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Erinn Bridgman: “Comparison is the thief of joy; Stay in your lane, gal” with Dr. William Seeds

“Comparison is the thief of joy”- MANY women struggle with “imposter syndrome” because they are comparing themselves against a false belief of another woman. Stay in your lane, gal! DO YOUR THING! The world needs YOU or you wouldn’t have been created. Don’t make yourself smaller or less impactful because of the power of comparison […]

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“Comparison is the thief of joy”- MANY women struggle with “imposter syndrome” because they are comparing themselves against a false belief of another woman. Stay in your lane, gal! DO YOUR THING! The world needs YOU or you wouldn’t have been created. Don’t make yourself smaller or less impactful because of the power of comparison in your life.


Ihad the pleasure of interviewing Erinn Bridgman, Founder & CEO, Bridging Herstory LLC, helping women achieve high income goals.

Erinn Bridgman is a business and sales expert, podcast host, speaker and founder of the Bridging Herstory Community. As a certified StrengthsFinder thought leader and a 6-figure entrepreneur, she has a proven track record of helping women triple their revenue and income in under a year!


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us a bit about your “childhood backstory”?

Asa little girl, I was always a dreamer. I wanted to leave a legacy with my life and always came up with ways to impact others and start creative businesses. I planned neighborhood events like the bug club in my garage to a cooking club where we created different culinary experiences in middle school and decorating cakes for my dad’s company. I’d pass out flyers in my neighborhood for my newest business venture and always used my imagination to see what I could create and bring into the world.

What was the catalyst from transforming your hobby or something you love into a business? Can you share the story of your “ah ha” moment with us?

I always wanted to dabble in photography but there was definitely a learning curve and it was quite expensive to properly get started and. However, after years of desire, I took my graduation money from college and took a $100 workshop to learn how to shoot on manual. I knew I wanted to keep developing this art and interacting with people, as it’s my favorite thing EVER. It just made sense to get them behind my camera, monetize the shoot and capture some special memories. After I got a taste of it all, I couldn’t help but expand.

There are no shortage of good ideas out there, but people seem to struggle in taking a good idea and translating it into an actual business. How did you overcome this challenge?

I could go on and on about this as a business coach. I always say these three things have to line up in order for your idea to make sense:

I could go on and on about this as a business coach. I always say these three things have to line up in order for your idea to make sense:

  • Are you incredibly passionate about it? Does it bring you joy?
  • Does is bring great impact and beauty to the world? (ex: is there a significant need you are fulfilling, hence people would pay for it)
  • Do the “$$” make sense? LONG TERM. Sure you will do something you love for almost nothing in the beginning but that won’t last. Is there a long-term growth strategy?

What advice would you give someone who has a hobby or pastime that they absolutely love but is reluctant to do it for a living?

You won’t know until you start and try. Identify steps and create a short-term plan for how you can “experiment.” Pull the boat closer to the dock before you can jump. But you actually need to do some playing and experimenting so you can get a taste for it.

It’s said that the quickest way to take the fun out of doing something is to do it for a living. How do you keep from changing something you love into something you dread? How do you keep it fresh and enjoyable?

I think this is a limiting belief. At the end of your life, you will have spent 90,000 hours doing “work” — you should probably love all of those hours, don’t you think!

What is it that you enjoy most about running your own business? What are the downsides of running your own business? Can you share what you did to overcome these drawbacks?

I am doing work that my soul was literally made to do. I get to see women’s lives change every day — their personal beliefs about themselves, their thinking and habits transforming right in front of my eyes. And the best part? We get to build their business in sustainable and impactful ways. Ultimately I want more women with good spirits, compassion, and rootedness in love to become incredibly wealthy. This is how the world will change. I get to help women triple their business income and then translate that into personal wealth building.

Downsides? You work alone often. You must be intentional about creating a community of accountability and support.

If you don’t work, you don’t get paid. There’s never a guarantee of a paycheck- but there’s also not a cap to that paycheck either!

Can you share what was the most striking difference between your actual job and how you thought the job would be?

I don’t really understand this question? My job as an entrepreneur?

You are in a continual process of learning and growing when you run your own company. You will continually be surprised but also delighted with changes.

Has there ever been a moment when you thought to yourself “I can’t take it anymore, I’m going to get a “real” job? If so how did you overcome it?

VERY VERY RARELY. I quit my full-time job two and a half years ago with a “year trial” of experimenting how I would like this whole full-time entrepreneur thing. A few months in, I knew I could never turn back. My impact is not limited. My creativity is not stunting. My income is not capped. I’ll never go back.

Who has inspired or continues to inspire you to be a great leader? Why?

I surround myself with a really intentional community. Many entrepreneurs’ one complaint is loneliness. It doesn’t have to be. Life is full of choices. I’ve focused my time and energy on creating a community. I started a book club with other growth-minded women, joined a mastermind for other high-achieving, abundant women, and co-started one myself. I have a success partner I speak to weekly. A dream partner I talk to monthly. I selected a mentor in the city and asked her to take me under her wing. We also meet in person monthly. This is how I continue to be a good leader. I surround myself with like-minded people and I’m never the smartest in the room.

How have you used your success to make the world a better place?

HELL YES! Everyday 🙂

What are your “5 Things I Wish Someone Told Me Before I Started” and why? (Please share a story or example for each.)

Hire a coach — I 10x my company in a year in large part to this investment

Build a community early– I take pride in knowing I am a helper and connector in bringing like-minded people together

Keep track of your revenue, expenses, and profit — This seems like something everyone is doing. THEY AREN’T! I coach many women and a majority do not know these numbers. We sometimes discover that some revenue streams are losing them money. You can do this work on your own.

Don’t give up on one of the essential reasons you started into entrepreneurship — the lifestyle. This is what my mentor told me in our recent lunch over delish omelets. I was sacrificing the lifestyle I wanted by overworking (because I love what I do), but that is a long-term going to lead to burn out

Do ONE THING really well before you start anything else. Wait at least 6 months before you jump into a new or even a nuance of what you are currently doing. A common theme with women I used to coach who were in the start-up phase of business was trying to execute too many things at a time. As creative women entrepreneurs we are full of lots of ideas. And lots of good ideas one but need to tackle one first, if not, it will result in less cash and steam to keep going!

What person wouldn’t want to work doing something they absolutely love. You are an incredible inspiration to a great many people. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger.

I am also very passionate about eliminating loneliness for female entrepreneurs. I do that strategically with my clients and with small local initiatives, but plan to expand this so it impacts women across the nation!

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Comparison is the thief of joy”- MANY women struggle with “imposter syndrome” because they are comparing themselves against a false belief of another woman. Stay in your lane, gal! DO YOUR THING! The world needs YOU or you wouldn’t have been created. Don’t make yourself smaller or less impactful because of the power of comparison in your life.

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US with whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this if we tag them.

ELLEN Degeneres, no explain needed.

Thank you for these fantastic insights. We greatly appreciate the time you spent on this.

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