EJ Dalius gives an insight into food allergies and its management during COVID 19

It is essential to understand allergies, whether seasonal or food allergies. Common cold and flu is unrestrained and adds to the issue of COVID 19. Amidst these trying times, health should be a predominant factor. Excessive pollution and changing seasons have given rise to allergies in addition to the coronavirus. Common flu is also seen […]

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It is essential to understand allergies, whether seasonal or food allergies. Common cold and flu is unrestrained and adds to the issue of COVID 19. Amidst these trying times, health should be a predominant factor. Excessive pollution and changing seasons have given rise to allergies in addition to the coronavirus. Common flu is also seen as COVID 19, whether or not the symptoms are for it. Although the typical flu symptoms are similar to the virus, there are a few differences between them.

Allergy at the time of seasonal change

Seasonal allergies occur during the change of seasons when an individual is vulnerable to dust and other particles in the air or a particular food type. Allergies have a few common symptoms, such as watery eyes and nose, irritated throat, cough, congestion, and breathing problems. The symptoms of COVID 19 are slightly different from allergic reactions, with fever, muscle cramps, and lack of taste and smell. – Eric Dalius.

Vulnerability to the virus

People with existing allergic reactions have to take care of themselves during the outspread of the virus, thereby protecting themselves from dust and pollen. Studies have not revealed any increased risk of COVID 19 for allergy-prone people. The novel coronavirus can affect any person, and people must take every precaution mentioned to them. Norms of social distancing, frequently washing of hands, and wearing a mask are few prevention measures.

Allergies among children

Children are very energetic, and it is not easy to stop their sprightly movements. Thus, they are highly susceptible to allergic reactions. They may have the flu and the common cold symptoms or be allergic to various food items. You should take the child to a pediatrician to get the correct diagnosis lest the child may suffer. Allergies can directly impact the child’s brain and affect their motor development, says Eric J Dalius. It is essential to understand allergies and quickly respond to the signs so that your child does not fall sick very frequently and has a healthy life. Children’s immunity system is still in the developing stage, and they cannot combat the toxins present in the environment.

Allergies from particular food items

Food allergy is the abnormal reaction of your body after eating a particular type of food. The condition of COVID 19 introduces extraordinary challenges for food allergy patients. In a crisis, it is strenuous to find safe and healthy food that can provide optimum nutrients.

Here are a few food items that a large number of people are intolerant to

Milk

Many people are intolerant of lactose and cannot digest milk. An allergy occurs when people cannot absorb the proteins from milk. Children are often prone to this kind of allergy during infancy, and some of them get over it as they grow up. There are various alternatives to milk, such as soy milk, almond milk, coconut milk, etc.

Peanuts

Another common food item that leads to allergies is peanuts. Peanut protein does not do well to all and is harmful to immunity as it causes allergic reactions. Some people are intolerant towards the smell of peanuts as well. If you are one of those, then you must check food labels before consuming any product that may have peanuts.

Wheat

Many people opt for gluten-free products since they might be allergic to wheat protein. Wheat allergy can be grueling for people as the majority of cereals from wheat. Food such as bread, noodles, and pasta are commonly eaten every day and might be difficult to avoid if you are wheat intolerant. The alternative to wheat is oats and flour from rice, bean, and other homemade allergen-free food items.

Raw fruits and vegetables

Allergy from a particular fruit and vegetable is also common among people. A majority of allergy patients are intolerant to eating or even touching fruit or vegetables. They may experience discomfort and severe itching on touching a raw fruit or vegetable like tomato, papaya as the protein from it is similar to pollen.

Monitor the severity of the allergic reaction

If allergy symptoms are not severe, and the patient only suffers from mild itching and swelling, it is advisable to use antihistamine and treat the patient at home. You can seek help from your general physician if you need it. However, it is essential to contact the nearest emergency center and pay a visit in case of persistent symptoms.

Seek medical help for allergy during COVID 19

If you or your loved one has an allergic reaction during the pandemic, it is sensible to rush them to a health care provider. Although some people may be hesitant to seek medical help due to the risk of coronavirus exposure in the emergency ward, yet it is vital to seek necessary precautions and admit them, says EJ Dalius. Some hospitals conduct health screenings and temperature checking to ensure the safety of patients during such trying times. Therefore, you should not be reluctant if your friend or family needs help.

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