Countryside Visits and Mental Health

If we have learned anything from the last year, it’s the effects of being stuck in our homes for long periods of time. The sense of being trapped that came with the conditions of lockdown caused untold damage to a lot of us, but we are happy to see a return to some normality. In […]

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If we have learned anything from the last year, it’s the effects of being stuck in our homes for long periods of time. The sense of being trapped that came with the conditions of lockdown caused untold damage to a lot of us, but we are happy to see a return to some normality. In terms of UK visits, travel experts predict a surge in domestic tourism as people opt to take their summer holidays up and down the country. One such place that is expected to be popular this summer is The Trossachs National Park in Scotland.

The Benefits of Countryside Visits

The overriding feeling that many people suffered from in the early stages of the initial UK lockdown was the sense of looking at the same four walls and feeling trapped in an urban environment. The benefits of getting fresh country air when hiking are well known, and many people have been happy to be able to make plans to enjoy camping and hillwalking in the countryside of Central Scotland. Getting out of the city goes a long way to helping us to recalibrate, and The Trossachs is one of the best places to do this.

Activities to Enjoy

The biggest draw for those coming into The Trossachs National Park is to see Loch Lomond. As one of Scotland’s most iconic lochs, people have been delighted by the serene beauty of Loch Lomond for generations. Visitors can find out about the rich history of the area from the water itself on one of the many boat tours that run out of various locations across the Loch. For those who like water sports, a number of different activities can be enjoyed like kayaking and windsurfing. These outdoor physical activities are the perfect antidote for all those days spent indoors last year.

 Hike Your Way to Happiness

As we stated at the top of the article, the mental health benefits of visiting the countryside are well realised. As people, we are not well adjusted to spending every waking moment of our lives in a dense urban environment. With Loch Lomond and The Trossachs so accessible, there are loads of hikes, walks and trails to enjoy all throughout the area. Even if you’re not planning on staying in the park itself, you can still make time to visit and enjoy what’s on offer by travelling from nearby Glasgow.

Experiencing the Landscape

If you’re thinking about taking a holiday to this beautiful and diverse part of the world, it is well worth your while to spend a couple of days here so you can fully experience the landscape. There are lots of different options you can choose from, but the accommodation offered by Cameron Lodges gives you that feeling of being in touch with your surroundings without losing the home comforts we all enjoy.

We hope this article has helped to inspire you to find out more about Loch Lomond and The Trossachs National Park and why a visit to this part of the country has the potential to be highly beneficial to your mental health. Given the tough year we have all experienced, it’s about time we all recalibrated in some of the beautiful surroundings that are right on our doorstep!

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