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Belonging to a Nation

Belonging to a nation where individuals’ sentiments are molded by flimsy monetary, social, and political circumstances. Psychological oppression, frail common laws, low degrees of education, and economic changes have become profound situated pieces of individuals’ lives. Under such an environment where one cannot even dream of having an ambitious life, I never let any of […]

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Belonging to a nation where individuals’ sentiments are molded by flimsy monetary, social, and political circumstances. Psychological oppression, frail common laws, low degrees of education, and economic changes have become profound situated pieces of individuals’ lives. Under such an environment where one cannot even dream of having an ambitious life, I never let any of these things, including severe asthma, become a hindering block for me, as I had some aces up my sleeve: determination, curious mind, and a deep love for knowledge. My father always used to say, “Life is like an ECG reading; it has its ups and downs. Being alive means facing them head-on and to never back down.” Similarly, my life has many phases, and to judge my life story based on any one of them would be a grave sin. So, this is my life story.
Being blessed with the ability to judge people’s tone easily, I quickly recognized that whenever my family or relatives used to talk to me, they had this tinge of sympathy. For them, I was the “unfortunate kid with asthma”; however, I knew if I didn’t do something about it, I would end up being a person enslaved in the prison of dependence. I have this steadfast belief that being outstanding in academics is not the only way to succeed in today’s practical world. In order to truly gain a holistic perspective on life, one needs to experience their struggles and triumphs independently. I knew that if I wanted to succeed in life, I had to break out of this prison of dependence.
To prove who I really am, I started looking for opportunities to test myself and learn in the process, despite my ailment. The first thing that I did was offer my voluntary community service at the Lions Club vision care camp, a community service organization that provides services and programs at the local and international levels. There I helped with data entry and spread awareness about the camp amongst the citizens requiring financial assistance. Being my first experience of communal service, I learned many things. Served everything on a silver platter, I had never viewed poverty this closely before. It broadened my horizon and gave me many perspectives that we, as global citizens, have an obligation to help those in need. Once I was accustomed to these responsibilities given to me, the sky was the limit. One of the significant turning points of my life was when I became a TA (Teacher Assistant). It purchased truly necessary changes into my life, such as training, the significance of education, time management, and managing troublesome circumstances. The nature of the job got me into a situation where it got tough for me, but I knew that I couldn’t let my sickness overshadow my determination. During my sciences class, I realized something when I couldn’t answer a hypothetical question. Even though I knew the correct answer, I couldn’t express myself due to a lack of communication skills and couldn’t get my set of arguments across to the teacher. Naturally, the next Everest to the summit was public speaking; I participated in debate competitions to improve my message’s conveyance. After participating in several debate competitions, came a time where I can now express my message easily across hundreds of people. PiticStyle
It has often been said that High School can be a difficult phase of life for most of the students, particularly for the individuals who are a bit diverse and don’t pass by the rule book. It was the same for me as I was a shy and studious student; I was an alien to the rest of my peers. I believe the series of events took me to a stage where I have developed as a more confident person. I am more comfortable in my skin than ever before. Going through the tough situation where I had to stand out in the crowd to have the option to make myself obvious for other people or to cause them to acknowledge me is not, at this point, longing for me, as opposed to being steady and ready to meet my life objectives.

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