Community//

Feeling Overwhelmed?

Rather than watching T.V for hours on end, constantly checking social media… whatever it is that you want to do now, challenge yourself to not do it. Instead, ask yourself what are some things you can you do and get lost in doing them? These are different for everyone, some people; cook, bake, lift weights, […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.

Rather than watching T.V for hours on end, constantly checking social media… whatever it is that you want to do now, challenge yourself to not do it. Instead, ask yourself what are some things you can you do and get lost in doing them? These are different for everyone, some people; cook, bake, lift weights, run, write, draw, read, paint or DIY. It helps to make a written list of what you already know makes you feel worse and then make a list of things to try to get busy at. When you write these down, ideas will come to you sooner and you will also have a plan that you can follow.

Coping Statements

Telling yourself not to feel a certain way or denying your feelings only puts extra pressure on you.  Coping statements which have been shown to help chronic pain sufferers endure pain can be used as a way of overcoming the physiological effects of emotions:

  • I have done this before, and I can do it again
  • These are just feelings, they will go away when I’m busy
  • I may not feel like doing this now, but if I cope and carry on then I will feel better
  • I don’t need to rush, I can take things slowly
  • I’m stronger than I think
  • What do I need to do right now?
  • I don’t need to eliminate stress, just keep it under control

Nasal Diaphragmatic Breathing And Buteyko Breathing

The way we breathe can either aggravate our calm our emotions.  Nasal diaphragmatic breathing or Buteyko breathing for anxiety is used to calm panic attack sufferers and will work for you too:

1. Sit upright or lie down on the floor, get comfortable.

2. Close your mouth, breathe in and out through your nose. Do not be concerned if your nose is blocked, it will become clearer as you use it.

3. Put one hand on your belly. Notice it rising as you breathe in and falling as you breathe out. Place the other hand on your chest, try to keep this hand from moving.

4. Just focus on feeling the rising of your belly as you breathe in, and the falling of your belly as you breathe out. Do this for a while.

5. When you are ready, after you breathe out, hold your breath for 3 seconds, count it: 1, 2, 3 then breath in. Calmly breathe out and count again 1,2,3. Repeat this breathing pattern of holding your breath after you breathe out for at least a few minutes or until you feel at ease.

Recap

Starting and continuing despite our thoughts and felt emotions is the greatest habit we can form. We take control, it is this that gives our lives freedom. Whether you do one or all of these exercises, your ability to create this habit will grow.

    Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

    You might also like...

    Community//

    A Letter to My Younger Self

    by Brigid Geary
    How To Deal With Grief During The Holidays
    Community//

    How To Deal With Grief During The Holidays

    by Jessie Connor
    Zivica Kerkez / Shutterstock
    Thriving Through the Holidays//

    Numbing for Coping With Stress, Especially During the Holidays

    by Emma Viglucci
    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.