you have to pace yourself. My partner and I try to really cut the weekends out for family or personal time. He has a family, I just unplug, work out, and try to go to Malibu and ride my bike or whatever to take my mind off of work. You really have to find your quiet time and protect it. I have to warm my people — listen, if you try to reach me on a Sunday — you won’t hear back from me… Nnamdi will, because he’s also one of my best friends and we love to talk — but work-work… no. Talk to you Monday.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Thank you, but first of all, I am not a person of enormous influence. I’m actually just a pretty quiet guy who talks on the phone most of the day, checks email a lot and occasionally gets dragged out for a meeting, for class or to shoot whatever. But thank you for that boost of confidence. I think we all need to hear that sometimes.

I believe the greatest confusion in civilization’s history hinges around our spirituality, and now, the lack of respect for our planet. We’ve always had a lot of faiths at battle, and people tend to be pretty disrespectful to one another about which one is right. The problems with that seem to have intensified in my lifetime because we live in a more global village, we communicate at lightning speed compared to when I was growing up. Change is faster than ever; social, economic, but some people are operating in old systems of understanding that won’t evolve with the times. Now, paradoxically, this rate of change is actually really good news. I think we’re living at an incredible time. To see national boundaries falling because of greater communication, economic connectivity, social media? Information sharing and technology is an incredible equalizer and bonds distant people together like nothing we have ever seen. And because of our continued disrespect for mother nature we can no longer ignore the result of over consumerism across developed countries. We need to implement the economic measure where companies that produce goods and services have to also factor in the cost to the environment. The GDP is an outdated concept. There is a next level social contract that needs to extend globally. I believe science is the answer to many of the issues we all face together, despite what faith we subscribe to in our private lives, we have to work together now. You may believe in any god you want, that’s fine, as long as it doesn’t interfere with the fact that we all have to live together on one planet, and that planet is telling us that she’s sick.

The truth of the matter is that we live disconnected from our nature; we’ve grown desensitized and selfish for our way of lives, the comforts. Our rich societies are so spoiled. I made a movie in India and it was the greatest experience of my life. Changed my perspective entirely. We want what we want, and we don’t understand the ramifications of the manufacturing system that got us that good in the first place. Plastic is on the top of my hit list. It needs to go — now. We can do it. Renewable energies and their technologies should be seen as an opportunity for new industries to help the old die. They’re obsolete. It’s time for them to go — now. We are such a smart species, we have the means to solve these issues, but we have to stop the vitriolic rhetoric (usually originate from our different backgrounds in faith and education). The insults across party lines ruin our democracy, especially in the past decades. And, if the politicians aren’t going to get along, then we need to vote with our dollars, every day. We must get down to business and remember, the consumer has the greatest power. We exercise it literally — every single economic transition we make. Sacrifices are necessary, sure. What generation hasn’t made sacrifices? My grandfather was in three wars. Three… fighting for freedom and democracy… for our way of life?

Everyone, and I mean the world, has to work together now. It’s kind of now or never. For the planet. This is the biggest deal humanity has faced, and the good news is, I believe it’s going to bring us all together. Not divide us. That’s the only way this works out.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

My mother was a teacher. A very passionate, strong willed, liberal, intellectual, charismatic, friend to so many. She challenged my brother, my father and I, on a daily basis when she was alive, to be the best we could be at whatever we were doing. Her passion in life was teaching. She taught teachers how to teach special needs kids like me. She got her master’s in education when she was teaching me how to read because, as I mention, I’m dyslexic and reading was and still is tougher for me than for most people. I read slowly. I don’t think that’ll ever really change. My brain works differently, and I’ve grown to work with it, not against it.

My mother died suddenly at age 45 of a stroke. We were going to school at the University of Michigan in Ann Arbor at the same time together. I was in my junior year and she was starting her Ph.D. in education. She changed my life in a way that I think only a mother or father can. My father’s a hero too, don’t get me wrong, he’s the musician in the family that gave me this DNA where I can’t keep my hands off a musical instrument. They both were sort of perfect for me. I won the genetic lottery being born with them. But since my father was the earner, as a lawyer, my mom was more available to instill discipline in me to overcome that disability.

I think mom had a special gift for talking to her students on their level. She was friends with them. We were friends, buddies. She was a serious disciplinarian too, don’t get me wrong, but she valued education above all else. She was an advocate for it. She would take on the school board, or my teachers — even when I was the one who had messed up. She was a mother bear — her kid could do no wrong. I think every kid needs to have that kind of love. That unconditional, — my kid rocks — sort of support.

When she died, I stopped performing, stopped singing. Before she died, that was sort of my thing. I took up entertainment but did everything but perform for a very long time. I was lost. About five or so years after she had died, I was going through a bad romantic break up, living in New York, and I sat down at my keyboard to sing a song, you know how us musical theater dorks might do. But I couldn’t hold the song in tune. I had quite literally lost my vocal coordination. Use it or lose it I say to my students now. That was sort of a rock bottom for me. It was one thing to lose my mother, it was another thing to give up on the one thing she had loved seeing me flourish in after helping me over come dyslexia, music. So, I bought a guitar, in time square of all places, and started to teach myself. I had always wanted to learn but didn’t really have the willpower to overcome the pain on your fingers. It hurts at first! But this was the motivator. I started writing songs, and didn’t stop, started singing, in private, but that’s all I really needed to do.

A few years later, I was at Sony and sort of in the dream job of all dream jobs. Who wouldn’t have wanted to work on all these great films at a time? Tons of people would have killed to have my job in town. But for me, I was still a fish out of water. I would go home and write songs at night on my guitar or my piano. Eventually I had written so many it was sort of ridiculous… what is all this stuff? It all started to add up to a story, really a musical journal about my struggles as an artist, New York, the whole thing. At that time, another friend of mine, working at Sony died, a young girl, of brain cancer. Lisa Rothenberg. That was it. It was another sign from the universe that, I needed to jump off the ledge of security again and follow my passion for music. Go back to what my mom saw me doing as a teenager. Go back to being myself. All of myself. So, I got all my money together, put it behind this insane song that fit pretty well into the short film format and started to produce that. I would direct it, star in it, it was a satire about my romantic troubles at the time and that reoccurring nightmare that we all have about waking up in public naked. Needless to say, after a certain point, I had a lot of amazing people wanting to help and I had to decide, make the movie or leave the studio job. I left, two weeks later I shot the short at my old office building… half naked mind you. It was quite the stunt. I don’t think people really knew what was going on, but talk about jumping off a ledge. Creatively and career wise.

Ultimately, that short paid off. It kicked of my artist development studio JB Studio LA. Singers, performers, all sorts of creative people started asking me to help them, sort of do what I had done. And it, the universe, just kind of started to take me on this road that you find me on now. I don’t think everyone who has a dream has to go through what I have. I hope not. But when I look back at all the failures, all the tests, all the times I took my own money and did something nuts with it… I think my mother would be proud of me. I think she knows.

Can you please give us your favorite ”Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Change is the only constant in life.” Heraclitus of Ephesus, a Greek philosopher, said that. I thought that for years before I looked it up and realized I probably read that in college and forgot who to attribute it to. People come into our lives and leave our lives for different reasons all the time. Our bodies are quite literally different down to the particle every seven years or so… every single particle is new. So, eat right! Lol. Physicists teach that we are quite literally waves of energy. Complicated, little tornadoes of highly organized information. Storms of anti-entropy in a vast sea of cosmic chaos.

I really have enjoyed working on this film Manifest Destiny Down: Spacetime. It has taught so much outside of filmmaking. I just can’t believe the physics that I never got introduced to because I was too busy singing and dancing when I was younger. Man, what a shame. But after all this time, to catch up a little bit with what’s happening at places like Cern? Wow. These people are seriously, seriously smart and discovering some truly mind-bending concepts. Time is an illusion of our biological constructs? Get out of here. Particles “entangle”, so they can mirror each other over enormous distances? Logic as we know it is completely upended with this stuff. I got hooked doing the research for it, now I’m obsessed.

So back to the point, “change is the only constant.” I don’t think anything I’ve ever come across captures the essence of life so perfectly. It works on so many levels.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

Brian Green. He’s a physicist that I’ve been following for a few years now. He’s just doing such a great job teaching truly mind-blowing concepts to people like myself who have a lot to catch up on. He makes science relatable and fascinating. He’s an inspirational guy and I’m really grateful for his efforts and career. I’m grateful for all the physicist out there pushing the boundaries of our human potential. I wish we didn’t live in such a strange world where people are so resistant to facts and live in their own peculiar echo chamber these days. This is why my mother was so dedicated to teaching. We really don’t give enough support to teachers and now we’re kind of paying the consequences. Hopefully, we can right things. I believe the scientist are on the right side of history, we’ll get through this political chaos and get back to moving in the right direction with policy soon. People just need to get out and vote. Especially the young people. I think they get it.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Jbprodinc.com

Instagram: JBStudioLA

Twitter: @jbstudiola

Facebook: @JBStudioLA

www.jbprodinc.com

Also check out Manifest Destiny Down: Spacetime at

Instagram: manifestdestinydown

Twitter: @mdd_spacetime

Facebook: @spacetimemov

www.Manifestdestinydown.com

This was very meaningful, thank you so much!

    Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

    You might also like...

    Community//

    This is a New a World : Let’s put an end to the international economic abuse

    by Isabelle-Anne Belanger
    Community//

    Resilience Begets Success

    by Kimsea Brooks
    Community//

    My Interview with 12 Archangelic Teachers: A Heavenly Gift for Humanity

    by Nathalie Virem

    Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

    Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

    Thrive Global
    People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

    - MARCUS AURELIUS

    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.