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Bianca Williams: “Know your audience”

The main lesson I would like my readers to take away from my novel is to trust your intuition. It will never fail you. My protagonist could have avoided so many pitfalls if she just trusted that still small voice inside. Many times, when we fall in love we can’t see or rather we willingly […]

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The main lesson I would like my readers to take away from my novel is to trust your intuition. It will never fail you. My protagonist could have avoided so many pitfalls if she just trusted that still small voice inside. Many times, when we fall in love we can’t see or rather we willingly turn a blind eye to the truth which is often right in front of us. I want women specifically to find their voices and communicate what they want and need in a relationship and be willing to walk away if they aren’t being respected. Most importantly, I’d warn my readers to not lose themselves in any relationship. Healthy relationships are two-sided and balanced.


As part of my series about “How to write a book that sparks a movement” I had the pleasure of interviewing Bianca Williams.

Bianca Williams discovered her love for creative writing while pursuing a double major in Finance & Management at Chestnut Hill College in Philadelphia. After graduating at the top of her class, achieving a successful career in finance, and co-founding an event planning company, Bianca began penning her debut novel. Sidelined, the award-winning sports romance series is the story of Bryn Charles, an up-and-coming event planner who makes the ultimate rookie mistake of mixing business with pleasure. When she isn’t writing, Bianca uses her platform to empower young women in personal development, business, and relationships.


Can you share a story about what brought you to this particular career path?

I’ve always dreamed of being an author, but I didn’t have a story. It wasn’t until my heart was broken that I got a vision for a project. Once I started writing, I knew that being an author was what I was meant to do.

Can you share the most interesting story that occurred to you in the course of your career?

I attended the Writer’s Digest Conference in NYC right after I completed my first novel Sidelined: The Draft. And even though I’m an introvert, I signed up for a pitch slam. (It’s like Shark Tank for authors). You enter this room full of agents and editors and you’ve got thirty seconds to pitch them on your idea. I was so nervous, I literally couldn’t sleep the day before. To my surprise, 7 out of 7 liked my story concept. Afterwards, I listened to Kimberla Lawson Roby speak about her humble beginnings prior to her successful writing career. I was inspired and filled with a fresh boost of confidence. With my background in business management I decided to bet on myself and self-publish.

What was the biggest challenge you faced in your journey to becoming an author? How did you overcome it? Can you share a story about that so other aspiring writers can learn from?

Sidelined is inspired by true events. In the beginning I really struggled with what facts I could and should share. Ultimately, I overcame it by being clear on my intentions, to write a book that I wanted to read during my breakup. I realized I had a write to tell my story. It would resonate with a lot of women.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

When I first started writing, I made the mistake of hiring a friend who was an English major to edit my novel. I’ve since learned that hiring a really good editor is key. It’s the most important aspect of a novel in addition to cover art. It wasn’t until I received feedback from a reputable literary agent, that I finally decided to find a proper developmental editor. I can laugh about it now, but I was embarrassed when I received the first edited draft littered with red corrections.

What are some of the most interesting or exciting projects you are working on now?

Now that my series is complete, I have time to work on a non-fiction workbook titled, Know the Plays, or get Sidelined — A Playbook for Success in Life, Business, and Relationships. I’ve learned a lot through my experiences that I would like to share with women, particularly those in transition after a serious relationship has ended.

Can you share the most interesting story that you shared in your book?

Each book in the series have really good examples, but I will choose the 24 hours before the 1st big event we planned. The main characters were faced with a total disaster at the event venue that had to be fixed without their NFL client’s knowledge. Without giving away any spoilers, the dilemma they were facing could have destroyed them and their new company. In those intense moments the characters were pushed to the edge. Thankfully, everything worked out and they ended up being thanked publicly on the field of the football stadium the next day. It was a whirlwind. Fun fact, the craziest parts of the series are inspired by true events.

What is the main empowering lesson you want your readers to take away after finishing your book?

The main lesson I would like my readers to take away from my novel is to trust your intuition. It will never fail you. My protagonist could have avoided so many pitfalls if she just trusted that still small voice inside. Many times, when we fall in love we can’t see or rather we willingly turn a blind eye to the truth which is often right in front of us. I want women specifically to find their voices and communicate what they want and need in a relationship and be willing to walk away if they aren’t being respected. Most importantly, I’d warn my readers to not lose themselves in any relationship. Healthy relationships are two-sided and balanced.

Based on your experience, what are the “5 Things You Need to Know to Become a Great Author”? Please share a story or example for each.

The five things you need to know to become a successful author are the following.

#1 Have a plan. I prepare an outline for each novel and create a storyboard. In fact, I utilized a writing software called Scrivener. It’s great because it allows you to work on a chapter at a time and keep it separate so that you can easily make changes as the story evolves.

#2. Write often. Although it’s the obvious thing to do it’s very easy to get distracted. Especially when it comes to the internet. It’s best to establish a schedule for writing and stick to it. Each year I participate in National Novel Writing Month every year in November and join a community of individuals with like-minded writing goals. Their website tools monitor your daily writing and track your word count to help meet your goals.

#3 Find an editor. In order to become a great writer, you must have a great editor by your side. They will ensure that you avoid common grammatical mistakes that immediately turn readers off. I was fortunate enough to find my editor on Instagram. She turned my error ridden novel to an award-winner.

#4 Know your audience. When working on a project, you must know who your audience is and write for them. I identified my target reader early in my development process through a small focus group of beta readers. In the end it’s those that will be the readers who will stick with you, write reviews, and recommend your novel to friends.

#5 Develop tough skin. You must remember that art is subjective. Everyone isn’t going to love your work. You will get that one-star review and I will cut deep. Breathe, let it go, and know that everything isn’t for everybody and that’s okay. Falling to the pressure of that one person’s opinion can have you changing things in your future work which could negatively impact your target audience. I was livid when I received my first 1star review. The person didn’t read past the first page, so I was disgusted. I reeled for about a week or even two. All the while I’m mad with the review, I could have been making progress on my work at that time. I got back on track and received a 5-star review from Readers’ Favorite shortly after. The moral of the story: Stay true to your work and dismiss the naysayers.

What is the one habit you believe contributed the most to you becoming a great writer? (i.e. perseverance, discipline, play, craft study) Can you share a story or example?

Consistency is key. I would write every night and on most weekends after work and when parenting duties were done. I was a single mom of a teen so it wasn’t easy but I have a mantra, ‘there’s nothing that I can’t do.’ Once I committed to the project, I was determined to see it through to completion. I enjoyed the creative process so much that it rarely felt like work.

Which literature do you draw inspiration from? Why?

There is one piece of literature that I draw inspiration from and it’s, The Alchemist. It’s my go-to novel for when I need a quick reminder about our purpose in general. It’s a fairly quick read but each page is like a trail of golden nuggets. I always find the hidden treasures in that book serving me exactly what I need at that moment.

You are a person of enormous influence. If you could start a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

I was a 22 year-old single mom when I went to college. I was working full time during the day and taking a full load of classes on nights and weekends. I managed to graduate a double major and with honors. Although most of the work fell on me, I didn’t shoulder it alone. I had a few friends and family that stepped in where they could. If I’m able to start a movement, I would start a fund dedicated to supporting single moms to further their education. Just because you have a child doesn’t mean you still can’t pursue your dreams. Not only would the fund provide financial resources, but I would also incorporate consulting on how to succeed in life and business by sharing my single-mom story, and the trials, tribulations, and triumphs that I experienced.

How can our readers follow you on social media?

Readers can find me on Instagram, Facebook, and Twitter @bwillbooks.

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