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Decisions = Stress: 5 Ways to Making the Right Choice

Schedule. Your. Week.

I cannot tell you how much I hate making decisions. Where to go out for food, what movie to watch, what to wear. It’s times like these that I’m thankful for having a uniform in high school.

It’s obvious, decisions = stress, but there is something we can do about that, and it all comes down to automating routine activities.

Clothes

If you have a style, stick with it and bulk buy all your clothes in different colours. This won’t work for everyone, but if you’re like me and prefer to just throw something on, having a go-to outfit is a dream for minimising decision-making stress.

I wear specific gym outfits for specific workouts. I have tights that match tops and sports bras that match tights and those outfits never change from week to week. Similarly, once I’ve found a pair of jeans, tights or a jumper that I like, I buy two or three pairs.

Having a signature look is awesome, comfortable and stress-free, especially for regular activities like work or gym– until it comes to formal or dressy events, then we’re all screwed.

Food

Meal prep. And have a bank of healthy snacks that you know will taste great, fill you up and be easy to munch where ever you are, whatever you’re doing.

Restaurants

Eating out has always caused problems for me because portion sizes are way too big, there are always way too many carbs and the salt content is way too high. If you’re out for an unusual meal with family for a special occasion, pigging out on everything is 100% acceptable.

However, if you’re just grabbing a quick bite or eat out frequently, it’s easy to take the stress out of deciding what to eat.

You’ll know your favourite cafes and takeaways, and you’ll eventually get to know the menu as well. You’ll know what types of foods you feel the best eating: foods that won’t leave you feeling guilty or too full.

Sticking to a routine decision eliminates the stress of deciding what you want to eat, versus what you should be eating.

As a health-conscious person, no matter where I go, I’ll order either a soup or a salad and that will be that.

Netflix

Movie and series-watching is serious business. As a Film Studies scholar, finishing a good series causes all sorts of emotional distress, because now I have to find a new one to watch – and the decisions are endless.

As a rule, I will only ever watch a film or series that is rated (by IMDb) between 7.0 and 8.0 and above – unless coerced or at a complete loss.

Although this may not work for you, it is a good idea to review all your favourite series and films to see what they all have in common and narrow down your search to a few select options.

If you are at a loss, I review several noteworthy – in my humble opinion – pieces of entertainment on my media tab.

Scheduling

Have you ever had a plan to go to the gym or take a mental health day and someone wants to hang out with you, but you’re not so super keen? Yep, it sucks, but there is a system that you can put in place to do what you need to do, without sacrificing certain creature comforts to please your, often inconsiderate or selfish, friends and family.

Schedule. Your. Week.

Because I meal prep lunch for the work-week and dinner for every night of the week, I will never go out for a meal unless given a full week’s notice. Once you make it clear that you have a routine, the people who care most about you, and who you care most about, will fit themselves into your schedule.

This goes for socializing as well. If you’re an introvert like me and the idea of going out causes you anxiety, you can schedule certain times of the day or week that you keep open for socializing. Personally, I like to take Saturdays off. I know, and make sure that my friends know, that if they want to see me, they can fit themselves into the days that I spend out of the house – between class or after work – but never on a Saturday and never on a weeknight.

Originally published at theprogressivemillennial.com

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