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Dr. Susan Nicholas: “Trust your innermost feelings”

I lost my mother in January of 2021. It was the first time that my 11-year-old son would experience a wake and funeral with burial. Days prior to the actual wake and funeral, my son expressed his fear of seeing a dead body, stating that he had ‘never seen a dead person in real life’. […]

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I lost my mother in January of 2021. It was the first time that my 11-year-old son would experience a wake and funeral with burial. Days prior to the actual wake and funeral, my son expressed his fear of seeing a dead body, stating that he had ‘never seen a dead person in real life’. In that moment of time and space, I had a conscious conversation with my son about death and we read together The Death of Cupcake: A Child’s Experience with Loss. You see the year prior; my son had lost his paternal grandmother, but she was cremated, and he did not experience the full funeral and burial experience. So, when it came time for the viewing of his maternal grandmother, I said to my son that he did not have to view the body if he was uncomfortable. But in that moment, he took my hand and said, “Mommy, I want to see her.” He then preceded to view his grandmother without fear. Then the most interesting thing happened; my son was not only brave, but he stood at the casket comforting many of the adults who would come to pay their respects. He remembered the teachings in The Death of Cupcake, which I believe allowed him to make closure and fully expressed his emotions, including his fears.


As part of my series about “authors who are making an important social impact”, I had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Susan Nicholas, a physician and surgeon who after a conscious awakening, transitioned her life founding her eponymous organization SusanNicholas.org. Today, she is a life transformation guide, energy healer, and international speaker. Her speaking platform is The Frequency of Money, where she inspires audiences to positively transform their relationship with money. Susan is a TEDx presenter on Money Consciousness: Overcoming Generational Poverty. As the founder of the Human Consciousness Consortium Publishing, Dr. Nicholas is a three-time author of “The Duality of Being”,“Two Parts of Me”, and “The Death of Cupcake”. Susan also hosts the Be Conscious® Podcast. Her diverse work has a common thread to awaken humanity to consciousness. She is a frequent guest podcaster for international medical and business influencers. Susan’s perspectives and works have been featured in the Associated Press (AP), SWAAY Media, Thrive Global, The Native Influence, TEDx, FOX News, and NBC.


Thank you so much for joining us in this interview series! Before we dive into the main focus of our interview, our readers would love to “get to know you” a bit better. Can you tell us a bit about your childhood backstory?

I was born in a rural Pennsylvania community to a 17-year-old mother with a 9th grade education. I was her second child. In my early life my family lived in poor conditions. From an early age, I embodied the energy of scarcity and deprivation which played out in elaborate scenarios throughout my life. Despite being the first in my family to complete college and graduate from medical school, I remained soulfully deprived until I experienced a conscious awakening in 2012. In my professional career, I was first a chemist before attending medical school. I trained as a cardiothoracic surgeon and made a massive career change when I realized I was unfulfilled in my medical career. Thereafter I went to business school, started a healthcare company, and gave birth to my son before my awakening. From 2012 onward, I knew there was something more to my purpose in life than the physical reality I was living — only I was too afraid to leave my job and regular paycheck to begin the journey into my conscious work. After 4 years of feeling like I was rolling an enormous boulder up hill, I closed my healthcare company and began working as a healthcare investment analyst at an equity investment firm. In September of 2016, I was fired from that investing job and given a severance package. I remember telling myself at that time that “I am not afraid — that I am now going to do what I am meant to do.” And that is when I fully embraced my conscious journey, with all of its inherent fits and starts, ups and downs, learnings, and triumphs. I believe there are no failures in life as long as you learn something from the experience.

When you were younger, was there a book that you read that inspired you to take action or changed your life? Can you share a story about that?

When I was 10 years old, I saw a movie adapted from the book entitled “The Elephant Man”. I was so thoroughly disturbed that the mere thought of the film or book sent me to sleep with sad nightmares for years afterward. The only part of that story that comforted me was the role of the compassionate doctor, Sir Fredrick Treves, who cared for and befriended Joseph Merrick. It was at this time in my life that I decided to become a doctor. That movie adaptation sent me on a trajectory into clinical medicine in search of my life’s purpose.

Can you share the funniest or most interesting mistake that occurred to you in the course of your career? What lesson or take away did you learn from that?

I spoke about the trigger which propelled me into a career as a physician and surgeon. But what was most interesting about that was once I achieved that goal of becoming a cardiac surgeon, I realized that I was not fully in my purpose. Imagine that. What I learned from that experience is that sometimes we pursue careers from certain drivers in our lives, from certain experiences that we had; kind of like the experience I had with seeing a difficult movie at a very impressionable age.

What I learned was that my true purpose was not just treating diseases of the physical body, which I was so deeply disturbed by as a child, but my calling was really much deeper. I am passionate about healing what many of us call the soul or spirit. Through many iterations of self, I learned that my true passion and calling was to heal what ails the soul — That transforming energies of the soul ultimately cures many types of illnesses in the physical body.

Can you describe how you aim to make a significant social impact with your book?

I write adult and children’s books from a place of conscious awareness, addressing the most difficult topics for us to discuss from a societal standpoint. My children’s book series, for example is designed to create a platform for parents and their children to discuss difficult life challenges from a child’s perspective. The first title in my illustrated children’s book series is entitled Two Parts of Me: I Am More Than My Body. In it, children are reminded of their infinite nature and connection to the source of all creation. Two Parts of Me guides children to recognize that the feelings emanating from inside of them are ultimately meant to guide them.

The second title in my illustrated children’s book series is The Death of Cupcake: A Child’s Experience With Loss. From my energy healing practice and through the lens of consciousness, I came to realize that many children are not given the space to make closure when a loved one transitions because physical death is not readily discussed. Furthermore, many children are excluded from funeral or burial proceedings. Thereby, the unresolved feelings and emotions surrounding the death of a close family member or friend are often carried into adulthood. I wondered if by involving children in the conversation surrounding death, might we learn from them, and in doing so create a space for them to grieve to completion. If we as a global community could perceive death as a transformation, would we not overcome our false fears of finality, recognizing the refined eloquence of passing.

Can you share with us the most interesting story that you shared in your book?

The most interesting stories are in my first book, The Duality of Being: Perspectives from Multidimensional Travel. It is written for adults and looks back at all of life, including childhood. One of my favorite memories described in the book is about my baptism in a southern-style Baptist church in the late 1970’s, before I started the first grade. I think I like this story because it was at this early age that I began to question my life and the foundation of the belief systems I have had to overcome since my conscious awakening. The story goes like this…

One extraordinary Sunday, I was to be baptized, along with my brothers and a few cousins. I suspect my grandmother must have arranged the spectacle in an effort to save our souls. I remembered seeing adults baptized in the church on past occasions, but I had not seen kids baptized before. My mind told me that this was not an ordinary occasion but an all important one. There was a different kind of energy in the Chapel on baptism day. It was not the usual old ladies in fancy hats fainting or waving their hands high in the air saying words like, “Thank you, Jesus” and “Praise the Lord.” My cousins and I thought such scenes were particularly funny and we would giggle and mimic the fainting ladies. On baptism day, there was an unmistakable reverence in the air, a kind of witnessing of hope. An anticipation of something better to come.

Although I knew it was a very special day, I had no idea what it meant to be baptized. It just looked like being dunked under the water. Deep inside, I felt terrified.

I thought it strange that I was getting baptized in my nightgown and footie socks. All the grandkids were dressed in our pajamas. There were six of us in total, not one of us over the age of 6 years. The pastor gave his big sermon. I do not recall a single word of it. Then it was time to be baptized. We all stood up and walked single file toward a mysterious door that let us behind the pulpit. Being baptized was an experience out of the ordinary. On that day, we all were on our best behavior. I was not the first to go, so I stood in line and waited my turn. I remember thinking how brave everyone was. No one voiced any concerns. The pastor would say a blessing and dunk the kid whose turn it was under the water.

When it was my turn, I walked up three or four stairs and found myself at the edge of a large rectangular pit filled with water. It was dark water, and I could not see to the bottom. There was a large mirror over the pit that allowed the congregation to see what was happening during the baptism. I notice the pasture standing in the middle of the pool, fully dressed from head to toe in a suit and a big, colorful velvet robe. The water was deep, covering his waist. He extended his hand to help me down a couple of steps into the water. The water was warm to my surprise and soft. It moved gently. When I was completely down, I walked a few steps on my tip toes toward the pastor, the water covering my chest. The Reverend lifted me onto his feet, and I noticed that he was wearing his leather shoes. Just like those that had come before me, he said his prayer for my soul and then whispered to me, “Hold your breath.”

When it was over, the six of us were paraded, dripping wet, in front of the congregation. I can only imagine what that must have looked like. I am so grateful that Instagram was not invented in the 1970s. I do not remember feeling any different after my dunking, just wet and exposed. But I was now baptized according to an old southern tradition, I believe. I guess that is when I officially became a Christian.

What was the “aha moment” or series of events that made you decide to bring your message to the greater world? Can you share a story about that?

My “aha moment” occurred in 2012, during the time of my conscious awakening. It was the time in my life that I came to the realization that reality is a concept far beyond our physical world. During this time in my life, I was experiencing a period of intense sadness and wished no longer to exist. I had so many questions about my own life and that of the entirety of human existence that remained unanswered. In that moment, I believe I was given a gift — the gift of conscious awareness. For me, conscious awareness looked like having out-of-body experiences. Prior to this time in my life, I had only knowledge of this phenomenon from my medical training where I had witnessed people being resuscitated in the Emergency Room, the ICU, or who were otherwise near death, describing experiences outside of the body. When this happened to me, I thought perhaps it was my time to transition as well. And I was not afraid.

What I came to realize was there is a latent ability within us to wake up consciously and to experience the expanse of the universe. To awaken to the true nature of consciousness. From that experience I began not only to see my own life, but that of the whole of existence from it profound and renewed perspective. The perspectives I gained from my awakening and my out-of-body travel enabled me to heal my relationships and to find my true purpose in life. It enabled me to overcome the many challenges that had held me back from experiencing fulfillment and personal actualization. From these experiences, I knew that I wanted to share these messages of consciousness with humanity.

Without sharing specific names, can you tell us a story about a particular individual who was impacted or helped by your cause?

I lost my mother in January of 2021. It was the first time that my 11-year-old son would experience a wake and funeral with burial. Days prior to the actual wake and funeral, my son expressed his fear of seeing a dead body, stating that he had ‘never seen a dead person in real life’. In that moment of time and space, I had a conscious conversation with my son about death and we read together The Death of Cupcake: A Child’s Experience with Loss. You see the year prior; my son had lost his paternal grandmother, but she was cremated, and he did not experience the full funeral and burial experience. So, when it came time for the viewing of his maternal grandmother, I said to my son that he did not have to view the body if he was uncomfortable. But in that moment, he took my hand and said, “Mommy, I want to see her.” He then preceded to view his grandmother without fear. Then the most interesting thing happened; my son was not only brave, but he stood at the casket comforting many of the adults who would come to pay their respects. He remembered the teachings in The Death of Cupcake, which I believe allowed him to make closure and fully expressed his emotions, including his fears.

Are there three things the community/society/politicians can do to help you address the root of the problem you are trying to solve?

The problems by conscious platform and works address centers around global emotional health and spiritual well-being. Our schools, communities, and public figures can truly help society at large by encouraging children and adults alike to trust in themselves, to believe in themselves, reassuring all persons of the availability and the deservedness of resources. Many of the social issues plaguing the world today are related to the inequitable allocation of resources that exacerbate fears and reinforce beliefs of scarcity. I delivered my TEDx presentation “Money Consciousness: Overcoming Generational Poverty” to address these issues. Beliefs and experiences of lack are at the root of many social and political ills. My works, whether in authoring conscious books, public speaking, podcasting, or life transformational guidance center around dismantling limiting beliefs of deprivation and building self-confidence, self-worth, and self-awareness, creating an openness to infinite possibilities.

How do you define “Leadership”? Can you explain what you mean or give an example?

The definition of leadership that I like the most comes from Martin Luther King’s definition of power which is “the ability to achieve purpose and effect change.” I would add to that definition that leadership is by

example and as a leader you are entrusted with the privilege of listening to and giving voice to the most disenfranchised while raising up all who walk beside and behind you. A true leader has an expansive perspective realizing that she will learn from everyone, thus encourages collaboration.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Follow your heart. Do what you love to do.
  2. Trust your innermost feelings. Our feelings are purposeful and meant to be felt.
  3. Allow yourself to be guided by your intuition. All the answers are within you.
  4. The most important achievement in life is unconditional love.
  5. Do not chase money. Instead, be in service to humanity and the money will flow.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

My life amounts to no more than one drop in a limitless ocean. Yet what is any ocean but a multitude of drops?”

– David Mitchell

I love this quote because it reminds me that each of us, in every effort we make, no matter how small or of perceived insignificance, makes a difference. Who we are, what we say, do, think, and feel matters.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US with whom you would like to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

I would absolutely love to have a private breakfast or lunch with Oprah Winfrey. I would like to sit down with Oprah because I have been intrigued by her openness and influence in the realm of spirituality. It took me quite a while to be comfortable having conscious discussions with others. I am inspired by her journey and would be honored to learn from her. I would also like to share thoughts and insights into human consciousness with Oprah.

How can our readers further follow your work online?

Interested readers can visit my website at www.SusanNicholas.org to learn more about me and my conscious works. Listen, rate, and review the Be Conscious Podcast on Apple Podcasts. Find my adult and children’s titles on Amazon and Barnes & Noble. Readers interested in topics related to money consciousness and overcoming generational poverty are welcomed to view my TEDx.

This was very meaningful, thank you so much. We wish you only continued success on your great work!


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