Emmanuelle June: “Be nice to yourself”

Be nice to yourself. Don’t listen to slander from haters…they are very bored and sad people. There are far too many examples of instances when this sentence applies. Another thing to know is that: True friends celebrate each other’s wins — someone only reveling in your misery in the pretense of being supportive but then never congratulates […]

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Be nice to yourself. Don’t listen to slander from haters…they are very bored and sad people. There are far too many examples of instances when this sentence applies. Another thing to know is that: True friends celebrate each other’s wins — someone only reveling in your misery in the pretense of being supportive but then never congratulates you when good things happen — is not a friend.

Have fun with what you do; explore and experience the deepest depths of things, and play with them.


As a part of our series about music stars, I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing Emmanuelle June.

Growing up mostly in Stockholm, Sweden, Emmanuelle’s background as an actress offers a versatile set of talents clearly demonstrated both on stage and on screen. After performing in several productions off-broadway, June moved to Los Angeles and became more and more engulfed in the music scene, jamming with friends and manifesting lyrics from her poetry. June performed in post-punk and psych-rock bands briefly before focusing her energy on her solo career as Emmanuelle June. She has performed at famed Los Angeles locations such as The Hotel Café and Moroccan Lounge with her band at the time, Whisper. She is also a published writer under various nom de plumes. Having been featured in notable publications like LA Weekly, Buzz Bands LA and Louder Than War, it’s safe to say that June’s eclectic style and creative vision are establishing her as a true artist to watch.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

I grew up mostly in Stockholm and London. I used to write poetry in black Moleskins (exclusively), I would sit at cafes drinking coffee, and smoking cigarettes (even though I don’t really smoke) of course I was wearing a berêt; this was in between- and after acting-, and dance classes in Covent Garden…I was very deep, immensely dark, and serious. As cartoonish as this sounds — it actually did do something to my “voice” I don’t mean in the sense of making it husky, but to my “voice” as a storyteller; it was my adolescence. It was self-exploration. From there I’ve gone many places since, but that was the mark of the beginning for me on the path I’m on.

I have so much more fun with my work now; the way I see humour in things has changed, and with that my instrument feels free. Nowadays I only write in red Moleskins…

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

Art is a calling; I don’t feel it’s your choice…art chooses you, and you can try running from it but you’ll never get away; it’s like a divine source and/or a demon within and from above and below. It’s as described in Federico Garcia Lorca’s “In search of Duende”; I love that book, it’s one of the books I always bring with me.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

There are so many, one day I will write them down.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Drinking tequila before a show. Being tipsy on stage is not a good idea (at least not for me). Onstage is a heightened reality; there’s this electric, brutal, and vulnerable life and death / “heaven and hell” awareness…adding tequila to that concoction gave me terrifying anxiety.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I have the second half of my current project ready and waiting in the curtains to drop. I’m currently writing new music, along with a screenplay.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

Of course, there needs to be diversity — everyone should be represented in film and television! Sick social conditioning and racism (also sexism/chauvinism/misogyny — I had to throw that in) have reigned the entertainment industry for far too long. It’s crazy it has taken so long to even begin to raise awareness.

Diversity makes much better movies and tv shows. Watching stereotypes and caricatures on-screen is terrible; that kind of writing is not only ridiculous to watch; but truth is, it is dehumanizing propaganda…and it breeds ignorance, objectification and violence. We are not objects; not colours. We are people. Society must recognize the truth of Oneness, everyone’s right to equality and the birthright of all which is having — and being free to use ones voice. Society needs to stop the separation and the objectification; the whole concept of creating “the other” simply; to create separation based on colour or gender in film and television that for example “so and so can’t — or can only play; the lead role/ or the hero/ or the villain” is straight-up political warfare, and bondage.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

Be nice to yourself. Don’t listen to slander from haters…they are very bored and sad people. There are far too many examples of instances when this sentence applies. Another thing to know is that: True friends celebrate each other’s wins — someone only reveling in your misery in the pretense of being supportive but then never congratulates you when good things happen — is not a friend.

Have fun with what you do; explore and experience the deepest depths of things, and play with them.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Meditation — whatever that means to you. Take care of your body and mind. Quit toxic habits and quit toxic people. Setting your boundaries and standards is crucial for well-being.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

A program that sets up weekly mandatory self defense training for girls and young women in school. This is something that may sound like a minor thing; however, it would create a major impact on so many levels. Girls are “made” passive by society at an early age (there are too many examples to show how)… Physical activity, and in this case something that brings them a state of self-sovereignty and helps them recognise that they alone own their bodies, and have the right to take up space, and the right to and knowing how-to defend themselves if someone tries to trespass upon their space.

Of course this along with programs teaching kids kindness and equality. Boys need to be rewired too, big time (I don’t have the knowledge nor experience of growing up as a boy so I can’t speak for ideas on how to work with that.)

To put things simply: We all need to rewire and leave behind outdated gender roles. Men need to learn from an early age that it’s wrong to mistreat and abuse women. Women need to learn from an early age to not accept abuse and to stand up for themselves. ALL need to learn to respect and to be kind to each other. Everyone is gifted differently, and has different interests and talents and different needs in order to grow and different ways to take in information — that type of individualism needs to be encouraged.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

There are so many people I am grateful to in different respects and aspects; naming only one wouldn’t be right. So instead I’m just going to say that I am grateful to myself for my discipline and perseverance.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“You can never truly know what’s going on in someone else’s life” — this is why we must practice kindness, though also knowing that someone going through difficult times is in no way an excuse for abusive or toxic behaviour.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

My dream lunch would be with Harry Houdini…that’s not an option 🙂

Seriously though; I have faith that people who are meant to cross paths will do so naturally when the time is right.

How can our readers follow you online?

Instagram @emmanuellejune & my website www.emmanuellejune.com

I did also sign up to Twitter quite recently @JuneEmmanuelle

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

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