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“Being frazzled mentally doesn’t allow for me to be thoughtful and purposeful”, with Rhonda Moret

From a personal perspective, trying to do too much hurts my family life and negatively impacts my personal happiness. Inevitably, things go astray and go undone and the resulting in my inability to be the best version of myself. On a professional level, if I am feeling rushed to get a proposal to a client […]

From a personal perspective, trying to do too much hurts my family life and negatively impacts my personal happiness. Inevitably, things go astray and go undone and the resulting in my inability to be the best version of myself. On a professional level, if I am feeling rushed to get a proposal to a client or get a new marketing campaign out, the quality of my work suffers. Being frazzled mentally doesn’t allow for me to be thoughtful and purposeful and the quality of my work product unfortunately reflects that.

As a part of my series about “How to Slow Down To Do More” I had the pleasure to interview Rhonda Moret. With over 20 years of experience working in a communications and strategic marketing capacity, Rhonda Moret has worked with or for some of the world’s most recognized brands including Universal Studios, Subway Restaurants, Nike Golf, the PGA of America, and the PGA TOUR. Moret has also worked with several high-profile individuals including PGA great Tiger Woods, tennis legend Billie Jean King, NFL Hall of Famer Kurt Warner, MLB Hall of Famer Randy Johnson, New York Times bestselling author Robert Kiyosaki, and even Donald Trump. Her work has garnered her media attention and she has been interviewed by Forbes, The Washington Post, Adobe’s CMO.com, The Business Journal, USA Today, and several other publications and other media outlets. Her most current venture is Elevate For Her and Elevated Diversity, a professional development organization dedicated to empowering women and elevating diversity. Programs include unconscious bias, diversity in marketing, strategic negotiations, personal branding, and evolved leadership. Moret is also a professional speaker, offers one-to-one strategy sessions and VIP days, and hosts mastermind groups. Moret lives in Del Mar, California with her family.


Thank you so much for joining us, Rhonda! Can you tell us the “backstory” about what brought you to this specific career path?

My career started in the fast-paced, deadline driven world of advertising when I worked for a top L.A. agency and I knew I had found my calling. I loved everything about the advertising business and felt it was a perfect fit with my skills set and talents. From there I found myself working in the golf industry — where I had no experience with the game but I loved the challenge of learning the game, understanding its draw, and determining the best way to market the products I was charged with promoting. During my days working in the golf industry and as one can imagine, quite often I was not only the only women in the room but also the only minority as well. It was during this time that I began learning of the importance of diversity and inclusion not only in terms of those employees with a seat at the table, but also how to best ensure marketing efforts are inclusive.. And of which — has brought me to my work today, which is to empower women and elevate diversity.

According to a 2006 Pew Research Report report, 26% of women and 21% of men feel that they are “always rushed”. Has it always been this way? Can you give a few reasons regarding what you think causes this prevalent feeling of being rushed?

I am definitely part of the 26% can easily fall into the trap of feeling overwhelmed and rushed. And in my world, I think the root cause is that we try to do too much. With the 60-hour work schedule becoming the norm, overscheduled kids with soccer, tennis and dance, and an emphasis (especially for women) to be fit, trim, and look 10-years younger than the birth certificate actually says, it is not surprising that we are rushed, frazzled, and often disappointed — because we can’t get it all done. When we establish such unrealistic expectations of ourselves and those around us, we are simply setting ourselves up for failure which can lead to countless negatives like depression, struggling relationships, and corporate burnout.

Based on your experience or research can you explain why being rushed can harm our productivity, health, and happiness?

From a personal perspective, trying to do too much hurts my family life and negatively impacts my personal happiness. Inevitably, things go astray and go undone and the resulting in my inability to be the best version of myself. On a professional level, if I am feeling rushed to get a proposal to a client or get a new marketing campaign out, the quality of my work suffers. Being frazzled mentally doesn’t allow for me to be thoughtful and purposeful and the quality of my work product unfortunately reflects that.

On the flip side, can you give examples of how we can do more, and how our lives would improve if we could slow down?

With my work, I spend a fair amount of time in a reflective state planning strategies, approaches, and angles to promote and build our brand. When I slow down, ideas are just much more free flowing than if I am attempting to force the manifestation of something based on the time of the clock on the wall. And obviously, as a creative person, that situation is much more enjoyable if I am not rushed. I can be pensive and thoughtful, vs. grabbing the first lukewarm concept which pops from my time-challenged mind!

We all live in a world with many deadlines and incessant demands for our time and attention. That inevitably makes us feel rushed. Can you share with our readers 6 strategies that you use to “slow down to do more”? Can you please give a story or example for each?

Strategy #1

Go Away. Go Far Away.

One of my slow down strategies is to drive out to the desert (I live in Del Mar just outside of San Diego), check into a great resort, and simultaneously pop open a bottle of champagne and my laptop (and yes, in that order). I enjoy the quiet, the solitude, and the lack of commitments on my time. I find that I get my best work done when I afford myself this necessary work luxury.

Strategy #2

OTAAT. (One Task at a Time).

I find that if I need to slow down, I mentally set the expectation of focusing on just one project. So instead of attempting to multi-task and get 3 projects done simultaneously, when I should really only concentrate on just one, with all my mental energies focused on one effort, I am able to get through the singular project quicker and with improved quality outcomes.

Strategy #3

Make it a Mental Health Day.

This one is tough for me but I have been able to pull it off on several occasions. When I am really running on fumes, I realize that I need to shut it down, shut it all down. So I pick a day, pick a kid (I have three) and pick an activity which helps me refocus on the most important role in my life — that of being a great mom. So it can be as basic as grabbing lunch, hitting a movie, or jumping in the car for a little road trip, but this time helps me find my center and be ready to attack work refreshed, renewed, and far less rushed.

Strategy #4

Be Realistic.

I’m totally guilty with this one. I have a tendency to think I can cram more work into one day than humanly possible even if I wear a cape emblazoned with two Ws. My newest practice I just started last week is to create my to-do list and highlight the last two items as tasks for the following day — wish me luck.

Strategy #5

Be Calm.

I also just started to use the Calm app and starting to enjoy it. I utilize the nighttime programs to help me learn how to improve my meditation skills and I’ve got to say, I really do think I am getting better (meditation is incredibly difficult!).

Strategy #6

Let It Go (just like in Frozen)

When my kids were younger, I realized that I just could not get everything done to perfection, the way I wanted to. So I decided to give myself a break and make peace mentally by understanding that I was ok with not being perfect in all aspects of my life. With this acceptance, I was able to relax a bit which translated to me slowing down my life’s pace.

How do you define “mindfulness”? Can you give an example or story?

My definition of mindfulness is the ability to be present and to really live that particular moment. In all honesty, I’m guilty of believing that I am a master multi-tasker. For years, I actually bragged about my ability to respond to emails, listen to my kids’ argument over whose turn it is to do the dishes, and give my husband my opinion on what shirt to wear to dinner. But unfortunately, each of those efforts didn’t receive the best version of me that it deserved.

But if I were to approach that situation from a mindful place, I would prioritize the needs and attack each thing a “done. next” approach. I think I feel better with the decisions made and I know those in my world (especially my family) feel valued, as they should.

Can you give examples of how people can integrate mindfulness into their everyday lives?

I think if you develop rituals which become part of your day, when performing those rituals, you become much more mindful and much more focused on the task at hand. And a ritual doesn’t have to be anything elaborate or even meaningful. One of my morning rituals includes mentally visualizing two things I want to accomplish that day when I am making my French press coffee. And an evening ritual includes me mentally giving thanks for things that I am grateful for while walking my Siberian Husky.

Do you have any mindfulness tools that you find most helpful at work?

Honestly, I am most productive when in a completely silent environment without distractions. So, when it’s just my laptop and me — I am able to create my optimally mindful work environment.

What are your favorite books, podcasts, or resources that inspire you to use mindfulness tools or practices

Hands down, I love listening to Oprah’s Super Soul Sunday. So many of her shows focus on the importance of practicing mindfulness and how to strengthen your spiritual self. Sometimes I listen just to hear the sound of her voice, which to me, is calming and soothing and which reminds me that women can be incredibly powerful and strong yet still maintain a self of serenity.

Can you please give us your favorite “Life Lesson Quote”? Can you share how that was relevant to you in your life?

My life lesson quote is also my personal mantra — that being Carpe Diem — or Seize the Day (which also might lend itself to how and why I often feel so rushed!). But by really valuing each day as a new opportunity to further work toward your goals or to begin anew, by living my life through this lens, I’ve also felt hopeful, joyful, and optimistic. My mother died when she was relatively young and she missed what I consider, almost a lifetime of opportunities. I try to live life to the fullest and engage in all the experiences, opportunities, and simply joy-filled moments that she missed out on — for both of us.

You are a person of great influence. If you could inspire a movement that would bring the most amount of good to the most amount of people, what would that be? You never know what your idea can trigger. 🙂

The movement I am personally dedicated to is that of empowering women and elevating diversity. And that through arming oneself with knowledge and confidence, regardless of where you are from or what your background might be, you are just as worthy as the person next to you. For far too long, power and wealth has been held just by a select few. My goal is to see a more inclusive world where we all believe that we can achieve success, build wealth, and claim our true value.

Thank you for all of these great insights!

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