Community//

Bianca Romero: “An inherent assumption that they can do anything they want”

I think women have to prove themselves more, stand more firm, and truly fight for their spot. Whether it’s other women, or men, people are always challenging women who are outspoken and unapologetic about their point of view and voice and about the amount of space they are taking up. Also, women are still sometimes […]

The Thrive Global Community welcomes voices from many spheres on our open platform. We publish pieces as written by outside contributors with a wide range of opinions, which don’t necessarily reflect our own. Community stories are not commissioned by our editorial team and must meet our guidelines prior to being published.

I think women have to prove themselves more, stand more firm, and truly fight for their spot. Whether it’s other women, or men, people are always challenging women who are outspoken and unapologetic about their point of view and voice and about the amount of space they are taking up. Also, women are still sometimes in a competitive mentality as if there’s only a certain amount of spots available for women, so there’s always a level of criticism that I don’t think happens to men. They don’t have to compete and prove themselves as much, I notice there’s an inherent assumption that they can do anything they want.


As a part of our series about women who are shaking things up in their industry, I had the pleasure of interviewing Bianca Romero.

Bianca Romero is a born and bred New York City-based female mixed-media, collage artist, muralist and creative director. Romero’s exposure to art and design was honed early on and influenced by her immigrant parents’ artistic careers, a Korean mother who was a fashion designer and a Spanish father whose graphic design illustrations earned him recognition as one of the top five graphic designers in the world. As a child, after school, Romero hung out in her father’s studio, studying technique and curiously watching him create compelling illustrations and designs for clients such as Atlantic records, Olympics, SONY, and more. These illustrations would go on to be featured on billboards throughout the city. This early exposure to the artistic process had put Romero on her own path to creating visual stories and commentaries through her mixed media collage art. Which is a visual interpretation of the collective elements and experiences of all people, from all communities. Inspired by New York City’s diversity, energy, and its vibrant graffiti art scene. Bianca uses mixed media collage as a visual metaphor for exploring personal identity and the collective pieces that make each person unique, allowing her the creative outlet to explore the human experience through her artwork.


Thank you so much for doing this with us! Before we dig in, our readers would like to get to know you a bit more. Can you tell us a bit about your “backstory”? What led you to this particular career path?

I think I was always destined for this career path. Both of my parents are creatives in their own right, and I grew up watching both of them, studying their techniques, and taking what I learned to create my own path in telling visual stories. I’ve always been inspired by New York’s diversity, energy and vibrant art scene. And my pieces are a visual metaphor for that.

Can you tell our readers what it is about the work you’re doing that’s disruptive?

The murals I’ve created throughout my career are more than just something unique or interesting to look at. They are meant to start a social conversation; to create a visual narrative that addresses current social climates, human emotion, and identity. Most recently, I was honored to introduce my first solo exhibition, The Resilient Ones which celebrated the strength and resilience that we as a nation have overcome.

Can you share a story about the funniest mistake you made when you were first starting? Can you tell us what lesson you learned from that?

Once I painted a mural in the Lower East Side, but without realizing it I went directly over another artist’s work, (which is the nature of street art so I didn’t realize it was a thing) but it was a good lesson in the territory of street art. And honestly for me, I realized that the artist probably had no problem saying something to me because I am a woman. If i was a male artist I don’t think words would have been said, and it made me think about the rarity and importance of taking up space as a woman.

We all need a little help along the journey. Who have been some of your mentors? Can you share a story about how they made an impact?

Other than being influenced at a young age by my fathers career in graphic design, I don’t have one particular mentor. Over the years I’ve luckily had many people around me whether it’s friends, fellow artists, or older more established artists guide and encourage me throughout the years.

In today’s parlance, being disruptive is usually a positive adjective. But is disrupting always good? When do we say the converse, that a system or structure has ‘withstood the test of time’? Can you articulate to our readers when disrupting an industry is positive, and when disrupting an industry is ‘not so positive’? Can you share some examples of what you mean?

Impacting change for the better is when disrupting is positive. We need to be the change we want to see. Recently I partnered with Maker’s Mark to curate a creative campaign in New York that invited visitors and locals of New York to ‘Be Remarkable’ — 2020 has been an incredible year of change and a year of challenges for all. The resilience of New Yorkers and the world has been inspiring, and we’ve impacted incredible change for future generations.

Can you share 3 of the best words of advice you’ve gotten along your journey? Please give a story or example for each.

  1. Stay consistent
  2. Keep pushing to the next level
  3. And really think about what makes you unique, what makes your art unique and stand out, why should people pay attention to you.

We are sure you aren’t done. How are you going to shake things up next?

You’re right. I’m not done. My goal for my art is to be transformative. It’s to encourage viewers to learn more about the subject matter and emphasizes that art reveals there’s more than meets the eye, such as life.

In your opinion, what are the biggest challenges faced by ‘women disruptors’ that aren’t typically faced by their male counterparts?

I think women have to prove themselves more, stand more firm, and truly fight for their spot. Whether it’s other women, or men, people are always challenging women who are outspoken and unapologetic about their point of view and voice and about the amount of space they are taking up. Also, women are still sometimes in a competitive mentality as if there’s only a certain amount of spots available for women, so there’s always a level of criticism that I don’t think happens to men. They don’t have to compete and prove themselves as much, I notice there’s an inherent assumption that they can do anything they want.

Do you have a book/podcast/talk that’s had a deep impact on your thinking? Can you share a story with us?

I like Glennon Doyle untamed when it comes to the topic above. I listen to podcasts a lot when I paint, lately I’ve been listening to the Armchair Expert Podcast because of the wide array of experts covering topics like femininity with people like Glennon Doyle, to Amy Schumer, to interviewing actors like Sean Penn, Edward Norton, to experts and doctors like Neil Degrass Tieson, Malcolm Gladwell, Kamala Harris, Bill Gates, to comedians like Jason Bateman, Kal Penn, Will Farrell, etc.

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

What a question! I think if I could inspire compassion and equality I think our country is in desperate need of both. Compassion and equality across all levels of policy, in the workplace, amongst peers, women and BIPOC people still have to fight for a lot. Women still don’t get paid equally, nor are still treated equally. Pro-choice is still a debate… Movements like BLM still exist because of the lack of compassion and understanding and systemic inequalities that still exist. It’s a tall order and a huge glass to fill but I could help push things forward in that direction in any way, I’d be honored to.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

“Twenty years from now you will be more disappointed by the things you didn’t do than by the ones you did do. So, throw off the bowlines. Sail away from the safe harbor. Catch the trade winds in your sails. Explore. Dream. Discover.” — mark twain

“Women belong in all places where decisions are being made” rbg

There’s probably a ton more in the vein of music and lyrics, I tend to turn to music a lot

How can our readers follow you online?

On Instagram (@biancadoesnyc) and on my website (www.biancaromero.com)

This was very inspiring. Thank you so much for joining us!

Share your comments below. Please read our commenting guidelines before posting. If you have a concern about a comment, report it here.

You might also like...

Community//

Late Night Host Bianca de la Garza is Disrupting Beauty by Encouraging Women to Be Themselves

by Adryenn Ashley
Wisdom//

Diary of Single Women! Thank You — Not! You Judgmental Bunch !

by Anu Ramamurthy
Community//

Bianca Banks Discusses New Podcast Platform and Mental Health

by Skylar Terrana

Sign up for the Thrive Global newsletter

Will be used in accordance with our privacy policy.

Thrive Global
People look for retreats for themselves, in the country, by the coast, or in the hills . . . There is nowhere that a person can find a more peaceful and trouble-free retreat than in his own mind. . . . So constantly give yourself this retreat, and renew yourself.

- MARCUS AURELIUS

We use cookies on our site to give you the best experience possible. By continuing to browse the site, you agree to this use. For more information on how we use cookies, see our Privacy Policy.