Chun Chun Chang: “Slow down sometimes”

I bring goodness via my films. We are living in a fast-paced and high pressured society. The concepts of my films tend to be simple and pure. I keep the pacing of the films smooth without any complicated twists or plots. They provide moments of different fantasies for people to glimpse into. I want my […]

Thrive Global invites voices from many spheres to share their perspectives on our Community platform. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team, and opinions expressed by Community contributors do not reflect the opinions of Thrive Global or its employees. More information on our Community guidelines is available here.

I bring goodness via my films. We are living in a fast-paced and high pressured society. The concepts of my films tend to be simple and pure. I keep the pacing of the films smooth without any complicated twists or plots. They provide moments of different fantasies for people to glimpse into. I want my animations to give the audience a momentary respite from reality.


We had the pleasure to interview Director Chun Chun Chang.

Her films Aura and Between the Shadows were selected to screen at the Oscar-qualifying Encounters Film Festival, LA Shorts Fest, RiverRun International Film Festival, Los Angeles Asian Pacific Film Festival, Athens International Film and Video Festival, and many more. Chang’s motion graphic animation On the Run received Top Talent from 2019 Adobe Design Achievement Awards and Boboo Celebration has screened regularly on the headquarter LED wall of Tokyo Broadcasting System.


Thank you so much for doing this interview with us! Before we dive in, our readers would love to get to know you a bit. Can you share your “backstory” that brought you to this career?

For years, I had wanted to become a painter or illustrator. I always had an eagerness for movements, such as acting or dancing, but I got nervous easily on the stage. I used to like to manipulate objects around me, giving them life, but I didn’t think I would be an animator/animation filmmaker. Funnily, I even once thought I would never make any animation because it seemed tedious to spend hours or days crafting a few seconds of animation.

However, due to some coincidence, I entered the animation field, and I soon got fascinated by the movements and storytelling that animation could offer. With animation, my characters and graphics can stand on the stage, be on the screen, for me.

Can you share the funniest or most interesting story that occurred to you in the course of your filmmaking career?

I entered the animated filmmaking career because of an impulsive decision. I knew I wanted to work in art/design-related fields, but I had a hard time picking a major for my undergrad studies. Therefore, I simply picked the one with the prettiest school among those, and it happened to be an animation program. It ended up being the best choice I’ve ever made.

Who are some of the most interesting people you have interacted with? What was that like? Do you have any stories?

It’s easy to know artists from different professions while working as a filmmaker. I always enjoy observing how artists express themselves. Animation people like me tend to have a childlike vibe. Live-action filmmakers are usually friendly and confident. Musicians have a natural elegance. Dancers express themselves with a lot of movements. They are all interesting to me.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

For now, I’m working as a lead artist on an animated short film with live-action director Nirav Bhakta. It’s for the nonprofit organization School of Wheel. The film aims to promote the organization. The story is about a little girl who faces multiple fears in her subconsciousness because of reading difficulties. The film’s visual style will switch between reality and the character’s imagination. I designed the visual looks, VFX, and camera blocking.

Which people in history inspire you the most? Why?

Gustav Klimt. He stated, ‘Whoever wants to know something about me . . . ought to look carefully at my pictures.’

That’s so cool and so true. An artist’s work could speak more about themselves than words.

Let’s now shift to the main focus of our interview, how are you using your success to bring goodness to the world? Can you share with us the meaningful or exciting social impact causes you are working on right now?

I bring goodness via my films. We are living in a fast-paced and high pressured society. The concepts of my films tend to be simple and pure. I keep the pacing of the films smooth without any complicated twists or plots. They provide moments of different fantasies for people to glimpse into. I want my animations to give the audience a momentary respite from reality.

Many of us have ideas, dreams, and passions, but never manifest it. But you did. Was there an “Aha Moment” that made you decide that you were actually going to step up and take action for this cause? What was that final trigger?

I can’t think of any ‘Aha!’ moment. I’m always quite chill but impulsive. I tend to just do it first and then deal with any possible issues later.

Can you tell us a story about a particular individual who was impacted or helped by your cause?

Sometimes, I would receive emails from people who wanted to enter the filmmaking/animation field, asking for feedback or suggestions, but I can’t think of any specific story. However, I’m hoping the animated short film that we are working on for the nonprofit organization could help them receive more attention.

Are there three things that individuals, society or the government can do to support you in this effort?

Support independent movies. Enjoy and respect art and design.

What are your “5 things I wish someone told me when I first started” and why. Please share a story or example for each.

  1. Be open-minded toward things. A lot of good things that happened in my career started with less attractive conditions, but many of them ended up being surprising.
  2. Just do it. This one is related to the one above. Sometimes, it’s good to act rather than spending days or weeks thinking about whether you should do it or not.
  3. Keep negotiating. Don’t shut yourself down because of others’ rejections. I once heard my friend telling me that it’s okay to just ask and be the first to reach out. The worst case is that they might be annoyed at you for a few weeks, but that’s not a big deal. That suggestion is very helpful to me.
  4. Believe in yourself. It’s important to trust your work. There are so many styles and trends in the creative fields. Sometimes it’s good to focus on what you want and what you like.
  5. Slow down sometimes. You don’t always have to be productive and fast-paced. When a situation is making you feel stagnant, why not just enjoy the moment?

If you could tell other young people one thing about why they should consider making a positive impact on our environment or society, like you, what would you tell them?

“Well, why not?”

We are very blessed that many other Social Impact Heroes read this column. Is there a person in the world, or in the US, whom you would like to collaborate with, and why? He or she might see this. 🙂

I couldn’t think of anyone now, but I’m open to any possible collaborations.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

‘Don’t ever explain yourself.’

It’s my recent favorite. I often thought about others’ opinions on what I’m doing or going to do. This quote helps me stand my ground.

How can our readers follow you online?

Website

https://chunchunchang.wixsite.com/chun

Instagram

https://www.instagram.com/run_by_chun_chun/

This was great, thank you so much for sharing your story and doing this with us. We wish you continued success!

    Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

    You might also like...

    image by Alex Kinter
    Community//

    Short Indie Film “Poolside” Racks Up Awards at Prestigious International Film Festivals

    by Daniel Brain
    Community//

    Dr. Tyrha M. Lindsey-Warren of Waco Family & Faith International Film Festival: “Stay Prayed Up! “

    by Ben Ari
    Community//

    Filmmaker Alejandro Lubezki: “Diversity is what makes life interesting. Without diversity all is boring and pointless”

    by Yitzi Weiner
    We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.