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David Meyers: “Put yourself in positions to succeed”

Believe in yourself — if you don’t, no one will Put yourself in positions to succeed — that’s how I met that Broadway director All you need is one yes — I had a play that took off; it was rejected probably 100 times. But all it took was that one yes. I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing David Meyers. As a writer, […]

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Believe in yourself — if you don’t, no one will

Put yourself in positions to succeed — that’s how I met that Broadway director

All you need is one yes — I had a play that took off; it was rejected probably 100 times. But all it took was that one yes.


I had the distinct pleasure of interviewing David Meyers. As a writer, David’s plays have been produced all around the country, and he has two TV shows in development. As an actor, he’s worked with FOX, BET, Lifetime, Danny DeVito, James Franco, and many more.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can yo.u tell us the story of how you grew up?

I grew up in New Jersey, very close to my family and grandparents. And I fell in love with theatre and acting; no one in my family had ever been in show business, but I was hooked and could never give up my dreams of entertaining people and telling stories for a living.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

When I was 5, my mom took me to see “Peter Pan” on Broadway. When it was over, I refused to leave — and told her I wanted to see the play again.

After that, I was pretty much hooked.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

I had a play produced just outside Washington, D.C. After one performance, a couple recognized my photo, told me how much they loved my play — and suggested I send it to their son.

Their son ended up being a Broadway director. He was interested in the script — and then sent it to a two-time Oscar nominee who said he would be interested in doing the play in New York. It was a crazy, one in a million chance — but it happened.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

I went to an audition for a national tour of “Fiddler on the Roof” — a show that I’ve dreamed of doing my whole life — when I was in law school, and thought “maybe I’ll get cast, and this will save me from going to law school.”

Needless to say, it didn’t happen — though I was hoping it would for weeks. It told me that I did NOT want to be a lawyer, and I should pursue things I’m passionate about.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I created a micro-comedy series called “Bloomywood” that’s probably my favorite thing I’ve ever done.

You can see our two-minute episodes at youtube.com/BloomywoodTheSeries

I’ve had showrunners for an NBC sitcom with John Lithgow and a former New York Times TV critic tell me they watched it and thought it was hilarious; I couldn’t ask for a better response.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

I think it’s really important; I’m the only white male in “Bloomywood.”

Everyone benefits from telling diverse stories. I remember that I never went to see August Wilson plays growing up, because I thought “that’s not for me.” Then I started reading them — and saw I had been missing out on truly the greatest series of plays ever written.

I want to learn stories I don’t know — and diversity is a huge part of that.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Stay positive — — no one wants to be around negative actors or people
  2. Believe in yourself — if you don’t, no one will
  3. Put yourself in positions to succeed — that’s how I met that Broadway director
  4. All you need is one yes — I had a play that took off; it was rejected probably 100 times. But all it took was that one yes.
  5. Exercise and stay healthy — I enjoy this more than I do acting and writing

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

The best advice I ever got was to constantly list the positive things in my life — that was from one of my greatest teachers (both in acting and life), Rob McCaskill.

It’s cliche — but gratitude is probably the most important thing to focus on when things aren’t going well. Everyone can be happy when things are working in their favor; being able to be happy when they’re not is the true gift — and Rob showed me that it can be a learned talent

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I wish I had enormous influence; if I did, it would be for more people to speak up for their personal and political freedom — in places like Hong Kong, across the Middle East, dictatorships in Latin America, etc. And now, sadly even here in the U.S.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

I’d list three people Rob McCaskill, Daisy Walker, and Dexter Bullard. They literally saved my personal and artistic life — took huge chances on me — believed in me when I didn’t believe in myself — and kept me going when it seemed impossible to do so.

There are many others, but those 3 came at very pivotal points from me.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Everything is unlikely dear, so don’t let that deter you” — A Little Night Music. It’s the motto of my life.

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

In history, George Washington. Right now — Beanie Feldstein!! I adore her, also love musicals — and think she would be the PERFECT match for my character of Michael Bloomstein in “Bloomywood”!

How can our readers follow you online?

You can see Bloomywood at youtube.com/BloomywoodTheSeries or www.Bloomywood.com

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

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