Community//

Dealing With Loss After the Holidays

While the holidays are a joyous time for many, it is important to remember that life – and loss – continues regardless of the date on the calendar. Some of you may have had to deal with an unimaginable loss of a loved one over the holidays. Dealing with grief during a time when others are […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.

While the holidays are a joyous time for many, it is important to remember that life – and loss – continues regardless of the date on the calendar. Some of you may have had to deal with an unimaginable loss of a loved one over the holidays. Dealing with grief during a time when others are celebrating may cause stressful conflict within, as you may feel pressured to set aside your grief during a time of celebration.

However, whenever you experience a loss, the key is to give yourself permission to grieve. Such feelings are so powerful that if we do not experience and express them, if we do not address them, then they can reside inside, eventually leading to illness.

If you are dealing with a loss suffered during the holidays, here is a simple list of actions you can take to help deal with your grief.

  • First, you must take care of your physical needs. Keep it simple. Drink water throughout the day. Eat nourishing foods, as the immune system is compromised with grief.
  • Be sure to get enough sleep. Grief takes a lot of energy.
  • Exercise. Keep your body moving, even if it is just to go for a walk around the block.
  • Stay away from things like alcohol, drugs, and caffeine whenever possible.
  • Take interior time for yourself. This can be done through journaling, meditation, and prayer, as well as any creative activity that allows you to express actively what is difficult to express orally, such as painting, arts, and crafts, music, etc.
  • Find a grief counselor to guide you and your family through the process. Do this so that at a certain time, on a specific date, you will confront your grief in a safe environment. If necessary, your counselor might temporarily consider a multi-disciplined approach of counseling, medication/anti-depressants, and behavior modification.

The important thing to remember is to treat yourself without guilt, judgment or criticism. Be gentle with yourself, be kind to yourself, and in time, you will come out of the darkness of descent into the light.

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Community//

Coping with Grief

by Sweta Bothra
Community//

Dealing with Grief During the COVID-19 Pandemic

by Alexandra Spirer
Maps Expert / Shutterstock
Well-Being//

Coping with Loss or Estrangement Can Be Harder During the Holidays

by Leah Campbell

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.