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Dr. Cindy Trimm: “Once you make a decision, the universe conspires to make it happen”

I want to build a case for faith and hope — faith in knowing that within our global collective in times past and in the most challenging moments of crises, there always arose great innovators, dreamers, and “imagineers” who pushed humanity forward with their novel ideas, scientific breakthroughs, and life-saving innovations. From the invention of penicillin to […]

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I want to build a case for faith and hope — faith in knowing that within our global collective in times past and in the most challenging moments of crises, there always arose great innovators, dreamers, and “imagineers” who pushed humanity forward with their novel ideas, scientific breakthroughs, and life-saving innovations. From the invention of penicillin to chemotherapy, we see how human potential finds its fullest expression during history’s darkest hours. Cultural and medical points of inflection prompted by disasters, wars, plagues, and disease brought us to revolutionary discoveries that went on to strengthen humanity for generations. The present civic challenges to health, education, and economic disparities amidst cultural, social, spiritual, financial, economic, commercial, geo-political, and governmental challenges lead us again to an opportunity to push humanity forward. My intention for stating the obvious is to build a case for hope. Humanity has always found a way forward, and the current challenges will only continue to push us forward as a global human family. The world into which we were born no longer exists. There is a demand for new industry-specific thought leadership and workforce skill sets. Our educational institutions must prepare students for new workplace demands and global employability. I believe the educational space should focus more on the needs within civic society and the marketplace for critical thinking and problem solving, and less on bestowing degrees. The 4th Industrial Revolution is here. The future is now.


As a part of my series about “Seeing Light at the End of the Tunnel: 5 Reasons to be Hopeful During This Corona Crisis,” I had the pleasure of interviewing Dr. Cindy Trimm.

Cindy Trimm has dedicated her life to serving God and humanity. A best-selling author, Trimm is a sought-after empowerment specialist, revolutionary thinker, and transformational leader. Her best-selling books The Prayer Warrior’s Way; The Art of War for Spiritual Battle; Hello, Tomorrow!; Commanding Your Morning and her newest release, Goodbye, Yesterday! have sold more than one million copies combined.


Thank you for joining us! Before we dig in, our readers would like to get to know you. Can you tell us a bit about how you grew up?

I was born into poverty, the sixth of seven children, raised by a single mom in the island country of Bermuda. Right out of high school, I began working in the office of an optician. I was loved by the patients as well as my boss, and although he spoke of my future as a business associate, I did not have the resources to go to school. I eventually left that job and took positions in various industries, such as finance, banking, education, and government — until I found myself in politics. I went from working in government to being government. I served my country in the senate with a portfolio of health, social services, and housing. One day, after a very long but successful debate, I felt I needed to resign to pursue something bigger, and that’s when I decided to immigrate to the United States. The Premier, aka Prime Minister, aka President, encouraged me to stay because I was being groomed to be the first woman of color to hold that position in the history of my nation. However, just as my first pair of glasses gave me clarity of vision, the day I chose to pay attention to that inner prompting, I gained clarity of mind.

I got CLEAR about what I really wanted to do and who I wanted to be — someone who would be remembered for putting an indelible mark on the world and taught others to do the same.

I got CLEAR on problem-solving strategies that have since helped me in the boardroom, the bedroom, in my community, my country, and the world. So, while others adopt children and animals, I adopt cities and help governments innovate solutions to widespread health, education, and economic disparities.

I got CLEAR about effective leadership and business strategies to help organizations grow and prosper during both good times and bad — strategies that helped turn this once poor girl from Bermuda, abandoned by her father, who lived in a rat-infested, leaky-roofed, food-desert home into a British-American multimillionaire.

I got CLEAR about the type of clientele I would serve, advise, and consult — billionaires, influencers, and industry leaders at the top of their game; subject matter experts, including gamechangers in medicine, law, government, industry, and media.

I got CLEAR on my personal brand.

I got CLEAR on how to invent and re-invent myself.

I got CLEAR on what made me different and therefore more marketable.

I got CLEAR on the most valuable skill I had — the ability to learn, unlearn, and relearn.

I got CLEAR on the fact that I could have it all, without needing to do it all as a woman.

Is there a particular book that made a significant impact on you?

I have always been an avid reader of both fiction and nonfiction, although nonfiction is my favorite. Currently, I am consuming books on technology and thought leadership, however,

as an early teen, these were the books that impacted me the most:

  • The Night Runners of Bengal by John Masters
  • Man’s Search for Meaning by Viktor Frankl
  • Pedagogy of the Oppressed by Paulo Freire
  • The Road Less Traveled by M. Scott Peck
  • Oh, The Places You’ll Go by Dr. Seuss
  • The Greatest Secret in the World by Og Mandino
  • Think and Grow Rich by Napoleon Hill
  • As A Man Thinketh by James Allen
  • Unbought, Unbossed by Shirley Chisholm

These books resonated with me because they enabled me to see the world through the lens of other people from other places and backgrounds and time periods. I love language and the use of words, so reading books has shaped my skill as an author. Books have also given me a larger vision of what is possible for my own life, as well as for humanity.

Do you have a favorite “life lesson” quote?

I have several! People who know me have often heard me say: “Could things be the way they are because you are the way you are? What one thing can you change that could change everything? But don’t just change, be the change you want to see in the world.” Also, “No matter how far you’ve strayed or how badly you’ve messed up; no matter how horribly you have failed or the condition of your life at this very moment, you are always one decision away from living the life of your dreams.” And, “Rejection is redirection. Painful as it may be, it is simply an indication that a person or realm of influence no longer has the capacity for your greatness, giftedness, or personality.”

Other favorite quotes include: “Once you make a decision, the universe conspires to make it happen” (Ralph Waldo Emerson) and, “When we are no longer able to change a situation, we are challenged to change ourselves” (Viktor Frankl). However, I have been most inspired by the words of Lord Chesterfield, “Know the true value of time; snatch it, seize it, and enjoy every moment of it. No idleness, no laziness, no procrastination: Never put off until tomorrow what you can do today.”

Do you have a story about how that was relevant in your life or your work?

Time is money: To know the value of time, ask someone who has missed the last flight of the week out of a country. My transportation to the airport was late and I arrived, checked in, and proceeded to the gate. The airplane was still on the ground and as I walked swiftly, I watched at the ground stewardess closed the door. My begging was not enough for her to reopen the door, so I had to wait until the next day. The next day, I had a very important meeting that I was now unable to attend, which started a chain of events that I did not recover from financially for about two years. Time is money!

How do you define leadership?

Leadership is a realm from which agents of change create influence that alters the way we do life. It is the exercise of influence that brings stability, direction, and confidence to the community, country, or organization in which a leader serves. As John Maxwell says, “Leadership is influence; nothing more, nothing less.” And in the words of Robert Dilt, “Leading is the result of using one’s role and leadership ability to influence others in some way. It is often about influencing others as much by one’s actions as by one’s words.”

Leadership is the ability, talent, and skill to influence others to follow an idea, vision, directive, or goal. Leadership is the exercise of authority — it is the opportunity given to ordinary people to do extraordinary things. “Leadership is the capacity to influence others through inspiration generated by a passion ignited by a purpose. True leadership has very little to do with what you do and is fundamentally a matter of who you are. True leadership is self-discovery. True leadership is the impact of one’s commitment to self-manifestation” (Myles Munroe). Leadership is a process. Nothing happens in a vacuum. We live in what is commonly known as a VUCA environment. VUCA is an acronym introduced by the U.S. Army.

College to describe the increasingly Volatile, Uncertain, Complex and Ambiguous post-Cold

War world in which we live. More currently, it has been used as a strategic leadership approach in regard to a wide range of issues facing both for-profit and nonprofit organizations.

Can you give examples of such leaders?

When I think of leaders who harness this type of leadership power — those who personify the above characteristics — I think of Martin Luther King, Jr., Mohandas Gandhi, Nelson Mandela, William Wilberforce, Sir Winston Churchill, Abraham Lincoln, and Sun Tzu.

Let’s move to the main focus of our interview: As the United States faces a series of unprecedented crises, what is your take on the current cultural climate?

We live in truly tumultuous times, where problems and socio-economic gaps, health, and educational disparities have been highlighted by geo-political inflection points. There are grass- roots, ground-swell protests that demand we all pay attention. Social distancing brought on by the current pandemic, the suspension of business operations nationwide, the stock market turning into an economic roller coaster, and a string of senseless and unconscionable murders have created a stress-filled global climate, work instabilities, economic uncertainties, and an atmosphere filled with anxiety. Meanwhile, climate change, health disparities, income inequalities, racial unrest, and other issues, continue to manifest frustration, distrust, fear, and anger.

While these problems can seem overwhelmingly disheartening, retrospectively speaking, history has repeatedly taught us that there is no reason to lose hope — because those pain points point us toward solutions that not only solve our immediate problems, but also shape the next generation of leaders, innovators, and history makers who move humanity forward. History has also taught us that we have the collective intelligence amongst ourselves to consistently find solutions to the world’s biggest problems — and our current state-of-affairs is no exception. In a myriad of ways, today’s technological advancements and resources give us greater opportunity than ever before to confront our societal ills. Daunting though they may seem, there is yet great hope for humanity. Yes, our world is in the midst of some of its most challenging crises. I believe that in our generation we have the elements of a perfect storm. I equally believe that some of history’s greatest thought leaders are being birthed out. As Albert Einstein stated, “The world as we have created it is a process of our thinking. It cannot be changed without changing our thinking.” And as Voltaire said, “No problem can stand the assault of sustained thinking.” This means we are challenged to change from old thought processes and paradigms to new thinking and new paradigms. Just like you cannot get clarity of vision without an updated prescription, you cannot get to a new reality with outdated thinking. Each day a new frontier stretches out ahead of us. Don’t let who you are today prevent you from being all you could be tomorrow! We must innovate — innovate our industries by first innovating ourselves. One of the most important areas in which innovation is so important is the creation and development of new methods, movements, and organizations that provide great benefit for the world as closed ecosystems. Great examples of this are the Internet, Facebook, Google, and Amazon. The U.S. has become a super-power nation because of its innovative capacities.

Which particular crisis would you like to discuss with us today?

Health, economic, and educational disparities.

Why does that resonate with you so much? This is likely a huge topic.

These pain points have started a global movement that confirms the magnitude of an augmented humanity awareness that is needed.

Can you briefly share your view on how this crisis inexorably evolved to the boiling point that it’s at now?

There has been an escalation of a situation that did not start with police brutality, nor the excessive and unjustifiable use of lethal force that caused the senseless murders of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor, Ahmaud Aubrey, Sandra Bland, Philando Castile, Michael Brown, Eric Garner, Freddie Grey, Trayvon Martin, and Rayshard Brooks, to name just a few. We therefore must begin by first accurately defining the problem, and then deconstructing it in order to find a solution and a way forward. Here is how I would approach this:

1) Define the Problem:

The problem is rooted in a history of slavery that has since supported racial biases ranging from racial profiling to racial brutalization and dehumanization to the weaponization of privileges supported by the 13th Amendment, which ultimately criminalizes color and ethnicity. Black and brown people experience increased policing and incarceration rates, while there are ongoing barriers to resources for oppressed and marginalized groups. But fortunately, in these months of May and June, race has taken center stage in American society, and is now being echoed throughout the world. I don’t think the issue is as much about equality as it is about equity. Economic, educational, and health disparities shine a spotlight on the need to address issues regarding equity.

2) Deconstruct the Problem

Let’s start with the 13th Amendment, then use reverse engineering to deconstruct the problem: “Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction. Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.” Now let me give some historical context: In 1619, slaves were brought to the United States (2019 marked the four-hundredth year of the U.S. African diaspora). The 1776 Declaration of Independence set the precedence for examining a relook at government. In 1807, Thomas Jefferson passed laws to ban the importation of slaves from Africa. And then came the

Civil War in 1861, resulting in the Emancipation Proclamation, which was not fully enforced until 1865. Just to give a cursory understanding of the term “white privilege” — because the first generation of colonialists were white, “white privilege” is culturally embedded in the DNA of our nation. It wasn’t until 1965, one hundred years after the Civil War, that the Civil Rights Act was passed. And yet, generations later, we still see ongoing civil inequities and unrest. Why? Because this is how it was engineered from the beginning: The country is not broken, it is functioning implicitly or explicitly, consciously or unconsciously, as it was engineered and designed. So, what can we do to put a new model on the table so that it functions differently? I suggest a USA 2.0.

As a Christian, I believe that Jesus came to offer us a new model that brings peace, empowerment, prosperity, and an increase in the quality of life that gives dignity, meaning, purpose and hope to every human being. This requires we engage our minds and hearts in manifesting this new model to replace the old — to re-engineer the existing system by utilizing a geo-political, psycho-social, and socio-economic model based on principles of equity.

Can you tell our readers a bit about your experience either working on this cause or your experience being impacted by it?

What resonated very deeply happened when I witnessed countries within Asia, Europe, Africa, and across the Pacific Rim — and many other island nations — protesting with signs that said, “Black Lives Matter.” Imagine that! My heart leaped with hope and faith in humanity. I see that this movement is the proverbial straw that has broken the camel’s back — giving voice to our humanness and to the fact that people everywhere are shouting loudly, “We don’t want to live in a world like this anymore!” These senseless murders touched a deep place in all of us. It’s not about the difference in race, because there is only one race — the human race. It’s about humanity awareness — defining what it means to be human; a movement that affirms that goodness is still at the core of humanity. In the words of J.R. Tolkien, “There is good in this world, and it’s worth fighting for.”

I have been convicted of the fact that to remain silent is a choice, and to remain neutral is a travesty. To do nothing is a crime against humanity. We live in a closed ecosystem. This means as long as there is pain for one, there is pain for all. I have put together a small task force to address the problems and bring new models to the table that will help to mitigate health and education disparities. I have started an “I am the change” campaign to encourage and equip people to affect the kind of positive change they want to see.

Please share your “5 Steps Each of Us Can Take to Proactively Heal Our Country.”

The five steps represent the letters in the word “greet.” I’ve used this word as an acronym to help anyone easily remember how to effectively “GREET change” with an open mind, open heart, and open arms; beginning with hosting “GREET meetings” for the purpose of exercising the following five practices:

1. Gather Create brain-trust to discuss pain points

2. Respect Show empathy, understanding, and respect for the process

3. Engage Define and deconstruct the problem

4. Elevate Share ideas, values, and perspectives, then develop vision, strategies, goals, and objectives…put an alternative model on the table. We must move from protest to progress.

5. Transform Implement (do the same get the same, do different get different)

Kindly share an example. What can we do to make these ideas a reality?

I put together a team of medical doctors, lawyers, and educators for the purpose of “adopting a city” by addressing its health, legal, and educational disparities. We are currently applying for a grant and working on alternative models to bridge these types of gaps.

What specific steps would you suggest for others? Pick a local community problem that you would like to contribute to solving, then host your own GREET Meetings, and influence others to do the same. Take what you learn and your ideas and get involved in local town hall meetings. It all begins with starting a conversation, getting others involved, and finding ways to make your voices heard in public spheres.

Are there things that the community can do to help you promote these ideas?

Of course. Begin by creating cultures of awareness and empowerment. This is a people’s war! We need an all-hands-on-deck approach which takes collective effort and personal sacrifice. We must have faith in an “us” and “we” over “them” and “they.” We must continue to educate and inform in order to mitigate fear — because knowledge is power. We must always be aware, but not afraid. Get involved with problem solving and crisis management discussions: Be a creative and innovative problem solver; attend town hall meetings. If you are a part of a gated community, find out if there are discussions going on and weigh in; if not, start one yourself.

And finally, lobby government to create and draft new public policies. After this all blows over, and we begin the process of recovery, our entire communities will need people of faith to face forward with the belief that we can and will do life better as we find new ways to live together as one big global family. In my dreams, I see a world filled with visionaries, innovators, and dreamers who continue to push humanity forward and inspire others to do the same.

We are going through a rough period now. Are you optimistic that our current challenges can eventually be resolved?

I want to build a case for faith and hope — faith in knowing that within our global collective in times past and in the most challenging moments of crises, there always arose great innovators, dreamers, and “imagineers” who pushed humanity forward with their novel ideas, scientific breakthroughs, and life-saving innovations. From the invention of penicillin to chemotherapy, we see how human potential finds its fullest expression during history’s darkest hours. Cultural and medical points of inflection prompted by disasters, wars, plagues, and disease brought us to revolutionary discoveries that went on to strengthen humanity for generations. The present civic challenges to health, education, and economic disparities amidst cultural, social, spiritual, financial, economic, commercial, geo-political, and governmental challenges lead us again to an opportunity to push humanity forward. My intention for stating the obvious is to build a case for hope. Humanity has always found a way forward, and the current challenges will only continue to push us forward as a global human family. The world into which we were born no longer exists. There is a demand for new industry-specific thought leadership and workforce skill sets. Our educational institutions must prepare students for new workplace demands and global employability. I believe the educational space should focus more on the needs within civic society and the marketplace for critical thinking and problem solving, and less on bestowing degrees. The 4th Industrial Revolution is here. The future is now.

If you could tell young people one thing about why they should consider making a positive impact on our environment or society, what would you tell them?

Discover your passion, maximize your potential, create a platform for your purpose, and connect these to meeting a global need, solving a global problem, or addressing a global issue. Alvin Toffler stated it best when he said, “The secret message communicated to most young people today by the society around them is that they are not needed, that the society will run itself quite nicely until they — at some distant point in the future — will take over the reins. Yet the fact is that the society is not running itself nicely…because the rest of us need all the energy, brains, imagination, and talent that young people can bring to bear on our difficulties. For society to attempt to solve its desperate problems without the full participation of even very young people is imbecile.”

Is there a person in the world, or in the US, with whom you would like to have a private

breakfast or lunch, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them.

I don’t have just one, but many:

1. Barack Obama: I would love to discuss his geo-political views and his solutions to the most pressing global and national problems/issues facing us today.

2. Michelle Obama: I would love to talk to her about her life philosophies as a woman shaping our world.

3. Bill Gates: From one of the wealthiest men in the world to global humanitarian, I would love to discuss and dissect the mind of this incredible thought leader.

4. Elon Musk: I would love to explore the mind of someone who is moving the needle of humanity in a novel way taking us from moon-shot to Mars. I would also love for him to dissect innovation in the 4 th Industrial revolution.

5. Jeff Bezos: All things business.

6. Joel Osteen: I would talk to Mr. Osteen about legacy and next generation of servant leaders.

7. Cornel West: He is my mentor of intellect. I’ve read his works and followed his life. I would talk to him about life, economics, and spirituality.

How can our readers follow you online?

I can be reached or found at:

Website: TrimmInternational.com

Email: [email protected]

IG: https://www.instagram.com/cindytrimm/

FB: https://www.facebook.com/drtrimm

Twitter: @cindytrimm

LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/drtrimm/

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