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“Don’t push yourself too hard.” With Ming Zhao & Kimberly Britt

Don’t push yourself too hard. Yes, it’s important to write every day but setting unrealistic goals will only put unnecessary pressure on you and lead to trouble down the line. Remember that writing should always be fun. When it stops being fun and begins to feel like a chore, step away and reevaluate. I’ve also […]

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Don’t push yourself too hard. Yes, it’s important to write every day but setting unrealistic goals will only put unnecessary pressure on you and lead to trouble down the line. Remember that writing should always be fun. When it stops being fun and begins to feel like a chore, step away and reevaluate. I’ve also found it helpful to have more than one script to work on so you can alternate between them when you get stuck.


As a part of my interview series with the rising stars in pop culture, I had the pleasure of interviewing Kimberly Britt

Kimberly Britt is a produced writer who has written 30 feature length screenplays and 4 shorts. She has placed in numerous contests such as Nicholl Fellowships, Austin, PAGE, Screencraft, StoryPros, Scriptapalooza and recently won the grand prize in Stage 32’s Search For New Blood contest, awarding her a week’s worth of meetings in LA with managers and producers. She currently works as a freelance script consultant and contest reader as well as a ghostwriter.


Thank you so much for joining us! Can you tell us a story about what brought you to this specific career path?

Incollege I took a creative writing class in which my professor was a produced screenwriter. Up until that point, I had been writing novels and short stories but with encouragement from my professor, I realized I had a talent for and love of screenwriting. I’ve always loved movie and writing so it seemed natural to incorporate the two.

Can you share the most interesting story that happened to you since you started this career?

The best thing that’s happened so far has to be winning the Stage 32 contest. I got to go to LA (which was cool all on its own) and meet with managers and producers that were hand picked for me and looking for exactly the type of material that I write. It was overall an amazing experience that I’ll never forget!

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

When I first started working on scripts, I used to write the lengthiest narrative descriptions imaginable. For whatever reason I decided to choregraph the characters every movements and my scripts were massively long. Of course, none of my friends were going to tell me that I was doing it all wrong. Friends want to be supportive and they had no idea what a screenplay should look like anyway. It wasn’t until I paid for my first script coverage that I was told the error of my ways. I’d like to think my writing has tightened up a lot since then.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I just completed a horror script about one of my favorite sub genres which is demonic possession. While I wait to get some feedback on that and see what changes need to be made, I’m moving on to a new horror script with an idea that came to me in a dream. Without giving too much away, it has to do with repressed memories and being able to relive the past with drastic consequences.

Who are some of the most interesting people you have interacted with? What was that like? Do you have any stories?

I wish I did have stories. I was in LA for a week and didn’t run into one single famous person! I did, however meet with some well respected managers, filmmakers and even got to have lunch with an exec on the Paramount lot which was the highlight of my trip!

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Don’t push yourself too hard. Yes, it’s important to write every day but setting unrealistic goals will only put unnecessary pressure on you and lead to trouble down the line. Remember that writing should always be fun. When it stops being fun and begins to feel like a chore, step away and reevaluate. I’ve also found it helpful to have more than one script to work on so you can alternate between them when you get stuck.

Can you share with our readers any self care routines, practices or treatments that you do to help your body, mind or heart to thrive? Kindly share a story or an example for each.

I’m a big believer in yoga to help relax and clear my mind and will often so a few poses before sitting down to write. I also find it helpful to have a good meal first. Don’t give yourself any unnecessary distractions like hunger or thirst. Writing should be your sole focus.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

“This isn’t going to be easy” — I was very naïve when I started writing screenplays. I knew it would be a lot of hard work but it seemed like such a glamorous profession and I had no idea how challenging it would actually be. I assumed that all you really needed was talent and if you had that, the rest would follow along. I had no idea at the time that I would spend the next 20 years chasing this crazy dream of mine.

“Screenwriting takes a lot of time and patience” — Unless you’re Quentin Tarantino or Christopher Nolan, you’re not going to write a script, sell it right away and attend the premiere a year or so later. Screenwriting is a lengthy process and it can actually take years to see your hard work come to fruition, if you’re lucky enough to sell a script and have it actually go into production.

“You’ll meet a lot of naysayers” — If I had a dollar for every time someone has suggested that I get a “real job”, I could produce my own screenplays. Well, maybe not, but I’ve heard it a lot over the years, from friends, family and even an occasional stranger that feels the need to chime in. In order to become a successful screenwriter, you have to want it more than you’ve ever wanted anything in your life, be prepared to work for it and learn to ignore anyone that isn’t supportive of those goals.

“You’ll doubt your talent on a daily basis” — This is something I still struggle with myself. With so many excellent writers out there and brilliant new ideas circulating, it’s hard to avoid moments of doubt. However, you need to be your own number one fan. Believe in yourself and keep working toward your goals.

“No matter how many people give up on you, don’t ever give up on yourself” — This one is pretty self-explanatory. Keep pushing on. Nothing worth having comes easy. Keep writing. Keep reaching out and trying to make connections. Keep seeking out people that share your goals and are supportive of your endeavors. Don’t wait for someone to hand you a writing career. Get out there and make it happen!

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

I saw a quote recently that really resonated with me. “There is no elevator to success. You have to take the stairs”. What I love about this quote, aside from the fact that it’s so true is that it’s universal and relevant to every aspect of life, not just about writing. Anything in life worth having takes time and effort. The harder you work for something, the more you’re going to appreciate it once you’ve attained it.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

As corny as this may sound, I would have to say my mom. She is the one person in my life that has always encouraged me in every single one of my goals. Even when I didn’t believe in myself, she was always there to say just the right thing to talk some sense into me. I don’t think I would be where I am right now if it wasn’t for her.

You are a person of great influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

Again, at the risk of sounding corny, I would want to start a movement that focused on tolerance, as that’s probably one of the biggest issues we’re currently facing. Although we all come from diverse backgrounds with different sets of beliefs, at the end of the day, we’re all united in one common goal which is to live a good life and achieve success in all of our endeavors. If we were able to focus on our goals and helping others achieve theirs despite our differences, we would all be better off for it.

We are very blessed that some of the biggest names in Business, VC funding, Sports, and Entertainment read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might see this. 🙂

I would have to say Stephen King. I grew up reading his books and watching all of his movies. His body of work is one of the biggest reasons why I wanted to get into writing and why my genre of choice will always be horror. Not only would it be cool to chat with him and pick his brain, hopefully some of his talent would rub off on me.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

I’m not cool enough for Twitter or Instagram, but you can find me on Facebook (https://www.facebook.com/kimbritt02) Stage 32 (https://www.stage32.com/screenwriterinparadise), and Script Revolution (https://www.scriptrevolution.com/profiles/kimberly-britt)

Thank you so much for joining us. This was very inspirational!

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