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Emotions at Work – The Skill Your Employees May Be Missing

In the work environment, emotions impact leadership, interactions between co-workers and the effectiveness of communication in teams. How employees respond to events, co-workers, clients, and situations drive not only your company but their careers and overall health. While emotions are an integral part of the human experience and permeate the workplace, expressing how we feel […]

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In the work environment, emotions impact leadership, interactions between co-workers and the effectiveness of communication in teams. How employees respond to events, co-workers, clients, and situations drive not only your company but their careers and overall health.

While emotions are an integral part of the human experience and permeate the workplace, expressing how we feel can be difficult, and sometimes uncomfortable. For some, just identify how they feel is a challenge.

How can you help your employees better manage their emotions and increase their resilience? Teaching them how to handle adversity, face challenges, and shift their attitude about emotional stressors by developing emotional granularity.

Dr. Lisa Feldman Barrett, the author of How Emotions Are Made: The Secret Life of the Brain, defines emotional granularity as using emotion words, adding descriptors, allowing for greater distinctiveness in identifying our emotions.

Can it be as easy as increasing our emotion words? Absolutely.

Many adults still don’t use their words to define and understand their experiences and the emotions surrounding them…Merely finding a label for emotions can be transformative, reducing hugely painful, murky, and oceanic feelings of distress to a finite experience with boundaries and a name.” – Susan David, PhD

The more emotions words your employees have, the greater the granularity, the more resilient. The trick to emotional granularity (and workplace resilience) isn’t just adding words, it is learning to work with the inherent tools we already have at our disposal to help everyone better manage the emotions we produce. 

This is why I created The Resilience Recipe. The program is designed to improve company culture through concise, actionable training that gives management and employees the tools that they need to increase resilience, reduce stress and develop within and outside of the organization.

The Resilience Recipe is beneficial for any organization. Since every organization is unique, I offer bespoke courses based on your goals and needs. Contact [email protected].

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