Community//

Composing Your Own Music

Writing your own music can be a tedious and challenging process. Unlike playing your instrument, which is often hard enough, composing your own music requires emotional, mental, and concentrated focus. Unlike an improvised solo that is impressive, albeit fleeting, the music you write is put into print for the world to see. Think of a […]

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Writing your own music can be a tedious and challenging process. Unlike playing your instrument, which is often hard enough, composing your own music requires emotional, mental, and concentrated focus. Unlike an improvised solo that is impressive, albeit fleeting, the music you write is put into print for the world to see. Think of a solo as a last-minute impassioned speech, and composing music like publishing pages from your diary. Here are a few things to consider when it comes to writing your own music. 

Movement

A lot of good ideas come during times of action. Getting your blood flowing and your feet moving can often help with laying out your inspiration.

Notebook

Consider carrying a small notebook with you at all times. Individuals who are more creatively wired may be more likely to a random burst of inspiration than continued productivity. It helps to have a notebook and pen around to write down the inspiration when it strikes.

Listen 

When it comes to writing a particular style of music, listen to what you love. Listening to other composers and musicians can help you stick to your chosen genre and learn how you write it out. 

Learn

If you’re looking to write more than a simple five-minute song for the recorder, you need to understand some amount of music theory. Start out with understanding the staff, most often used in classical music, but helpful across the board. After you understand the staff, feel free to move onto understanding chord progressions and how to transpose chords. Those essential aspects of music theory are foundational for composing your own pieces.

Tell A Story

Writing a piece of music is often like writing a novel. The music is telling a story. Decide how you want that story to be told. Focus on the emotions intertwined with the dialogue of the chords. What are you trying to say to the audience? What would you like to feel as you work through the piece?

Remember to enjoy the process of songwriting. Your enjoyment is a significant part of the process. If you don’t love what you’re writing, you have less of a chance to finish the piece and be proud of your work. Have fun!

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