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Colton Tapp: “Don’t do it for the “success””

Succeeding in any field is really tough. Don’t doubt your career choice just because it seems wavy sometimes. If you’re an artist, stick with it if you want it because switching to a “normal” career doesn’t mean you have a better chance of succeeding. Rejection and setbacks aren’t a sign to quit. It’s a sign […]

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Succeeding in any field is really tough. Don’t doubt your career choice just because it seems wavy sometimes. If you’re an artist, stick with it if you want it because switching to a “normal” career doesn’t mean you have a better chance of succeeding. Rejection and setbacks aren’t a sign to quit. It’s a sign that you need to keep growing and keep trying.


I had the pleasure of interviewing Colton Tapp, recent winner of the best actor award by the Dallas Horror Film Festival & Best Film at Rack Focus Film Festival. He was raised on a cattle ranch in Dallas, TX and was a charmer from an early age. In fact, one of his first memories was kissing Wheel of Fortune’s very own Vanna White at the age of 2 during a “Most Beautiful Baby” contest in Dallas, in which Colton placed 1st.

In high school, Colton was the morning anchor for the school’s TV News program where he also directed and acted in skits and commercials to sell more cookies for the cafeteria and promote school dances. Following graduation, Colton tried his hand in business, when he started a paintball and skateboard retail store in his hometown. At request of the mayor, he was given the responsibility of designing the city’s first skate park, running a tag of 1M dollars for the finished project and at the peak of it’s run, Colton was operating with employees at several locations.

Now, the rising actor has starred in multiple feature films, including “Three Days In August” where he appeared in Variety Magazine for starring with Barry Bostwick and Mariette Hartley. Other films include “Pi Day Die Day”, “Solar Eclipse: Depth of Darkness” and “The Boundary”. Playing a young, masculine guardian, he also landed a part as series regular in the series, “Believe” about Adam and Eve in modern times. Working on independent projects, simultaneously, Colton’s taken home awards like “Best Actor” and “Best Film” for performances from creepy young father, drugged-out teen brother.

Today, Colton continues his work as an actor, writer and model between Los Angeles and Texas.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Can you tell us the story of how you grew up?

I dipped my hands in everything growing up. I grew up an only child on a small ranch with quite creative parents and their artistic and entrepreneurial influence got me addicted to creating things as a kid. Drawing, painting, building sandcastles, writing songs and of course, making films. To this day, I get the same satisfaction doing anything that creates something from nothing.

Can you share a story with us about what brought you to this specific career path?

After botching an audition for “The Little Rascals” when I was a little guy, I decided to try and star in a play in my town’s community theater. I ended up being the character “Host” in a play entitled “The Game Show”, which sort of planted a life-long seed in me to tell stories.

Can you tell us the most interesting story that happened to you since you began your career?

I accidentally punched Stephen Lang (Avatar / Don’t Breathe) while doing a fight stunt in a scene as John Wilkes Booth in Sri Lanka. He wasn’t too happy with me. For a minute there, I didn’t think I would be “jumping” off the balcony, after all.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Probably my old haircut. When I first started working on camera, I had a curly afro. I wore a t-shirt, tie and curly Afro everywhere I went.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

I’ve been enjoying working on some of my friend’s projects, here locally, this past year. I always say, just telling cool stories is where the fun is. It doesn’t matter if it’s in your backyard or on a studio lot.

We are very interested in diversity in the entertainment industry. Can you share three reasons with our readers about why you think it’s important to have diversity represented in film and television? How can that potentially affect our culture?

I think it’s a natural evolution of story-telling, anyways. As the world continues to see more cultural diversity in various nations across the world, story-telling should represent that as well. I think filmmakers are doing a fine job of that already.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

Succeeding in any field is really tough. Don’t doubt your career choice just because it seems wavy sometimes. If you’re an artist, stick with it if you want it because switching to a “normal” career doesn’t mean you have a better chance of succeeding. Rejection and setbacks aren’t a sign to quit. It’s a sign that you need to keep growing and keep trying.

Which tips would you recommend to your colleagues in your industry to help them to thrive and not “burn out”?

Don’t do it for the “success”. Do it because it’s awesome. Find a good reason to keep doing it or a time will come when you’re going to want to quit and you might just fall for it.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I would love to help someone find their calling and help direct their focus in life, if they’re feeling stuck.

None of us are able to achieve success without some help along the way. Is there a particular person who you are grateful towards who helped get you to where you are? Can you share a story about that?

My dear coach and friend, Lar Park Lincoln (Friday the 13th, VII / Knot’s Landing), has made this journey possible for me.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Go confidently in the direction of your dreams. Live the life you have imagined.” — Henry Thoreau

I don’t need to explain this one. Just do it!

Is there a person in the world, or in the US whom you would love to have a private breakfast or lunch with, and why? He or she might just see this, especially if we tag them. 🙂

Hugh Laurie is my actor-crush. Feel free to tag him, email him, send him a postcard, knock on his kitchen window. However, you can set it up!

How can our readers follow you online?

Shoot me a message. I’ll say hi. @coltontapp on Instagram.

This was very meaningful, thank you so much! We wish you continued success!

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